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2

Good to be proactive and catch this before the tile goes up. Obvious problems I see are that the drywall is poorly cut (can take it out and trace it to re-cut a matching piece without gaps or overcut at almost no cost so easily fixed). Any of a drywall cutout tool, a Dremel, a keyhole saw, a hacksaw blade or a drill with a side cut bit can cut the piece ...


1

You should resign yourself to the idea of not finding an exact match. All such products (whether natural or man-made, i.e. "cultured") have a large variation of color and pattern, even amongst tiles that come out of the same box. Manufacturers, distributors, and installers typically warn end-users of this. The best you can likely hope for is ...


0

Looks like what I have. Made in Spain and purchased in US in 2015, quite likely available in UK as well. Mine seems a bit lighter but it does come in darker shades (I received a box of darker tiles by mistake). The edge has a slight radius. If your edge is a sharp 90 then you probably have a natural stone tile.


0

You should aim for two layers of continuous below the ditra, 3/4+1/2" for the best chance at controlling movement, the top 1/2" should only be screwed into the layer below without penetrating the joist. If you need to add some additional height you can use Ditra XL as well.


1

Given the amount you want to raise the floor I'd suggest 2x1" planks screwed to each joist (+0.75") with the 3/4" on top of that (+0.75"). You should then put a sheet of 1/4" ply on top. This way if you ever need to remove the tiles / ditra you only need to tear up the 1/4" ply and can leave the 3/4" floor intact. Also, ...


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The weight of the doors is on the tub, and it's hard to find studs behind tile. That's why studs are not normally used for shower doors. However, since you know where the studs are, the benefit of using longer screws is that you can get away with drilling much smaller holes. Go for it. Drill just barely large enough for your screw through the tile and ...


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What you were provided with is the standard install hardware for shower doors. Most people don't know exactly where the studs are. You can definitely install the doors as recommended using the provided screws and anchors. Since you know where the studs are, you can use the longer screws but do not drill 3/8" holes, way too big. stick with the diameter ...


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You will be fine with the 1 1/2" screws. If you think about your install it's exactly what the manufacturer expects (99% of shower doors are tile over hardiebacker). That said if you are bothered there will be no harm in using longer screws with the same diameter.


1

No, there isn't. You'll want to follow a common strategy of either running a full tile or a joint down the center of the room so that the rows at the edges look appropriate. Snap one or two chalk lines on the floor as references, then snap one or two at 90 degrees to get your joint lines straight. With a wet saw these types of cuts are not difficult nor time ...


0

It will quite possibly ruin the waterproofing layer under the tile. It is best to let it set up, roughen the glossy surface of the tile and set new tile directly over the first. There will most likely need to be an extension ring added to the drain to get it to the new level.


5

This appears to be very shoddy workmanship. I can't tell a lot about how plumb the walls may or may not be but the wallboard has to be done properly in order to get good results once the tile is applied. However, it doesn't appear the tiler is very knowledgeable or skilled with properly installing tile. He/she should be using spacers between all of those ...


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