Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
23

The best approach is a tile saw that can make small precise cuts along the length of a tile. It is a power tool like a table saw but uses a diamond impregnated blade and a water cooling system. They can be bought or rented. A cruder approach if the tiles are not too big (4x4 should not be a problem)and there are not too many tiles to cut is a tile nipper. ...


20

Like Greebo says, you want to get back down to the concrete, but I'd suggest that more to have a flat surface to build on top of. To make the job go faster, you can use a power tool. Several would get the job done: Power Chisel (best fit for the job): Air Hammer (you'd need a high capacity air compressor): Demo Hammer (more power than you need, but it ...


16

I own a pair of tile nippers - I bought them first, they were cheap. Unfortunately, they didn't work (pretty much "at all") on the tiles I was using - breaks would be more or less random. So I bought one of these dry diamond blades for an angle grinder - if you don't own an angle grinder, this might just be one of the few times I'd say that the cheapest ...


15

Having done this exact thing recently, I found that using the hard metal brush attachment for the angle grinder worked very well to remove thinset without affecting the concrete beneath it. I'd lean towards the stiffer bristles. Be sure to wet the thinset before starting, and as needed. The thinset comes off like mud, leaving clean concrete. Once finished, ...


10

Well it depends on the output of the radiant floor, but in general yes they are sufficient to heat a room. We have underfloor heating (hot water with heat spreader plates under floorboards) in our upstairs rooms and they warm the rooms quite well. The floors are warm to touch (as would be expected). The temperature of the room is more uniform the heat is ...


9

In most cases the cost is directly related to expected durability. In expensive commercial/professional grade tools, parts spin on ball bearings and motors are more powerful. They are designed to run allday every day at maximum speed where time is money. Home owner grade tools typically are designed to be used for brief periods of time and at less than ...


9

By "no other covering over it" - I assume you mean you didn't properly prep the sub floor, and so you put down ceramic tile over an uneven surface. Which means you didn't "develop" an air bubble (an air bubble won't form under inflexible ceramic tile like it will under vinyl), but rather, you put the tile down over voids, so there was nothing to support the ...


8

According to the sealant data sheet, you can seal new grout after 48 hours. For me I would play it safe if I could (do you have to be able to use this bathroom?), if the grout says no water for 7 days I would wait that long before sealing. That is probably overly cautious but then I don't get much work done during the week anyway so for me waiting until ...


7

The answer is, "if you want to do it properly, yes". You're going to find it near impossible to get a good base to lay tile on if you try to apply thinset overtop of old thinset. You may find it actually easier to remove the subfloor completely (cut it out with a circ saw set to the depth of the subfloor) and replace it to give yourself a clean surface on ...


7

What's done is done. I'd grout and generally move on with life, and only revisit it if and when the tiles start popping on their own, which may never happen. You are NOT a professional tile installer who would be well advised to rip out and do it over for the sake of their reputation. So you don't need to act like one.


7

Use the “wet saw” for free at the place you bought the tiles. The store will usually include one cut per item bought for no charge. That’s what I’ve done (at one of the big-box stores). If you can’t get that where you bought, take them to the store which does have such a saw and pay 10¢ – 20¢ per cut.


6

After calling the rental places and comparing what I have done (using a cold chisle and hammer) to the results I would anticipate with a power chisle, I opted for the cheaper (and now added tool to the tool chest) of a $39 Royobi 4.5" angle grinder. I attached a two row Dimond cutting cup about $40. At Matthew PK's suggestion to water the floor down, it did ...


6

The question is about electric radiant floor heating. I, too, have hot water radiant floor heating...it is CHEAP, and the MOST efficient way to heat a room. The electric floor "sheets" that are put down prior to tile, are not an efficient way to heat an entire room...very expensive to run for a long period of time, and not "green". However, it is an ...


6

Unfortunately, you NEED to remove or cover the old vinyl. If you attempt to tile over an unsecure base, you are wasting yout time and money because the tile will not stay down. In your case, if you go over the splitting vinyl, the vinyl will continue to separate and up will come the tiles. If you go over the paper layer, the mortar/quickset will not stick ...


6

4-1/4" and some larger wall tiles have bumps cast in that act as spacers. Unless you want a larger gap, no additional spacers are needed. Whether your particular tile has them is uncertain. They're often necessary to prevent sagging with heavier tile while the mortar or mastic sets.


6

This is a really really poor installation. Everything will have to be pulled up. Tiles will need to be cleaned or thrown away and reinstall. Issues: The mortar/cement isn't even covering under the mesh in some pictures. To do this type of install you need to cement/mortar the mesh to the floor and a skim coat on top. Once this dries you can continue ...


5

Check your Tile bit to see if you have melted the edge. normally it should feel nice and sharp against your finger. Hopefully you have a nice drill (generally battery operated may be a little on the light side). What I do, is get a straw filled with water, or a spray bottle, and get a helper to either "pipette" or spray water onto the hole while you drill....


5

If all interior walls or, if insulated exterior walls,no need to fill gap with anything. Just get your baseboard moldings up to finish the job


5

You need a diamond tile saw, where you put the tile on a platform and slide it past the water-cooled blade. They are fast, precise and good for the hardest porcelain tiles. Expect to pay $300 and up. Straight cuts are the easiest. To cut out a square corner, make the two cuts with the tile upside down. The back of the tile will be a mess, but the business-...


5

This greatly depends on the type tile you have. If it is a manmade tile such as porcelain, or ceramic, then you don't have to worry about sealing it. Most natural stone tiles, especially softer or water permeable stone such as marble, limestone/travertine, and slate should be sealed as well. This would ideally be done prior to grouting to prevent the stone ...


5

Silicone caulk or silicone RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanizing) glue (pretty much the same thing with different labels.) Sticks pretty well, moisture helps it cure, and it can be peeled off when you want it gone.


4

In the to-do section of the care instructions you posted, it suggests "Use an all-purpose, non-oil based household or commercial cleaner." OR, it says, you can use vinegar/water. I think you are over-analyzing. The normal floor mopping solutions like Pine-Sol or a Swiffer will work fine. Just don't use anything abrasive that will scratch the tile or an ...


4

Is the glue residue hard and rough or soft and gummy? If it's hard, a 6" floor scraper should break it loose, maybe with a heat gun or some boiling water to loosen it a bit. If it's soft and gummy, the scraper should get it by itself, or you can try some acetone or mineral spirits to dissolve it (make sure you ventilate the area well, and take frequent ...


4

That's not actually "cement as glue", that's a cement-based compound modified with various trade secret components for better plasticity and adhesion. It's usually called "thin-set mortar" and it's widely widespread. Since we likely live in different regions I'd rather not recommend any brand to you - you have your local brands.


4

Cement surface and even paint (scarifed with 50 grit belt sander or similar) can stay, if both are well adhered.. An experiment is in order: Use a good quality thinset, (Laticrete Platinum 254 or Custom Flexbond) Trowel on 1/4 inch patch (4in x 4in or so). Wait 24 hours Chip off patch with a chisel Observe the removed thinset: If it cleaves off ...


4

$65 at Harbor Freight or other import discounter. You are wasting your time with a scoring cutter. If you had a lot to do I would recommend a quality domestic saw, but for a one time job this saw will work so well you will kick yourself for not biting the bullet and buying one before you even started the job.


4

I would recommend heavy duty constructive adhesive followed by grout colored caulk that best matche the grout around the tiles https://www.google.com/search?q=grout+colored+caulk to minimize cost and work I would risk using the caulk as glue try to remove the old adhesive clean back of tile and wall well put a lot of construction adhesive on the back of ...


4

Dremel with a grinding wheel or a carbide cutoff blade. Do this OUTSIDE with a N95 mask, goggles, gloves and try to control the shards (arrange so the spray goes into a towel or use a wet/dry vac).


4

Tile mortar is actually fairly soft. If you have access to a belt sander, take a coarse grit to it. Otherwise, scrape at it with a robust flat tool like a cold chisel.


4

I had posted this as a comment but believe it should be an answer. Wow to me from that photo this is a full blown broken tile not a hair line crack that you would see in a natural stone. This porcelain tile should have no broken tiles. I hope you have not made the final payment and if you have contact your local contractors board this is unacceptable in my ...


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