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Yes: I have, it works. But is there a reason you are asking? I have done many different tile jobs in the past 4 decades. I have favorite methods some are just old school, because I have had success on my home and commercial jobs that I like. Many of the newer materials may be better, however I use them if the owner requires it, I have only had major ...


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An untaped (unsupported) joint is an opportunity for more flex than you want in a tiled wall. I'd definitely try to bond the new and old drywall as well as possible. Unfortunately the best time to replace the drywall was while the cabinets were out, when you could have cut the drywall up above the lower cabinet line and buried it. Now, I'd probably either ...


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Ask the company that did the work if your plans would void the warranty. Regardless of anything any of us could say on here, it comes down to the company honoring the warranty.


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Yes it is. If it's the same size as the rest of the tiles he'll just knock out some and put in your decorative piece. If it's a irregular tile, he'll trace it where it should go and just cut out the shape with a hand held tile saw.


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You're between a sheetrock and a hard place (sorry). I can't count how many times I've seen this done and done it myself. The weight won't be a problem assuming the sheetrock was fastened properly to the joists. I really don't know another way to do it unless you have a six year old that can fit in there. What are your plans for venting this to the outside? ...


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At one time or another I've seen every type of drywall fail when it's used in a shower. Either because the grout cracked and went undetected, the soap dish leaked or water got behind the faucets. I'm a big fan of the concrete backer board. It's available in different thicknesses and many brands can be cut with a regular utility knife. Good luck


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I did something similar on a smaller area. I used some plastic tools - scrapers etc and some cement remover product. The cement remover product has an acid base (stings like xxxx if you have an open cut...), but I only applied it to small areas (used a cotton bud) and never to the joints between the tiles you want to keep. If you don’t have patience at ...


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that dark stuff is concrete or mortar screed under the tiles. the light stuff is tile adhesive and grout You can grout over those triangular bits without causing any problems.


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No, you don't. Doing so could be a way to stiffen and reinforce the framing, but it's not required. I'd be sure your corner laps are all secure and well supported. The left end in particular concerns me a little--that's a fairly long span for flat lumber. If there's any chance of movement, add framing underneath and screw things together well. Construction ...


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Assuming the following scenario, I don't think taping offers much. If there's movement in the framing at the corner, tape isn't going to help. Your plan to caulk is probably fine. I'm not sure I'd use silicone, though. It's not paintable. An acrylic-silicone blend or flexible grout would be better. ____________________________________ | | ...


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I usually do tape with fiber tape and thinset , this helps to lock everything together and the corner grout between the tiles won’t crack as easily or often.


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I agree that these leveling systems are both more effective for larger format tiles. However, I think the question is good and one I had trouble finding an answer to when I was tiling my kitchen. Re-use Wedge: The wedge is re-usable, the plastic tab is broken off. Screw/Spin: The spin top is re-usable, the plastic tab is broken off. Tools Wedge: To get ...


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Some of the wedge clips that I have seen require (or strongly recommend) a special tool for tightening the wedge because hand force is unlikely to get it properly tight. On one hand, the screw type doesn't need a tool and on the other hand, the screw type doesn't have a tool so it could be tiring for your hands. Another issue is re-use. For the wedge ...


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