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35

When putting a narrow item on a wall hang it level. When putting a wide/long item on the wall hang it parallel to the floor or ceiling, whichever is nearer. The eye can see a picture frame askew because it just doesn't "look right." But something long like a 10 foot long dry erase board, a wide painting.. or trim work like baseboard or crown ...


22

The cause is simply nature. You've got wood that's outside. It gets wet, the wet stays in the wood, the wood rots. This happens when wood is left outside in an area where water can get stuck and the wood wasn't properly installed (no caulk) and isn't properly maintained (not regularly painted/caulked). Much of the rot seems to start near places where ...


15

It depends on a couple of things. How much time you want to invest, how your current baseboards are installed, size of current baseboards, and what you want everything to look like. As long as it isn't a HUGE deal to take baseboards out I would almost always go with removing them. Your finish will look better. No quarter round looks way more professional....


15

If it's structural (the tread/risers are supported by it), it's called a stringer. If it's not structural, it's called skirting (or simply a skirt). Source (PDF)


14

The flooring is supposed to extend far enough under the door trim molding so that no sub-floor is visible. The gap you have is non-standard and is completely unacceptable. Presumably you have some scraps of flooring left. The installer should scrape out the filler and insert a piece of flooring into the gap. EDIT To be able to work in the scrap of ...


14

While re-doing the floor to go under the trim would be desirable, a hack might make things worse. My best suggestion is a square edge plinth block to cover the mess. Maybe you'll have to do that with a few adjacent doors to match up, but it's an extremely easy fix.


12

I would just replace the trim. If you were good with an oscillating saw or sharp wood chisel you could cut the molding just above the damaged area at an angle. Remove everything from there down. When you take out the lower piece try to keep a piece that is undamaged so you can take it with you when you go searching for replacement trim. Hard to tell from ...


10

Baseboards should be installed after laminate. Most (all?) Laminate is a floating flooring system which means it doesn't actually attach to the subfloor (friction holds it in place once all the pieces are set together. As a result, it will expand/contract a bit with temperature/humidity changes in the house. Because of this, you have to leave a small (...


10

If that leg can be unscrewed and moved over 1/2 inch, that would be my first choice. If not, then I'd get a coping saw and cut the leg to fit the trim.


9

Because that's what wood does, especially when exposed to regular and/or prolonged moisture. The lack of gable overhangs on the home are a factor. Even cedar and other rot-resistant species have their lifespans, and apparently 25 years is it in your climate. You'll need to replace the boards (or the portions that are decaying) with properly treated or ...


9

You're right that they're merely decorative. They're often a separate molding that lays over another board or molding. They can be removed or covered without issue. I do think it's a loss of nice detail, though. It's that sort of thing that gives a house the richness of aesthetic yours has. Shame it has to go for the sake of convenience.


9

They don't have to be level, they have to look straight. This can actually get quite complicated when doing tile or vinyl planking (especially those with no underlayment). If you have "rooms" and the basement broken up a bit this shouldn't be a big issue. Try to get trim in one piece for each wall - if it isn't then set each wall and take a ...


8

There needs to be a 1/4" gap next to all walls to allow the flooring room to expand. This gap should be covered with trim of some sort. The problem with baseboard alone, is that most baseboard is 3/8" thick, leaving only an 1/8" of an inch for the wood to contract without exposing the edge. This also assumes that the flooring is laid with tremendous ...


8

3/8-5/8" but most 1/2" Reasoning: you have padding and carpet. With a plush carpet and pad you might be at almost an inch or even over. you don't want the tuck to be so tight that it looks like the carpet is being smashed under the baseboards. The carpet should look like it is just flowing under. Note that most floors aren't exactly flat. So make sure ...


8

It's hard to say for sure without pulling it apart but your pictures suggest to me that you have water getting behind the wood at that corner. The reason I think this might be the case is that you basically have no visible problem except at the bottom of the board where it intersects with a horizontal piece. What I mean to say here is that this looks to me ...


8

An oscillating tool is your friend. It looks like it would reach to the bottom nail. Looks like you were able to pull the top of the board out enough to get to the bottom nail. You also may be able to break it with a chisel, but nails are hard. Get some good blades for the osc tool, I found that a cheap blade only cuts 5-10 nails. https://www.homedepot.com/...


7

General practice is going 6 inches above molded area and cut it out. You must inspect the backside of the drywall. If you can't you need to keep cutting out until you hit 6 inches of unaffected wall. You then need to follow a mold remediation plan - not sure how anything else in the wall looks but useless replacing the drywall if you will put up new ...


7

Really too dangerous cutting small base shoe molding with a circular saw. It is so easy to cut that you should just buy one of those cheap wooden miter boxes that you use with a fine toothed back saw. Sometimes these even come with the saw as a kit.


7

We like it for bathrooms and other wet environments. It nails perfectly normally with an air nailer (usually 18g). The only thing is that you can't cut it slowly, as it'll melt and you'll end up with a blobby mess at your cut. Cut briskly and all is fine.


7

If you can no longer see the openings in the drywall your contractor did a good job, molding is there to cover the ends at the floor and edges at openings so there is no need to go back it will not change anything as every house I have remodeled and built has some spaces that are covered by molding.


7

We require “back priming”. That means pre-paint all surfaces before the trim is installed...especially cut ends. End grain on trim sucks up moisture more than side grain.


6

If you are renovating the whole house, or at least a good portion of it, I would purchase a nail gun over renting it or borrowing it. Owning it lets you use it when you need it, not like going to get a rental and returning it or being responsible for somebody elses' property. Get the compressor too, it does more than power nailers, it fills tires, blows dust ...


6

To answer your specific questions, you shouldn't assume spring angle is 45 degrees. Put a framing square on the flats of the crown and you'll know if it's symmetrical or 38/52. To cut this flat, your bevel and miter angles are somewhere in the 30 degree range. See the link below to figure the actual numbers. Since your saw doesn't flop both ways, you might ...


6

The problems I see are the bottom nails nailed into the baseboard. Get a keyhole saw or single handle hack saw, see picture below, and cut those bottom nails. Then pull the baseboard straight up. Use a pair a vise grips to yank the nail stubs out of the wall. If you cut the nails close to the side of the baseboard, you can just leave them in and not damage ...


5

If the damage is small: plaster, wood filler, Smith's flexible epoxy or bondo can work wonders. Note the bondo stinks really badly. But for the ultimate, get proper molding made. Turns out there are now several factories that automate the reproduction of historic molding. You send them a 6 inch section, they build a knife to match, and cut as much as you ...


5

There is no reason that you can't make jamb extenders these are routinely used in prehung windows. The casings and whatever you use to bridge the gap to the jamb are just trim and have no structural component. The trick is to avoid using the exact same thickness. When two pieces are meeting in a plane, it is best to have a slight reveal, an offset (usually ...


5

There are only 2 options I can think of. Rip the trim down so it is narrow for the place where it won't fit. Build out the opening so the trim will fit. Which is better is entirely a personal preference. Option 1 is easier. I've had to do this with door trim and haven't been unhappy.


5

Jack's answer is completely correct. I will simplify the answer with some easy advice. Use some acrylic painter's caulk in a caulking gun, never use a silicon based product in this situation. When you cut the tip, only cut off enough to leave about an 1/8 inch opening at the tip. You want to push out a very thin bead of caulk that can be "pushed" into the ...


5

Shoe molding may have to be removed in the future to work on the floor or the wall. That's fairly easy with nails. It's fairly difficult with glue, unless you use something like hide glue that's specifically intended to allow disassembly ... and the techniques used for that would be hard to apply in situ to parts of a house. Generally, don't glue anything ...


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