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When applied correctly, I prefer waterproofing from the outside. It keeps the water out of the concrete, rather than permeating up to the interior water proof layer. If it's allowed to freeze in the foundation, you could have cracking. In addition to water proofing the foundation, you also want a weeping tile or French drain around the foundation anywhere ...


17

In the end, I ended up using DRYLOK® LATEX CONCRETE FLOOR PAINT It's holding up well so far, we'll see how it does over the next few years.


12

You can do all of this using weatherproof boxes and conduit especially if you are not opposed to having conduit visible. It will only require a single 3/4" hole through the wall. Supplies: 1-gang rectangular weatherproof box. round weatherproof box. 1-gang In-use cover. 3/4" PVC conduit. 3/4" male terminal adapters 3/4" PVC conduit clamps. Procedure:...


11

You have either, too flat of a pitch in your roof or installed your roof tiles incorrectly. Just accept it and move on. It's going to have to be redone. You would be wisest to tear it all out, then get someone who knows how to do it correctly in to do it. If you half-ass it now, it will just come back later, usually after causing structural damage for years....


10

In addition to the other ideas suggested you may want to investigate installing a driveway drain that is a trough cut across the driveway and covered over with a grate. This way any water that comes to near the garage enters the trough and gets shunted to the side of the driveway. The shunted water can then pour into a large french drain or could be diverted ...


10

Disclaimer: I am not an expert. I have worked on about a half dozen seperate tile floors, though! These instructions are not meant for a shower wall or floor, just every day use floors like bathroom, kitchen, mudroom, etc. You should also have a decent bit of knowledge on how to use all the tools safely, and a lot of patience/time. This is not as simple as ...


10

You didn't indicate your location or site characteristics (slope, hillside, etc), but the location of the country, even generally could be helpful, but not required. You indicated the water bill was not high, so it could not be a water leak. That would only be if the leak was after the meter. However, the leak could be before the meter and impossible to ...


8

You definitely want your footings to extend below the frost line, otherwise as the ground freezes below your footing it will swell (as water does when it freezes) and the force of the swelling WILL push your footings out of position. Ice breaks mountains - a porch doesn't stand a chance. :) Dig DEEP. With a frost line going as low as 4', I'd dig down 5. ...


8

I would second the comments recommending a second opinion. A sump is in the basement to allow water to be drained away if it accumulates around the footings. If there's no water there it quite probably means that your water table is low enough that there's not seepage. It also would indicate that you have decent drainage around the house and rain water is ...


8

You can make watertight trays from flat sheet metal without soldering or riviting. Take a sheet of metal whose length is the length of the finished tray plus two time the height of the sides; width is the width of the finished tray plus two time the height of the sides. Fold the sheet so it ends up looking like this: You can fold up one side at a time ...


7

I am not an expert in this type of roofing, I do however have some questions and recommendations that may help you get the right answers. First the questions. Is this roof drained with an internal system or scuppers along the edges? How large (square footage) is this roof? What part of the country are you in? Have you consulted an industrial/commercial ...


7

Any Sheetrock, including green moisture resistant, is not intended for use in showers or any environment with repeated direct water contact. You can paint it , but the results will be the same, FAILURE ! Do not attempt to put tile on Drywall either. There are some new high tech backings or you can use good old fashion concrete board or hardi-backer for ...


7

Concrete itself is not waterproof, in fact, it's more like a sponge, so concrete alone is never used to create an impermeable surface. You haven't provided much info - is the roof flat, sloped? What is already up there? There are tons of different waterproofing methods available. Going under the assumption that it was properly waterproofed at some point, ...


7

I am a certified home inspector, so I am a little reluctant to answer this question. I will, however spill a few thoughts. In recent years, the tests you refer to have become fairly popular, but normally in houses that show some signs of water or mold. I personally would only recommend an infrared scan if there was suspicious water spots or paint peeling on ...


7

Mortar is not waterproof. However, there are products that can be applied to mortar (and other concrete materials), that can make the mortar waterproof.


7

This would be a situation where you'll have to use gutter straps (usually in T or K style): Image credit to acehardware.com They install on the roof decking - make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions, as you'll be penetrating the singles. Image credit to www.heritagehillweb.org


7

What is the pitch of your roof? In the USA, this type of roof (most roof types, in fact) is installed over solid decking (usually plywood or OSB) with the underlayment nailed or stapled over the decking. Any water that gets under the tiles when the wind is blowing falls onto the underlayment and is directed down towards the eaves. It seems that you have ...


7

What you want is called a bulkhead fitting. This has a gasket to make a seal against the container, and threads to connect to whatever fittings you need. Some have outside threads on only one side, or you can get them with inside and outside threads on both sides, and they cone in all sorts of different sizes and materials. You can screw in a 6mm push-...


7

Michael Karas is correct in that a half-height block foundation wall is common, but that doesn't really address your concern about water intrusion. His suggestion to seal the block does, and that wouldn't require the blocks in the first place. I would build your walls with bottom plates of treated lumber one nominal size wider than the walls themselves, ...


7

Let's start with the harder one here Smoke It looks like there's a gap in the stone to the left of the outlet. I would at least try to fill it with something (maybe caulk if you want the simplest route). Once that is done, examine the box under the cover. Make sure you don't see any other intrusion points for air. The good news is any exterior rated cover ...


6

Based on the pics and the amount of movement alone, I'm guessing that the foundation for this slab was not properly prepared. I'd wager that someone simply dug a squareish hole a few inches deep, put in boards for forms and poured the concrete. Looks great for a while, but doesn't do squat to avoid shifting in cold weather when the water freezes. A proper ...


6

Always. It's a shower. It needs to be waterproof. A product I've used and liked is RedGard: You install your backer board, then 'paint' this on. It's basically an adhesive roll-on rubber membrane. You then tile right on top of it. I like this better than the traditional plastic-behind-the-backer-board for two reasons 1) You can easily put holes in the ...


6

I would cover the openings with plastic sheet or some other water proof material. It doesn't have to be perfect, just enough to prevent the rain getting onto sensitive surfaces. The timbers should be treated and should be able to withstand some rain, but you don't want water getting into the walls etc. The main issue I see would be how to ensure it was ...


6

OSB won't be completely destroyed by water, unlike MDF or similar interior laminate materials; however, like any wood product, it will swell and shrink as it absorbs and releases water, so you should typically avoid more than casual contact with water. If you watch homebuilders putting up a typical light-frame construction home, you'll notice that the ...


6

Putting a drain sump on the inside is like catching the blood from a cut on your arm into a cup. What you really need to be doing is taking a hard look at what caused the cut and remedy that problem instead. Just pasting on bandaids will not do the trick. So getting back to the house situation. Look hard at what it takes to get water away from the outside ...


5

Any sealant you put in will just have moisture build up under it and cause it to flake away after time, rot or disintegrate. The problem is that the soil has high content of moisture.. if it was not like this 5,10 years ago it is most likely it will get worse, as somewhere nearby the ground water level is rising for some reason. For most foundations on a ...


5

There is no paint-on or other surface treatment that will solve the problem. It may mitigate slightly, but under no circumstances will a surface application dry your basement enough to allow it to be finished. Any flooring will mold up pretty quickly. There are two solutions which will solve the problem: An internal solution, which is a french drain and a ...


5

If the surface is edge grain and the previous finish was only wax, wiping down with mineral spirits and then sanding using progressively finer grits up to 220 or so should be pretty good preparation to refinish. Skip the soap and water treatment as it won't dissolve any wax and only complicates finishing. Before applying any finish the wood should be ...


5

Bread Tin Corner. How to make a water holding container without needing to solder it has been an age old necessity. You'll still see them used in cheaper bread pans, though hydroforming or stamping have taken over for the most part.


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