9

When I am redoing a bathroom and adding the needed backer board to a subfloor assembly, I would remove all existing finish floors no matter how many to get back down to the original subfloor. Then evaluate that, repair it if needed, add to it if needed to make it stiff enough for tile, then add the one layer of 1/4" backer board, then the heating wires, ...


5

Your current plywood is suitable for hardwood installation. I do not ever like to use 1/4 subfloor as it is brittle and when screwed sometimes doesn't lay flat. If I added to your subfloor I would at least put in 1/2 inch but like I said you don't need it with 16" OC. Note that a thicker sub might have benefits but at the same time you are adding weight ...


4

We installed an 18' diameter pool on top of a concrete pad using the 2' x 2' interlocking square foam pieces between the pool and the concrete. It feels great underfoot and the pool has been going strong for 4 years now.


4

The first issue you need to address is why is the base eroding in the same place time after time? The large majority of above ground pools survive many years with a leveled sand base. The probable reasons for your erosion problem is an unstable base, misguided water runoff or the base is a bit too high in relationship to the surrounding area allowing runoff ...


4

There is no reason to glue down engineered hardwood floor to an underlayment. This is just for initial aesthetics. The glue will NEVER last (in a residential setting). The only thing the glue will do is give you fits and make your install seem tighter. Within weeks or months the glue will come loose and you will have a floating floor. Nothing wrong with ...


4

Staples are far more prone to cause leaks than roofing nails. For a pro roofer with a coil nail gun, they save no time at all .vs. using nails. For a non-pro who can actually use a hammer, they save very little time .vs. nails. Likewise, in the normal process of construction, it's quite common to have some period of time where the underlayment is the only ...


3

In agreement with the above and further suggest: 1) Walk the existing floor in silence, use 1-1/4" screws to eliminate real or perceived squeaks. 2) Pay attention to the butt joints, if they are swelled knock them down with a belt sander. 3) At the top of the stairs be sure the entire area is screwed down well, it takes brutal traffic. 4) Go opposite the ...


3

I would not bother with used pad . You can get new inexpensive rubber pad of the appropriate thickness when you need it. I have reused older type pads , you can never get them clean; dirt goes through the carpet into the pad. And , I have used new pad trimmings for attic supplemental insulation , again ,the used pads are dirty.


3

Unless installing a rigid material such as new plywood, luan, cement board, etc - you generally do not nail it down. When you do, ring shank is the right type of nail. But it has to be a decent quality nail vs. the cheapest bidder, also, the condition of the flooring it is being nailed into is quite important. Just nailing into plywood isn't going to cut it ...


3

I've never had to do this (install tile over cork), but I think you need to remove the cork. Backer/cement boards needs to be firmly fastened to the sub-floor. Any kind of softness, give, or "springiness" will be transferred up the tiles and will cause the tiles or the tile joints to crack.


3

The problem is that if there is an issue with the product at some point in the future, the manufacturer will deny any warranty claim because the installation instructions were not followed. If this were mine, I'd insist that the installer follow the instructions for the products regardless of what everyone else does.


3

Red Rosin Paper (which is a bit old-school, but can still be found) would fill the bill, I believe. It's plant based. Seems to be getting sold for floors now, but was the thing people used before housewrap on exterior walls under siding. However, depending on type and installation of insulation, all you really need is an airspace between the insulation and ...


2

If the subfloor is plywood no other ply is necessary; but you do need a flat surface for the Ditra. If the subfloor cannot either be scraped, chiseled, or sanded flat then self leveling compound may be required. If you use self leveling compound remember that the surface should be primed first - follow the product's prep recommendations. 1/8" plywood, in ...


2

You don't have to glue it but it needs to be secured somehow - duct tape. Don't want the pieces rolling up on each other over time. You would just be duct taping the underlayment to the outside flooring or in the inside seams. And duct tape isn't hillbillying your floor. It is used because how well it handles moisture. Maybe someone has a specific ...


2

DO not overlap as it will cause a noticeable uneven floor when walking over the areas. We cut to size and tape where the underlayment meets. Overlap the wall areas and once flooring is complete prior to baseboard installation, simply cut along the edge (leaving a 1/4"-1/2" overcut) and tuck the underlayment under the sheetrock. This allows an overlap of ...


2

You need to tile over a solid surface. Needless to say, this stuff doesn't count, so you'll need to remove it. With a wooden subfloor, the preferred tile base is cementboard. Screw it down, mortar the seams, and go to town with your tiles.


2

This is a subjective question that depends on individual risk tolerance. I wouldn't bother. My previous home was a similar situation, with several cracks and no expansion joints. It was obvious that the basement was perpetually dry and the cracks stable. (They probably occurred as a result of initial settling 50 years ago.) I applied fiberglass mesh to the ...


2

First, I'd counter your plans to orient the second layer perpendicular to the subfloor. Plywood and OSB have a strength axis that should run across the joists. Instead of turning the top layer, simply stagger its joints with respect to those of the subfloor. Start with a ripped half sheet and stagger the butt joint by two joists. I've never heard the ...


2

Plywood would be a very good choice. You should consult the ditra literature for your particular joist spacing, however, generally the bare minimum thickness for plywood/T&G subfloor under ditra is 5/8". Plywood in general adds more strength to a subfloor than cement board, and given that you are going over it with ditra, it makes more sense to add ...


2

The question is quite broad, but there are two primary differences (aside from cost): sound management and the ability to level imperfect subfloors. Sound management (deadening, which can reduce tapping noise) depends on the thickness and composition of the underlayment. Leveling ability is primarily a matter of underlayment thickness. You'll need to ...


2

I would use 1/4inch Luan panels and install without adhesive. Just install to manufacturers specs. This is typically to lay it down and use 1/4 inch crown staples, 1 inch long, every 6 inches along the perimeter and 8 inches in the field. A few things to note: Make sure the subfloor is secured before using the Luan. Make sure there are no protrusions from ...


2

I just did my concrete floor for vinyl plank, and I would be concerned more for the flatness the the floor that it is within the tolerances needed. The bumps can be scraped off, at worst ground off. When I poured mine, I had high spots that needed ground down, quite the dusty job. The holes in the mix from the air bubbles will be of no concern, the flooring ...


2

If you read James Hardie installation you need to thinset the board down with modified thinset so over cork no don't do it


2

Luan plywood tends to have a ton of resin and other chemicals in it (due mostly to the species of wood used). This can leach out and stain tile grout or vinyl flooring (or cause adhesive issues due to salts, etc.). It's a very soft plywood, so it may not have enough rigidity to support the floor and prevent dents. It tends to have voids in the interior ...


2

One method, like in this YouTube video, would be to use heat bond carpet seaming tape. Pro carpet installers use it with a special iron to seam carpet together, but you can use a clothes iron since you will be working on the back side. This would give a strong bond but you will still need a rug pad to keep it from sliding around. (The heat seal tape has a ...


2

Professional flooring installers would flood from the high point to the low point with self level. They typically charge per bag and I've seen this kind of job cost 15k when done for more than one level of a house. You can do as you suggest a hybrid approach. Installers won't typically go that route because it is a lot more labor and requires a lot more ...


2

I think it would totally impossible to get good results using that method. LVT is pretty flexible. I've remodeled a rental house and personally (not a contractor) installed LVT. It turned out pretty good, but I did need a leveling compound for part of the floor. Our church also replaced a bunch of carpet in the hallways with LVT and the installer missed a ...


1

I quite literally did this exact same thing a few years ago. First ensure that all of your structural posts have support beneath the house to foundation. Then I got decking screws and screwed the planks down everywhere they were already nailed. Then I bought about 50 sheets of CCX ply and lots of subfloor glue. I glued and nailed ply over the entire floor ...


1

Your underlayment is particle board and is not suitable for ceramic tile. Most tile mortars specifically disallow bonding to particle board. Replace the underlayment with 1/2" cement board or 1/2" (or thicker) CDX plywood, or overlay 1/4" cement board if finished height isn't a concern. Either option should be screwed down thoroughly using corrosion-...


1

I don't know why you would've been advised to glue or lock a floating floor down. This a very bad idea & could make the floor cup or ridge if the floor can't move. Parquet is very different in being extremely small pieces with extremely small omnidirectional movement in a whole lot of very small areas. Having no underlayment is the typical way & ...


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