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Asbestos ceiling tiles were quite common for many years because of their ability to handle high temperatures. That looks like standard cellulose type of tile to me but the only way to know for sure is to test it. If the building was built after the 70’s you can be fairly sure that it is plain cellulose. If it is not disturbed their is no risk, my suggestion ...


0

Do you know anything about the building you have them in? Age of the building, dates of renovations? If you can pinpoint that it might rule out the asbestos for you. Asbestos building materials were made illegal in North America and if you can find someone (an older person with some years in) at that place they might be able to help give you some ...


10

Call a plumber immediately! This is uncomfortably close to my recent experiences.. My kitchen floor had a damaged tile (similar story, something got dropped on it) and water was welling up from under it when it was stepped on. We thought it might have been absorbed by water seeping into the damaged area, so it wasn't a huge issue, it would dry out, then it ...


1

I just did this and tried some of the solutions above. The only thing that ended up working was rubbing alcohol. Soak the plastic as much as you can with a soaked rag. Then pull slowly. Some areas go faster than others - usually the dryer areas (hence the alcohol). It goes faster if you 1) go slow enough to keep the plastic from tearing, and 2) keep ...


2

Caulk is the way to go when there is a change of plane as there are shifts in the structure that will crack regular grout. You should clean all that mess out of there with a utility knife, single edge razor blades, a #10 scalpel, whatever. Clean out with some vinegar to kill any mold residue, let dry and re caulk with quality silicone caulk. The only time ...


8

Get a dehumidifier running in there and see if you can dry it out, you’ll have to stop using the bathroom (if you can) and it might take a while (possibly days) Once it’s completely dry try using one fixture at a time and see if you can isolate the cause. The other posts have given you some good advice and you might end up paying someone to rip up that ...


10

It’s highly unlikely that “failed” grout would create the refill rate of wet flooring you describe. Most shower failures are generated by leaky or failing plumbing in the wall, behind the tile. I have often seen the water damage extend to the framing, which necessitates cutting out and replacing that portion of framing. Your wet floor problem needs to be ...


43

I think your cracking the floor is a blessing in disguise. Clearly there is water under the tile that needs to be dealt with. I'd start by checking the obvious things like the toilet seal and the bathtub and/or shower drains. But ultimately you're going to want to pull that tile up, dry it out thoroughly, replace any water-damaged materials, and replace ...


3

Many shower doors have adjustment built into the frame or stiles at the wall. Usually the door fastens to a box section with sits tightly into a 'C' section. Once the door is fitted and adjusted the box section is 'locked' into place by drilling holes into the box section through pre-drilled holes in the 'C' section. Small self tapping screws and plastic ...


3

Almost any such door has a range of adjustment or applicability, often in the form of panel lap. Tiled openings just aren't that precise. Look at the installation manuals for any models you like. They'll tell you what the range is. For example, this one specifically lists 56-60". Up to 4 in. of adjustment for width, if needed


1

If I need to make a proper shower bed with a slope I only would use thinset, self leveling compound will try to eliminate the needed grade or slope by leveling (I.e. no slope). So use thinset.


1

Using some wet room type silicone should work just fine for that joint under the conditions you mention. You can usually find transparent variants of it as well, leaving the design intact. And it takes no real time to apply.


1

You want to fill in all the grout lines under the cover plate. Don't worry about that last tile edge next to the outlet box and don't fill in all the space around the box. If the distance between the face of the box and the finished wall is greater than 1/4" then box extenders are needed. Enjoy your new kitchen.


1

I have the same problem and need to remove the tile, durock / cement board as well as the subfloor due to water leaks and mold. Nothing is easy about this job, but scoring the floor with a skill saw cement blade has certainly helped by making the job a little more manageable. Open windows, block all vents and mask required! Back to work. . .


0

I would fill the gap with grout or thinset like Ed mentioned but then I'd install some PVC baseboard and 3/4" quarter round to cover it up. Enjoy the new vanity.


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I would just mix some thinset or grout and fill the gap. This would keep moisture from getting into the wood below when moping or a splash or leak.


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not entirely sure what your concern is, but one tip I would suggest is you can carefully mask areas with painters tape where you don't want caulk so that you can spread caulk more effectively (thouroughly) in the uneven joints.


1

The order of installing something like a kitchen backsplash and the kitchen sink faucet would really depend upon a number of factors and preferences. Working clearance. If the faucet location is very near to the backsplash it could be difficult to install the tiles with the faucet in place. Installing tiles has use of mortar, grout and possibly tile ...


0

I was always taught that you should use a flexible sealant at every change of direction or material. So all intersections, angles etc. plus where tile meets another material such as the tub or a non tiled part of the wall etc. Obviously sometimes this means you'll need a paintable sealant (tile to wood or plastered wall/ceiling for example). I always ...


4

You might push soap or grime into the gap at the bottom of the cabinets when cleaning the tiles, so it's probably a good idea to seal the gap. I didn't do this in my kitchen and I think intelligent life is evolving in there. I'd use silicone caulking instead of grout at the these locations, because it's more flexible, and I'm convinced that there is always ...


2

Matching sanded or unsanded caulking is a must. 9/10 times you can purchase a caulk that matches the grout. By using the matching caulk, it creates a natural looking flow for all the tile and grout you just installed. I recommend what one of the other members suggested and fill the tub half way with water, then use matching caulk around tub, then drain. You’...


1

I always use a color match caulk on any right angle or edge of tile,silicone is not a good idea for too many reasons.


0

Inside corners should always be caulked, not grouted. Walls move, and when grout moves it cracks. If you're using epoxy grout on the walls you can actually use it in the corners too but keep in mind it's more difficult to work with especially in corners. If you're using epoxy grout on the walls and going to caulk the corners, epoxy grout the horizontal lines ...


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I've started using DAP 3.0 caulk. Alcohol clean up and it REALY sticks well to all surfaces. Only in clear and white though.


1

Most bathrooms I've been in seem to have silicone sealant in this area. I think this may be an evolution of tile grout (and other sealant types) which (used to?) be somewhat prone to developing black mould (or cracking, leaking etc), especially where there's a shower over the bath. Some silicone specifically claims to have anti-mould features, although water-...


11

Caulking always! Fill the tub 50% with water and caulk it. Allow the caulking to dry then drain the tub. If you caulk with no water in the tub poly, fiberglass and composite tubs stretch and tear the caulk when filled. Cast tubs are usually solid enough to not make a difference.


2

You can see the angled mounting bracket hanging down under the sink. The bracket is what holds the sink firmly on the wall, the lower holes in the sink are for keeping the bottom of the sink from being pulled away and up from the wall once it is lowered down onto the bracket. The top holes have nothing to do with the mounting of the sink. The bracket ...


1

I only see one screwhole in the wall, which has rust colored stains around it and there's clearly mildew on the back of the sink. Looks like they may have also used construction adhesive on the back (or is that just silicone?) which is fine but not an acceptable alternative to mechanical anchors at multiple points. Seems like it was poorly mounted to begin ...


1

You've got four holes through the sink for mounting: two large ones in the top corners and two smaller ones at the bottom. The wall where the sink was looks like it's got water damage so I'm guessing it was mounted to the wall with smaller bolts and washers than it should have been and with the water damage and your massive 130 pounds, it just succumbed to ...


0

It sounds like backing rod interfered with the proper function of the caulk. I realize that it's common to use that to save caulk in wide or deep gaps, but sanded caulk is already intended for use in wider gaps than unsanded caulks. As long as your sanded caulk states that it is mold and mildew resistant and suitable for use in showers, I don't see a ...


2

There is no problem with thinset adhering to Redgard painted backer. Just make sure there isn't a vapor barrier installed behind the backer board or you'll trap in the moisture. Hopefully, you taped all the seams on the backer board. Use a fortified thinset. Let it set 5 to 10 minutes before applying. Set the tile and wait 24 hours before grouting. Good luck....


1

Get some of the Loctite Power Grab construction adhesive. This stuff grabs pretty good but you'll need to clamp it, prop it up, or duct tape it in place until the adhesive hardens, Good luck


0

For long lasting results you want to use thinset mortar on backer board. Or you need to find a solvent based tile adhesive. The newer low VOC water based ones don't stand up in wet environments. The older solvent based ones can hold up for at lest 13 years in a 2 shower a day environment on a drywall backing. (I did it. Installed 1" tiles, grouted ...


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