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1

In some cases I have wanted the tile base lower than the sheetrock. This way there is not a large ledge for water to collect on. You can float some thin set to the surface but make sure it is completely dry prior to tiling and make a large taper or it will be noticeable.


0

Yes you can float on top of red guard before tiling. If you want a perfectly flat wall and assuming you are tiling then the proper way to do this is to put some 1/2" thick strips vertically make sure the strips are plumb and put a level across the two strips and make sure they are level with each other. Then you can put a fair amount of thinset and screed ...


3

Yes you can glue the backer to the wall. No matter what you do if the wall shifts there will be issues. Most the time if there is concrete I do not use backer unless there will be a large difference in surface height.


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I have tiled many areas around wood stoves. It’s not only the adhesive but the tile , backer board and air gap that all come together. I normally use thin set with an add mix. It is tougher to keep in place until set but I have had mastic melt several years later and the tiles start slipping down. The gap I mention helps the backer board radiate heat so the ...


1

What about adding 1/4" backer to 1/2" for firmness - Looks like a solution? The tub has been installed so another stud can't be added.


1

Use a commercial grout cleaning product or a 50/50 mixture of white vinegar and water. Spray the solution and let it sit for a few minutes then scrub with a sponge or brush. Repeat until the stains are removed. It may take multiple tries.


2

Linoleum can be a total bear to remove in and of itself. If the substrate is screwed or nailed down then it shouldn't be too bad but if it's glued to the sub-floor then you're gonna have a bad time. If I had to guess then there might very well be hardwood flooring beneath the linoleum which may have been sanded down to accommodate the linoleum's thickness. ...


0

The tub gets installed first. A Fiberglass tub/shower is your water barrier. Putting anything else down does not help. The water would just be trapped between the tub and the other "water barrier" creating an environment for mold and other issues. The fact is if a tub/shower pan is installed correctly there is almost a zero chance it leaks unless ...


1

Shower pan on top of the sub floor works fine. I did this recently and plumbed/installed the pan prior to installing backerboard. I recommend using Georgia pacific denshield board as backer rather than cement backer board. Its reasonably priced and doesn't required a water proofing step. Silicone all edges and bring it down to the shower pan nailing fin lip, ...


0

Most of the time, installers will just wait until the tub is installed before they lay down the tile backer, and then just cut around the tub for the backer board and tile. In most cases, this is fine, but not ideal. The wood subfloor is a permeable surface, and water can easily seep between the gaps of the tub, and the edge of the backer board. The only ...


1

The discoloration will never go away on its own. You will need to remove the silicone (difficult, yes...) and use the color matching caulk from the grout manufacturer. In the future - the color matching caulk should always be used in the corners in place of grout so the two walls are able to move slightly (which they will) without cracking the grout in the ...


2

Generally speaking, any time you apply a glossy material over a matte material you get darkening. It's unfortunate that this was discovered now, but you do have options. If you haven't yet sealed the grout, and plan to, see what that does for the situation. Some sealers won't change the color, but some will. Maybe it'll bring things closer to a match. ...


0

Option 1. If you want to go crazy on water proofing then you'd install a liner on your subfloor maybe keri, use keri band to go up the walls and treat it like a shower stall, ardex 8/9 the joins then install the shower and then the tile. Unless the tile guy is saying he needs a layer of concrete board in which case you would want to install that under ...


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Plan 2, gives your the extra strength under a fiberglass pan. tile to the pan, and caulk where it meets the floor, just like a tub Plan 3, It is just wasted money and if you have to ever pull the shower pan out to address problems with plumbing it will be much more work to pull up the tile. Tell your tile guy you can find someone who is happy to ...


0

The shower pan is what contains the water. Tile, grout, cement backer board, plywood, etc. will not stop water from getting out. A properly installed and drained pan will prevent any water from escaping and causing damage to the subfloor, joists, or downstairs ceiling. So the important thing is to get the shower water-tight to begin with using the ...


0

Not sure if it's the "right" way, but I would go with 2). It'll be a litte more work putting the cement backer board in around the shower drain. Have to make sure you seal all the seams in the backer board with the right material, thinset+tape? I assume you're putting in a fiberglass shower base?


1

Your first mistake was using the diamond pads. Part of the discoloration is stone dust being embedded in the concrete filler. You had a mold problem or staining from food/drinks being spilled. You should have started out with a non abrasive concrete / grout cleaner. You could have even used a mixture of beach and water. Try doing this and just work on the ...


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