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7

Portland Cement has poor adhesive qualities by itself, which is why it is commonly mixed with a polymer. By definition, "thin-set" refers to an application thickness of under 3/16th of an inch. Other common additives to thin-sets are water retaining compounds that help them retain moisture to extend the curing time for more strength. By adding additional ...


5

First of all, I have to say that with the volume of work you have you can just mix the thinset by hand. I once had to install about 2.7 square meters of tiling and mixed several small batches of thinset with a spattle - no problems at all, I wasted much more time on applying the thinset and installing the tiles evenly. Totally not worth risking the drill. ...


4

1) The issue is not so much the total amount of work the drill will need to perform over the course of your project. The issue is more with the load you will be putting on the drill at any given moment. Chucking a small stirrer will (likely) let the drill operate within it's design specs. Chucking a larger stirrer will (likely) force the drill to operate ...


3

Back-Buttering shouldn't be needed. But, the best determination is to set a tile & then pry it off. You should have a nice even smush of Thin-set that covers the whole back of the tile. If you don't get full coverage, then you can try it again with a bigger notch trowel...on a fresh clean tile. If that doesn't do it, then you'll want to back-butter every ...


3

Hammer and chisel. That area should take about 10-15 minutes. If you pat the area with a hammer it will break the bond with the tile. The chisel isn't used much accept to knock off build up of thinset.


3

Your thinset should be like peanut butter. If it is too thin then you could have possible issues with mosaics and flooring. Basically you could push down to bare floor or close to it. A 4mm trowel is perfect size for most mosaics. I think that your issue is that either you aren't combing the area well enough after dropping down your thinset or possibly ...


3

Whatever he did to modify the thinset obviously does not work to the most extreme power - so it doesn't matter. Obviously he added something to the thinset or your tiles would stick much better. If it was a pure "thinset fail" then it would be pulling from concrete. There is no use arguing with the guy. It didn't work. Get your money back. Don't let ...


3

Mixing thinset by hand while remodeling a small shower with Kerdi and new tile wasn't a physically taxing process for me, but YMMV. By the way, the John Bridge forums were the most helpful resource that I found during my research and remodeling job.


3

All cement products contain silicates, from the sand use in the cement. It won't be breathable unless you create dust by cutting or breaking the panels. That being said, I don't see instructions for using Kerdi Board for flooring in the Schluter product data. It could be there and I just missed it, but I'm not seeing it. Schluter is actually pretty good ...


3

Some ideas: Use a faster mortar (or an admix designed to speed cure time). Finish the set in the evening to give it overnight to cure before foot traffic. Lay down blankets and then plywood/OSB after the mortar has sufficiently set. It'll dramatically reduce the force on any particular tile and give you a good safety buffer. Set one side of the area one day,...


2

Schluter may not warranty Ditra if your slab does not permit moisture and you use a modified thinset. Laticrete Stratamat has a "mortar hydration vent" that is claimed to allow either modified or unmodified thinset. I have found significant price breaks for Stratamat if ordered online. Local suppliers are a bit higher, but sometimes worth spending extra ...


2

I use my cordless Makita to mix thinset with a small paddle. I get through one mixing per battery - batteries are 3 years old. The method I use if I am doing a full bag is about 6 inches of water and slowly pour the powder in. When it gets anywhere near oatmeal consistency, more water. Then I pour more powder. Repeat 1-2 more times. Once all powder ...


2

You will only need the backer board for your entry way. No other waterproofing needed. If it was your bathroom at the shower entrance, it would be a good idea, but since it will only be an occasional wetting from tracking in water or snow, and porcelain tile is impervious, it will handle it very well. You should seal your grout joints too, so the color ...


2

If you have a grout float a nice flat one that will work for pushing down Mosaic tiles into the thinset it because it's nice and flat and it'll leave your mosaics flat after you push down plus you can control much easier the amount of force you use to push down on them


2

Finding and then using those screw heads is going to be a nightmare, so I would abandon the idea of removing the wall board semi-intact. Find the studs (with one of those cryptically-named stud finders), cut the boards between the studs, and then pry it all off. Or, use an abrasive disk to cut right down the line of screws.


2

I have had (some) success using the following technique: using a utility knife or grout saw, remove as much grout as you can using a narrow margin trowel (see pic) with a hammer, carefully tap the trowel under the tile in as many places as you can. This breaks up the mortar somewhat. Do not use any leveraging type action until you have tapped the trowel ...


1

I would take a more selective approach here. I really only see a few tiles that would be problematic. If there are more than that then take DMoore's advice. I'd take out the tile in small areas (6 to 12 inches in diameter), then assess the situation. Chances are you can grind the substrate to level and reinstall tile (using a straightedge or flat panel as ...


1

You have to take it out or live with it. You don't thinset between the cement board until you are tiling. This ensures that you will have a chance to flatten things out. So knock out tile and all thinset, including the stuff between the cement board. You should be able to get this with a hammer and chisel pretty easy. The retile, filing in the gaps during ...


1

It is obvious that there is a large concern about getting air to your thinset. The problem that you have is that there is too much variance in the equation to properly answer this. Porcelain plus Ditra will cause quite a barrier but there is also airflow of the room and temperature. The problem isn't the use of the accelerator, it is the effectiveness ...


1

Don't sweat grinding it off. Get a rare earth magnet tied to a short piece of string and when it finds a screw, it goes in its own since it is hanging off the string A 4" lead should do it. I used the to find screws in flooring underlayment that had vinyl sheet flooring over it. The one I use is about 3/8" in diameter, with a hole in the middle for a screw. ...


1

Ed is right that any grinder for concrete will handle thinset. However I doubt that the thinset is grindable. When thinset goes onto concrete there is no molecular bond that causes the thinset to stick permanently to the concrete. In fact it expands and contracts at different rate as concrete so it is actually "moving" all the time. Thinset works ...


1

I was thinking of a grinder like this disc for concrete I have one I bought years ago for my 9" grinder the disc is 12" it will take a entire single bay garage floor surface in about 2 hours. Cheaper than shot blasting and my disc has done 5 or 6 garages and still has a couple left. The trick is to keep the grinder moving in overlapping orbits. the link ...


1

I'm hoping you haven't paid yet. I don't think any manufacturer would consider this acceptable. (You could call their tech support just for laughs and see what they say.) At the end of the day, manufacturer's specifications are what matter. So let's assume you have a sub-standard job. Off the top of my head, here's a few options: 1- tear it out and do ...


1

if you are making up 2" of space, standard premix concrete is fine. you dont need anything else. its mass and mechanical locking expansion will hold everything together just fine. if its 1", you can still do it with premix, bud you need to add polymer modifier and i would put in a sheet of steel rebar mesh (3 x 3)


1

Either your way or Ed Beal's are fine & do work. You just don't want any voids or unsupported portions of tile to avoid impact cracking or breaking. Back-buttering & going to a wider trowel notch should do it. But otherwise, mark your layout if you fill-in, to make sure you're actually filling to the row's edge.


1

Are you sure you don't want to be looking at a hydraulic cement or mortar rather than just Portland cement? http://www.lowes.com/pd_41334-96-00924_0__?productId=3033247 Or something like this? http://www.superior-industries.com/pro_patch_600_product_271.html I'm not trying to advocate specific products or brands, but illustrating examples of products ...


1

I was mixing thinset on my porch last year and some dropped on the cement. My son started wiping it up and I said "don't bother" and he was a bit surprised. Went to the porch a week later with a putty knife and popped the thinset off with a few taps of a hammer on the putty knife. Moral of the story being thinset kind of binds to concrete but not really. ...


1

in my experience, let it dry first - just as you would let joint comound dry...dry to the touch and firm. I've pushed the envelope on a couple of occassions and what enbds up happening is the thinset shrinks as it dries, sucking the tile in, and causing a hairline crack.


1

Once the initial set/superficial hardening has taken place, water should not be a problem. Excess water is a big problem when it can still alter the mix of the cement or wash it away - after that, it won't have much effect. On the other hand, it will be difficult to "dry the steps well" with water trapped under the tiles, so covering would probably make ...


1

I've always used a floor scraper for jobs like this. The longer handle gives much better leverage, and some of the better ones have a kick plate or other attachment that lets you put some leg power into them too.


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