Hot answers tagged

35

The hammering action of the drill isn't activating So the bit is overheating due to friction. It is supposed to hammer the material you're drilling into dust then evacuate it, not rub it off through friction. You have to activate the hammer action. Pretty much the only use cases for not using the hammer action are when drilling into ceramic tile to avoid ...


30

Hire a core driller. Trust me and do it. You will regret doing this yourself and the cost will seem like nothing in comparison to your struggles with drilling a hole that size in solid concrete. probably cost you 200 bucks. You can rent one from a tool rental company, or even from home depot.... https://www.homedepot.com/tool-truck-rental/Small-Core-...


18

The tile floor shouldn't be a structural weakness, but if it's glazed you won't get a good mortar bond. I'd install anchor bolts every 32" or so, aligned with block cores, and fill those cores with mortar. It might be easier to simply cut the tile inside the wall line and remove it, though. Also be aware that your slab may not be designed to carry a ...


15

Use a diamond core drill to get a nice clean hole. If you use a hammer drill and carbide drill bit the concrete on the opposite side is going to splay and look like like a beaver was chewing on the wall, not professional at all. You can rent the core drills at most commercial rental places and you will be through the wall in a matter of minutes with a nice ...


13

One way is by looking at the bond of the bricks. Your bricks are arranged in a running bond or stretcher bond, which is always one brick thick: To be a structural brick wall it would have to be more than one brick thick, or have multiple wythes, and you would see headers, like this: It's likely your walls are wood-framed with single-wythe brick veneer on ...


13

Trying to mount an articulating arm that is designed to mount to a single stud will not stand up mounted to that type of wall construction. Even with long lag bolts there is just too much chance that mount will move around and cut into the drywall, become loose and make a mess of things. What you should be doing is to mount a panel of good quality 3/4" ...


8

If you don't have the proper structure under the area, you're not going to want to use full sized bricks for this project. Brick walls require proper concrete footings to support the massive amount of weight, if you don't have the ability to add the footings you won't be able to build a brick wall here. In situations like this, veneer will likely be your ...


8

The frame is of wood. The brick is a cladding on the outside. It is not a veneer. A veneer is fake layer of thin brick-like parquets that are secured with a cement or glue to a backing of some kind. In other words a stone or brick veneer does not have full-sized bricks. Your house does have full-size bricks, but they are not used for structural purposes. It ...


8

NO, NO, NO, never install concrete block on tile. You don’t say what kind of tile is installed on your concrete slab, but it doesn’t matter if it’s “ceramic tile” or “terra-cotta tile” or “porcelain tile” or “stone” or “slate”. Regardless, you’ll have future problems because: 1) differing strength in compression, 2) different expansion coefficients, 3) ...


8

I believe that is called a spring pin anchor or express nail To remove it, I'd try these: or any nail puller. Spraying some Liquid Wrench or other light lubricant might make it easier to pull out, but also slippery to hold onto, and might make an oily rusty stain.


8

A standard brick is 8" x 2.25" x 3.5". Ignore the 3.5" as that's how thick the wall will be. 8" * 2.25" is 18 sq. in. A square foot is 144 sq. in. (12 * 12). 144 sq. in. divided by 18 sq. in. is 8. But I left out the mortar. It's possible that the mortar on six bricks is equal to about two bricks. Another way of looking at this is that each brick is ...


8

For a bore hole that large, your best bet is a water-cooled diamond bore. There are many rental centers that can rent you the tool and the bore.


8

An SDS-plus hammer drill will make holes very fast using a bit that starts hardly sharp and rapidly becomes completely dull. It really doesn't care, because it's a pneumatic hammer action and the rotary action is just to clear away the dust. (It also works with masonry chisel bits if you turn the rotation off. An "ordinary" hammer/non-hammer drill had a ...


8

The hammering action of the drill linked in the picture doesn't really need anything more than turning the dial to the hammer setting - it doesn't selectively "activate." It should be pretty noticeable but nothing that's going to bounce you out of your shorts. The mechanism is usually something like two plastic poker chips rotating, which gives you some ...


7

Mortar is not waterproof. However, there are products that can be applied to mortar (and other concrete materials), that can make the mortar waterproof.


7

Looking at the Milwaukee web site the chuck capacity refers to the largest solid bit (hole diameter) the drill is capable of drilling. They are referring to using a solid bit not a hole saw. If you notice, that diameter increases as the power of the drill increases along with the price. That is not to say that you can't drill a hole larger than the rated ...


6

If by HMA you mean Hot-Melt Adhesive, that stuff is for arts & crafts, not construction. You should be using construction adhesive. LOCTITE®, LIQUID NAILS®, DAP®, and possibly other adhesive manufacturers offer a molding adhesive.


6

It occurred to me that this project might benefit from a single piece stone cap and eliminate lintel altogether. You could incorporate a bit of slope and weather proof the structure. A stone supply house could fashion it out of limestone. More traditional lintel: This window drawing is pretty analogous to a mailbox opening: You are probably building a ...


6

Quikrete FASTSET Repair Mortar is a great product. The biggest difference between it and a typical type S mortar is that it is "fastset" (duh) meaning it will be hard in about 20 min. Not cured, but hardened. And that it is intended for commercial use as it will eventually reach 6000 psi after it's full 28 day cure. This product does not need any bonding ...


6

Concrete is strongest when the mix is as dry as possible, and weaker when the mix is wetter. A highly liquid mix is therefore almost always a bad idea. This is well understood/documented/tested in the industry, tends to be poorly understood by homeowners and some of the less educated pros. Likewise, the importance of plenty of water for the curing process ...


6

I did this once. All of the previous answers are valid, but if you're trying to do this through an 8" or thinner concrete wall "on the cheap", don't mind investing a significant chunk of time, and have some DIY skills and access to, or funding for, some modest tools, you can do the following: Get a 1/2" variable-speed hammer drill, a 1/4" carbide-tipped (...


6

Make sure you have not accidentally set the drill in reverse mode. When the bit rotates the wrong way it causes the bit to heat up and wear out. Something similar to this happened to a friend and to myself.


5

It is efflorescence. Water picks up minerals in the mortar and transports them until the water evaporates, leaving the minerals behind. Other than cosmetic issues, this is normally harmless, though if the process continues for a long period, enough minerals can be removed that the mortar sort of rots. Only close inspection will indicate if the mortar is ...


5

Considering how little exposure you will get to the mortar for your small project, you're probably fine with just your work gloves. Wearing latex gloves under your work gloves will provide additional protection. I would suggest that for the people who will be working directly with the mortar. Big picture, more important than gloves is breathing protection. ...


5

Open a window and measure from the face of the brick to the inside wall. If it's 14 plus inches, that's at least two courses of brick. It will be obvious if it is; questionable if it's any less thick than that. One brick (4") and a 2x4 stud wall = ~8" Two bricks and a stud = ~12" Add 1" if it's lath and plaster; add 1/2" for drywall. Allow another 1/2" ...


4

Cement surface and even paint (scarifed with 50 grit belt sander or similar) can stay, if both are well adhered.. An experiment is in order: Use a good quality thinset, (Laticrete Platinum 254 or Custom Flexbond) Trowel on 1/4 inch patch (4in x 4in or so). Wait 24 hours Chip off patch with a chisel Observe the removed thinset: If it cleaves off ...


4

Just get replacement windows instead of new construction and use tapcons to fasten the windows through the sides. Caulk outside good to keep out water. Foundation should also be graded away from the window to keep out water.


4

They make them. Not concrete blocks per se but other precast concrete units. You'll need to find out if you're local suppliers carry them or you have a precast stone manufacturer near you. The family of products you're talking about, which includes not only the half round but other shapes, are called concrete coping stones. That should help you ask around ...


4

Paint difficulties can be resolved by scraping and priming with a shellac or oil based primed. I prefer the polyurethane based construction adhesives for strength and toughness. Their down side is cure time (overnight) Another scheme would be to cut back the plaster to 75% of the baseboard height with a diamond blade in an angle grinder (yes, very messy: ...


4

Insulation value of masonry walls vs wood-frame walls You should be able to find guidance. For example Scottish Guidance, UK Guidance In the UK, I believe regulations specify maximum U-values U-values are measured in watts per square metre per degree Kelvin (W/m²K). So for example, if we consider a double glazed window with a U-value of 2.8, for every ...


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