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22

The cause is simply nature. You've got wood that's outside. It gets wet, the wet stays in the wood, the wood rots. This happens when wood is left outside in an area where water can get stuck and the wood wasn't properly installed (no caulk) and isn't properly maintained (not regularly painted/caulked). Much of the rot seems to start near places where ...


16

I use a painters multi tool to pry loose baseboards. Its wider and thickeer than a putty knife. It also has a hard place on the end of the handle where its meant to be tapped with a hammer. I find it pretty handy.


15

It depends on a couple of things. How much time you want to invest, how your current baseboards are installed, size of current baseboards, and what you want everything to look like. As long as it isn't a HUGE deal to take baseboards out I would almost always go with removing them. Your finish will look better. No quarter round looks way more professional....


15

If it's structural (the tread/risers are supported by it), it's called a stringer. If it's not structural, it's called skirting (or simply a skirt). Source (PDF)


14

The flooring is supposed to extend far enough under the door trim molding so that no sub-floor is visible. The gap you have is non-standard and is completely unacceptable. Presumably you have some scraps of flooring left. The installer should scrape out the filler and insert a piece of flooring into the gap. EDIT To be able to work in the scrap of ...


14

While re-doing the floor to go under the trim would be desirable, a hack might make things worse. My best suggestion is a square edge plinth block to cover the mess. Maybe you'll have to do that with a few adjacent doors to match up, but it's an extremely easy fix.


12

Dimensions on your photo would help make a better model, but here is what I might do in this situation. The easy way End the upper trim with a bevel (30-45°) at the edge of the stair, then continue in the lower room as normal. Transition You may want to use a transition piece to pull the pieces together. You could even cut an angle into the top of ...


10

I think you're on the right track. I'd apply enough glue so some squeezes out, wipe the face with a damp towel to remove the residue, and either clamp it or wrap it with blue painters tape until dry. Just make sure that the wood remains flat and not bowed when you clamp it. After the joint is dry, remove the tape or clamps, and you should be good to go. ...


10

Baseboards should be installed after laminate. Most (all?) Laminate is a floating flooring system which means it doesn't actually attach to the subfloor (friction holds it in place once all the pieces are set together. As a result, it will expand/contract a bit with temperature/humidity changes in the house. Because of this, you have to leave a small (...


9

Although this is sort of an arbitrary question, and might get flagged, I'll pen a few thoughts. There are no real rules to chair rails, I've installed them from 28 to 38 inches. Traditionally, some feature, like a window sill or a side board dictates the height so the lines flow around the room. But I always say, "beauty is in the eyes of the beholder". If ...


9

In your situation, I'd use reducer molding instead of T molding:


9

Trim is a general term, often used to describe all types of molding and millwork. Casing is a type of molding, typically used to trim the perimeter of windows and doors. Casing is typically less wide (tall?), but thicker than base molding. 11/16" x 2 1/4" Base molding (or baseboard) is a type of molding, which is applied where the wall and floor meet. 9/...


9

Because that's what wood does, especially when exposed to regular and/or prolonged moisture. The lack of gable overhangs on the home are a factor. Even cedar and other rot-resistant species have their lifespans, and apparently 25 years is it in your climate. You'll need to replace the boards (or the portions that are decaying) with properly treated or ...


9

It's hard to say for sure without pulling it apart but your pictures suggest to me that you have water getting behind the wood at that corner. The reason I think this might be the case is that you basically have no visible problem except at the bottom of the board where it intersects with a horizontal piece. What I mean to say here is that this looks to me ...


8

I ended up taking advise from @chris's answer and making my own transition from actual flooring. I cut away part of the flooring to make the transition piece sit flush on the floor and then on top of the tile. I then routed a rounded edge so the piece on top of the tile flowed down more gradually. I was a little worried about the routed part and how it ...


8

Measure in a foot or so from one inside corner and make a mark. Then measure from the opposite corner to your mark. Add the two measurements together for the full length. Note that this process is shown with pictures over on the blog.


8

There needs to be a 1/4" gap next to all walls to allow the flooring room to expand. This gap should be covered with trim of some sort. The problem with baseboard alone, is that most baseboard is 3/8" thick, leaving only an 1/8" of an inch for the wood to contract without exposing the edge. This also assumes that the flooring is laid with tremendous ...


8

3/8-5/8" but most 1/2" Reasoning: you have padding and carpet. With a plush carpet and pad you might be at almost an inch or even over. you don't want the tuck to be so tight that it looks like the carpet is being smashed under the baseboards. The carpet should look like it is just flowing under. Note that most floors aren't exactly flat. So make sure ...


7

What is important when nailing crown molding is hitting a solid background. This can be plates for small crowns or studs. What I prefer to do is add a profile (triangle) piece of scrap wood, such as mitered plywood or ripped 2X4 stock into the corner and nail it into the plates and studs. No problem if you miss or have to use a lot of nails to find a good ...


7

General practice is going 6 inches above molded area and cut it out. You must inspect the backside of the drywall. If you can't you need to keep cutting out until you hit 6 inches of unaffected wall. You then need to follow a mold remediation plan - not sure how anything else in the wall looks but useless replacing the drywall if you will put up new ...


7

Really too dangerous cutting small base shoe molding with a circular saw. It is so easy to cut that you should just buy one of those cheap wooden miter boxes that you use with a fine toothed back saw. Sometimes these even come with the saw as a kit.


7

We like it for bathrooms and other wet environments. It nails perfectly normally with an air nailer (usually 18g). The only thing is that you can't cut it slowly, as it'll melt and you'll end up with a blobby mess at your cut. Cut briskly and all is fine.


7

If you can no longer see the openings in the drywall your contractor did a good job, molding is there to cover the ends at the floor and edges at openings so there is no need to go back it will not change anything as every house I have remodeled and built has some spaces that are covered by molding.


7

We require “back priming”. That means pre-paint all surfaces before the trim is installed...especially cut ends. End grain on trim sucks up moisture more than side grain.


6

The step are: Sand pre-primed trim Install trim Putty nail holes and caulk top of trim and any other place at the edge of the wood. Window stops, quarter round, casing, door stops . The only exception is where the floor meets the base. Sand out putty. If you spray the trim, tape off all windows. Paint trim. If brushed, add paint additive Floetrol to reduce ...


6

The key criteria for me is the size of the holes. If you used brads, then I have no problem with using caulk, especially on baseboards. The only possible downside is if you leave a fingerprint in it. You have to have eagle eyes to pick out a small hole like that. With crown molding though, I'd plan on a lightweight spackle. Mostly because of the cost ...


6

You might have some more flexibility if you went with aluminum. Something like this: Or this:


6

If you are serious about this project, you have two options: 1) Scour various retailers and specialty stores (and the internet?) for a moulding match at an appropriate price. 2) Take a sample of your moulding to a professional millwork shops and they can match it. Option 2 will likely be pricey depending on the complexity of the work piece. We had ...


6

If you are renovating the whole house, or at least a good portion of it, I would purchase a nail gun over renting it or borrowing it. Owning it lets you use it when you need it, not like going to get a rental and returning it or being responsible for somebody elses' property. Get the compressor too, it does more than power nailers, it fills tires, blows dust ...


6

To answer your specific questions, you shouldn't assume spring angle is 45 degrees. Put a framing square on the flats of the crown and you'll know if it's symmetrical or 38/52. To cut this flat, your bevel and miter angles are somewhere in the 30 degree range. See the link below to figure the actual numbers. Since your saw doesn't flop both ways, you might ...


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