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41

It's a bit difficult to figure out from the photo but it appears that they stuck scraps of tile to the wall with compound and then simply stuck the finish tiles to that with more compound. NOT A GOOD PLAN! The finish tiles are poorly supported and also the smooth surface of the scraps doesn't provide good adhesion for the compound. This is a total tear-out ...


30

You don't "pad out" a wall and then tile it. They had a couple of inches to work with. So stud the wall with 2x2 or 2x4's flat and cover with cement board, waterproof, then tile. It probably would have been faster than what they did. You're going to have to remove all of that wall and redo it.


20

Regarding the gap, baths almost never fit the space exactly. Apart from the obvious problem of building and preparing walls millimetre-accurately, if the bath fits the space too closely then you're going to have extreme difficulty actually getting it in there. Pythagoras says that dropping the bath in anything less than perfectly parallel will make the ...


19

Let's look at the three pictures above. #1 - This is probably the most common install. You cement board is on the same plane as the flange. It is thicker so it ends up hanging over. Tip - If you are using cement board by itself I would strongly suggest using 1/2 inch. Also I am a strong supporter of hardibacker since it doesn't allow water through or ...


14

It certainly is acceptable to do a tile job in phases. There's no structural reason that tiles need to have their supporting mortar connected mechanically. The critical bond is to the substrate, not adjacent tiles or mortar. Large residential and commercial tile jobs are done in stages every day, and with no special procedures or materials. One caveat ...


11

You have either, too flat of a pitch in your roof or installed your roof tiles incorrectly. Just accept it and move on. It's going to have to be redone. You would be wisest to tear it all out, then get someone who knows how to do it correctly in to do it. If you half-ass it now, it will just come back later, usually after causing structural damage for years....


7

The backer should go OVER the flange, for better water drainage. Because the backer board tends to bow out when 'lipped' over the tub flange, you should: Install the tub Install shims on the studs to 'pad out' the backer so that it just clears the tub flange and overhangs it a bit (but doesn't 'land' on the rim of the tub) but leaves a 1/4 to 3/8 inch ...


7

you can certainly stop for the day. the things you have to watch are: a) finish your tiles all in one line or row, not on the diagonal. that way you can check it with a laser or string to make sure everything is straight. once it sets, you can't nudge tiles to get a good line. b) depending on your pattern, you may have adjacent joints lap one, two, ...


7

What is the pitch of your roof? In the USA, this type of roof (most roof types, in fact) is installed over solid decking (usually plywood or OSB) with the underlayment nailed or stapled over the decking. Any water that gets under the tiles when the wind is blowing falls onto the underlayment and is directed down towards the eaves. It seems that you have ...


7

I disagree with some of the reasoning of the other answers. They should have furred out the wall. Everyone here agrees on this. They could have framed out more or just added shims/drywall layer... lots of methods here depending on how far you go out. Point that no one has brought up. Most bathrooms - normal ones - not the fit-for-a-king master... they ...


7

TL;DR Five-spotting is a really bad practice. Per https://www.daltile.com/how-to/how-to-install-tile/how-to-install-large-format-tile: When installing large format tile, there must be at least 90% mortar contact It is hard to say whether the compound they used was mortar so I am not going to gripe about that. The fact that they should have furred out the ...


5

If you're seeing that water on the drywall on the other side of the wall opposite where the tile is then your shower was not installed with a proper membrane. You need a waterproof memberane and a suitable substrate for the shower. This would be something like kerdi and/or a tile backerboard painted with redgard. You cannot use drywall to back it, nor can ...


5

If all interior walls or, if insulated exterior walls,no need to fill gap with anything. Just get your baseboard moldings up to finish the job


5

This greatly depends on the type tile you have. If it is a manmade tile such as porcelain, or ceramic, then you don't have to worry about sealing it. Most natural stone tiles, especially softer or water permeable stone such as marble, limestone/travertine, and slate should be sealed as well. This would ideally be done prior to grouting to prevent the stone ...


5

Sorry to say this, but number 3 really is your only option. First the reasons why: I can tell just by looking and from your description, your subfloor is rotten and now unstable. More tiles and grout are going to crack, come up. The mould is almost certainly inside the sub-floor and maybe even the jousts. Cleaning the surface will very likely not do much of ...


5

Most electric receptacles are installed into the box with long screws that have a special backing washer. The washer is there to hold out the receptacle, so you can loosen the screws until your receptacle is flush with the outer surface of the wall. The face plate is then fastened to the receptacle. In the US, the screws from the receptacle to box are at the ...


5

That big of a gap is a problem, especially the gap in the 2nd picture. It is standard practice to ensure that the waterproof membrane overlaps the vertical lip of the tub at the wall, so that any moisture that penetrates through the grout (yes, grout is porous whether or not you use grout sealer) will make its way down into the tub well rather than into the ...


5

This appears to be very shoddy workmanship. I can't tell a lot about how plumb the walls may or may not be but the wallboard has to be done properly in order to get good results once the tile is applied. However, it doesn't appear the tiler is very knowledgeable or skilled with properly installing tile. He/she should be using spacers between all of those ...


4

In almost all cases this is a no. There are waterproofing systems you can use but not flooring pad. When you lay your tile the pad will move a little and cause issues. In essence with a pad you are creating a giant floating tile floor. Note: To reduce sound from the floor you want to do two things. Build up the subfloor. Adding an inch of plywood ...


4

I'm very sorry to say this but you're going to have to remove all the tiles and start over. You will never been able to prevent this from leaking fully. It may also mean removing and replacing the backing as well. The critical step you missed was the waterproofing membrane that goes under the tiles and in and over the drain pipe. The tiles don't stop the ...


4

So you have a couple of options that will minimize the mold right away: Wall boards. Large stone sheets - I have put up a few granite systems and they are not getting any mold. Larger tile. If you choose wall boards or large stone sheets then you still need to caulk. There are caulks - not usually sold at the big box - that are virtually mold proof. If ...


4

Since the plaster wall (hopefully drywall) has gone soft, I'd open it up. Cut out a section from the floor 2' up (I pick 2' since you can see a lot but still use a half sheet of drywall to repair it, leaving the other half to repair your repair). You don't want to leave drywall that's gotten that wet installed anyway. For it to get this wet this fast, I can ...


4

Instead of tile, consider 9/16"-ish thin brick veneer, which looks good in combination with concrete block. Something like this: You could put a wire lath over the blocks, and then just use mortar to adhere the brick to the lath/blocks. Another option would to be run a 1x8 cedar "trim" board to cover the horizontal concrete blocks. This would look really ...


4

For the tile spacing issue, I don't think there is much you can do at this point short of ripping it all out and starting over. For the tiles not set in plane correctly, I think you could carefully remove those tiles (just the individual tile), scrape out the hardened thinset behind them, and then re-apply with new thinset. For the thinset squeezing out, ...


4

I do not think I would do another tiling project in the near future. It may be best to rent or borrow a wet saw; Buy one on eBay; or sell your new one on eBay afterwards as a used item. (community wiki because an unanswered question with answers in the comments is like a faraway tap dripping in the night.)


4

That makes sense the installation video from Oatey says "wateproof drywall or cement board" but your kerdi board is waterproof too, so it's equivalent. Be sure not to screw through the shower liner--if you need to screw low on the Kerdi board put a dwang (cross-block) in above the liner and screw to that.


3

I honestly don't even see how a poorly done tile job can leak this quickly. I can tile and grout a wall pretty sloppy and it will be good for at least 4-6 month and possibly a lot lot longer. The short-term fixes you can do now are exactly that at best - short-term. It is possible that you will spend money trying to waterproof after - which in no way is ...


3

Hold your hawk under the area you are applying the grout. It is normal to drop quite a bit, especially if it is something you don't do everyday, so let the hawk catch it before it hits the floor.


3

Some generic pieces of advice here: Buy cabinets with a bigger footprint. If a smaller footprint it can work out if there is an equal distance around the bottom. You can lay down mosaics to make a border. It really depends and we would need to see a picture for more help. Anytime you tile a bathroom, tile the whole thing. Cabinets should sit on the tile.


3

Yes, in all likelihood this can be repaired fairly easily. It is a good possibility that these holes are due to poor quality work where the original grout was not fully squeezed down into the joints. You may find other areas that are not yet broken open but also just a partial penetration into the joint. You will have to work carefully to replace with like ...


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