6

The thinset and mesh tape are to strengthen the seams. If you are going to tile over the cement board, you should tape the seams. This should not be that difficult. Pack in thinset, lay on the tape, and flat-knife to get it set in. In the corners, use a corner knife. If you just want to leave the corners untreated that will probably be fine, because that ...


4

After scoring, place the sheet on the floor as usual, then cover the thin strip with a stiff board or straight stud as long as the score line. Align one edge of the board with the score. Kneel, or have someone stand, on the board. Pull up on the larger piece. In other words, score and snap as usual, but trap the thin piece between your work surface and a ...


4

1710 lbs, 1.9 psf for each 1/4" 3'x5' sheet. You're correct about 60 pieces per unit. Durock Spec Sheet Showing my math: 3' x 5' = 15 square feet 15 square feet x 1.9 pounds per square feet = 28.5 pounds per sheet 28.5 pounds per sheet x 60 sheets per unit = 1710 pounds


3

There is a link to a complete installation guide for this type of fiber cement board at the supplier link in your posting. From that guide it says: Always cut the material outdoors. Never cut the material indoors. Never dry sweep accumulated dust - Use wet suppression or HEPA Vacuum. For the outdoor application: Position the cutting ...


3

You may break a few pieces(of marble) just picking them up. A skim coat on either side of the joint will help. Block feather with a concrete 'rubbing' block. My marble floor always have Schluter Ditra under them. I also use it with any questionable floor. Ceramic tile can tolerate L/360 deflection, stone is twice as sensitive at L/720. If you have any ...


3

All cement products contain silicates, from the sand use in the cement. It won't be breathable unless you create dust by cutting or breaking the panels. That being said, I don't see instructions for using Kerdi Board for flooring in the Schluter product data. It could be there and I just missed it, but I'm not seeing it. Schluter is actually pretty good ...


3

According to the James Hardie Website FAQ, either side is fine to use. However, they recommend smooth side to be up and nailed every 8" on center.


3

Thinset is approved for use over sheetrock - sheetrock typically has drywall compound on it. If you were using a large format tile with a specific thinset that wasn't approved for use over sheetrock you might have issues.


2

A membrane (whether thin sheet or liquid) applied over the backerboard, is a vastly superior means of waterproofing, This is because it sits immediately under the tile, as opposed to behind the backer. Red Guard and HydroBan are some liquid membranes and Kerdi and NobleFlex are thin sheet membranes.


2

I did go ahead and pour a board, and have the results. I was told sand filler instead of gravel for <= 2". I went with just the default sand filler blend and thin steel rebar mesh (wire basically) at my local hardware store. A 1.5" board that was about 4.5" wide and supported at 2' intervals supported 110 pounds. I had decided prior that 80 lbs would be ...


2

The reason for cement board is to give a good adhesion surface and to increase stability. When a floor flexes from the weight of people walking, or from movement of the house, grout and even the tiles themselves can crack. For a temporary platform intended for a cat box, you're not looking at a lot of weight causing flexing, so I doubt there'd be much ...


2

You could order an Asbestos test kit online, and find out. The results are probably as accurate, if not more accurate than the answers you'll get from a random community of people on the internet. PRO-LAB® offers just such an Asbestos Test Kit. I have no affiliation with PRO-LAB® or any of it's products, and do not recommend or endorse any of their ...


2

You don't have to use a backerboard on shower ceilings - especially if you aren't tiling it. You can drywall it. If you do use a backer board I would suggest Hardieboard. You would then just put a skim coat of joint compound (mud) over and sand.


2

Here is an idea to consider. If the tile comes off the cement board fairly easy, you could leave the cement board, scrape off the thinset and lay your foam and laminate over the cement board. Just a thought depending on the overall thickness you need to achieve.


2

I had a similar situation where the backer board extended a few inches past my planned tiling edge in my shower. After I had finished with the tile, I taped the joint and applied joint compound over the backer board and it seems great. It's been three years and there is no cracking or any problem with it. That's not exactly an answer but I hope it helps you ...


2

The Hardibacker or cement board should overlap the tub flange down to about ¼" to ½" above the tub itself. Then bring your tile down to around ⅛" from the tub and finally caulk that joint for a good seal. The way you have it now will fail and allow water between the backer and tub and into the framing. Gaps to be caulked should be kept to less than ¼" ...


2

If possible I would take down the hardibacker and furr out the studs the 1/4" or so. Even with tile over it the possibility of water getting behind the tub is high and it defeats the purpose of the flange.


2

Given that this if for inside application the first thing I would state is to follow the manufacture's instructions. Depending on the stone weight you will have different install methods. However... given no info from manufacturer: I would not cement board over drywall. You would have to use longer screw of course but the fact that the screw isn't ...


2

As long as the cement board is solid with no large cracks it is useable. The stains may have occurred for any number of reasons. Also the cement board should be flat and even with no ridges. And do not worry if they feel or look wet, moisture won't effect it.


2

Cement board and fibercement siding (such as that from GAF or Hardie) are very different things. I'd never have considered cement board as an exterior product, especially in a climate with severe freeze/thaw cycles. I'd expect it to simply disintegrate as it'll absorb moisture readily. Also, to cut that into siding shingles would be a monumental task, ...


2

For a vertical application movement is a bigger concern that weight carrying ability. If the cement board is framed well (studs every foot) with no load I think it would be fine. For what it's worth: I did a woodstove surround on 1/2" drywall spaced from the surrounding wall by 1/2" using 1" wide scraps of drywall every 8 inches. used mastic and 1/4" ...


2

You can use a circular saw. There is a blade for cement board, if it is just one cut or two you can sacrifice an old blade. it will dull very quickly. This will create copious amounts of dust, it is extremely important to wear a mask and safety goggles. You should also use a shop vac to minimize dust.


2

There is another way that doesn't require sawing. All you need are two 2x8s with a 1/2 inch plywood spacer between them at each end, joined securely with several 3" screws, so that there is a 1/2 inch gap between the two boards. Lay this flat on the floor. Slip the section you want to cut off between the 2x8s with the scored cut line on top, EXACTLY on ...


2

No, you do not need to remove the drywall to install the sauna. However, you will need a foil barrier (to reflect the heat back into the sauna) installed over the drywall. I'd install insulation on the wall too, to isolate the sauna from the house. The reason you use cedar boards is because the room will heat up and expand then contract making big cracks ...


2

Don't worry as much about the drywall mud. As you said, fibatape #4. Do that first. For #3, set your bead in drywall mud. Then, finish the drywall side in drywall mud and the upper side above the showerhead in drywall mud. Feather the lower portion of the bead out with thinset, just to keep everything on plane. Personally, I like to also paper tape the bead ...


2

You can read my past answers that go into pretty big detail on how I do showers - and I have done a lot but there are no hard rules in creating a working/functional non-molding shower. Yes there are guidelines but they are written in an in-general way and do not factor in materials being used. Number one you used hardieboard. It is my preferred choice for ...


2

Taping creates a fire barrier if there ever happened to be a fire in your wall a non taped joint could be a problem.


2

Cement board isn't intended as a finished floor. It's not as dense as concrete. You'd find high heels and chair legs punching into it in short order, leaving you with a crumbly mess. Obviously you'd also have to tape all the seams and skim the screw holes, but you'd still have air voids across the entire surface to deal with. I'd try epoxy over good (...


1

The proper installation order: vapor barrier, backer-board, tile. Secondly, since this isn't a drywall/wood wall, the backer-board would protrude the tiles off the wall about 1/2 an inch, this is easily fixed at the top where there is a tile moulding but was wondering if there were any other elegant solutions? I'm not sure that I understand this problem, ...


1

I would not leave a gap, and use screws long enough to reach through the plywood through the backer board. Make sure the flange is well supported or you'll have problems with it down the road if not immediately. Maybe an even better solution would be to have plywood of the right thickness span the gap between the subfloor and the flange, and still use ...


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