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35

When a professional installs a tile floor there should be no visible difference in the thickness of grout lines. I'm not sure what a hard measurement of percentage would be, but lets just say you should be within 15%. Thicker grout lines will give you more room for error, which is why I would use the "visible difference" standard. Also, the level of the ...


20

Looks like schluter ditra waterproofing membrane. Amazon describes it: This universal underlayment specifically designed for ceramic and stone tile eliminates the main cause of cracking in your tile installation. Tile and stone are rigid materials and are, therefore, sensitive to stresses originating in the sub floor. This uncoupling membrane allows ...


16

The spacing is only the beginning... The trim should be removed before OR they should have tucked the tile under the trim. This is actually funny because doing either one of these things would have saved them 1-2 hours of work. Tucking the tile under the trim makes layout and spacing super easy and allows you to hide cuts. Just from this mistake I ...


12

The corners of the shower walls should never have been grouted in the first place. Corners are the most subject to movement and thus the most likely to crack, so they get caulked, not grouted.


8

According to the sealant data sheet, you can seal new grout after 48 hours. For me I would play it safe if I could (do you have to be able to use this bathroom?), if the grout says no water for 7 days I would wait that long before sealing. That is probably overly cautious but then I don't get much work done during the week anyway so for me waiting until ...


8

In all the shower installs I overseen, the company I worked for maintained that caulk is to be used in any inside corners except where excessive/standing water is. For example, caulk corners where tub and walls meet, and vertical inside corners where the walls come together. DO NOT caulk where the floor and walls meet, I personally seen caulk creep out of ...


8

There may or may not be an easy answer to your question. I would start by calling the grout and tile manufacturers to get their opinion. In general though... You should reasonably expect to get the quality of service you contracted and paid for. Bottom line is do you think you're getting what you paid for. Not what you think you paid for. If you hire the ...


7

If it's at a joint between two planes (e.g. wall and floor or inside corner), then it can be colored or even sanded caulk. Using grout in a corner results in cracking as the structure moves, so caulk is recommended for those joints. Otherwise, you may have an acrylic grout additive to increase flexibility and reduce cracking.


7

Yes new grout can be installed on old grout. Make sure the old grout is thoroughly cleaned and then wet before installation. I do this all the time. There is absolutely no need to start over and given the quality of the install you have had so far I would say that starting over might introduce more issues. On the pan you can expect a slight slope ...


6

It is usually always better to use like materials when fixing something. If you use regular concrete based grout to patch a hole in epoxy grout, not only can you not be sure of a texture and color match, there is the risk that different expansion rates will simply cause the concrete to crack. Not to mention, concrete grout is not stain proof, nor water ...


6

If you're not happy with the job or you have concerns, you should talk to the contractor. Make sure it's very clear what quality level you expect, and that you're concerned that this does not meet that expectation. You may find that there was a reason the tile was installed in this way, and that the experienced tiler knows you'll never notice the flaws in ...


6

I did something similar on a smaller area. I used some plastic tools - scrapers etc and some cement remover product. The cement remover product has an acid base (stings like xxxx if you have an open cut...), but I only applied it to small areas (used a cotton bud) and never to the joints between the tiles you want to keep. If you don’t have patience at ...


5

No that is not true at all. Maybe your contractor was thinking of mortar but a) no contractor should be confusing those and b) even if you used mortar, it'd still be repairable (albeit with a bit more work).


5

I, and many tile pros, aren't fans of the pre-mixed urethane grouts. Again, they're newer products. There's two downsides to the urethane grouts I looked at. The first is that the dry time before water exposure is something like seven days ... again, this is the last time I looked at it, and that might have changed. The urethane grouts are supposedly easy to ...


5

That should have never been grout, joints between walls and other objects should be caulked because movement in those joints will cause the cracking that you now see, and the cracking can lead to water getting behind the tile. This also goes for inside corners in a shower, and the joint between bottom of the wall and the floor or tub..


5

I use epoxy grout all the time. There are good and bad manufacturers for every type of product. So if someone tells you that epoxy grout discolors or has this issue or that... that is really on the manufacturer not the type of grout it is. The epoxy I buy is from HD or Lowes. Each has one main brand. You have to buy the coloring and the additive ...


5

This greatly depends on the type tile you have. If it is a manmade tile such as porcelain, or ceramic, then you don't have to worry about sealing it. Most natural stone tiles, especially softer or water permeable stone such as marble, limestone/travertine, and slate should be sealed as well. This would ideally be done prior to grouting to prevent the stone ...


5

The grout may help to keep the toilet stabile for awhile, but to ensure it remains level and secure you should install shims. I've used plastic building shims that can be snapped-off at 2 inch increments. Any flat material that is water-proof will do. Loosen the bolts at the base of the toilet first. Place a level on the rim of the bowl and shim up the ...


5

Well this is working just like a travertine shower should. Travertine is porous. You can apply sealer but honestly unless the travertine was honed specifically to take sealer - which most residential tile is not - sealer may help a bit but in no way will seal your tile shut. Trust me I have been there. So water is getting into the tile and the grout ...


4

If you want to be sure, yes, you have to dig all the grout out first. Grout bonds mostly to the tiles, less so to itself. If you dig the grout out, try to do it at a 90 degree angle to the "proper height" grout, this will give you the best adhesion for your patch. Also, if possible try to make those 90 degree joins where there's more tile to adhere to (...


4

Your options at this point are scraping it off or dissolving it. My first suggestion would be contacting the tile manufacturer. They would have the best idea of what your tile can handle as far as physical abuse or acid. Scraping Scraping is attractive as a primary option because you can go slowly and start in a small inconspicuous area to see if it will ...


4

echo Michael. I've used Laticrete's SpectraLock.. There's a lot of engineering there to allow water based haze removal (OK, you do need to add white vinegar, very cheap and non-toxic). Spectralock installation Off-the-shelf epoxy is going to require a solvent based haze removal (usually lacquer thinner, acetone, or alcohol).. much more hazardous (...


4

My Uncle was a plumber, so I called him, before re-caulking my newish bathtub for the 3rd time. I told him that no matter how good a job I did, scraping & cleaning out the old caulk, spraying a bleach & water solution into the crack, to kill any mildew that might be present, then wiping it down with a clean, damp cloth, once dry, then laying down the ...


4

No. Grout is basically a form of concrete. If this technology existed then when the government needed to redo roads they would just add this magical potion and road would be redone. A small batch of grout mixed properly only has a usable time of a few hours. Once it even gets even a little stiff it is done.


4

In the bath with the tile base, there is caulk available that is colored to closely resemble a number of colored grouts. Any of the big box stores will carry a good selection of colors. The wood base will need only a good version of white painters caulk, wiped in with a dampened cloth to make the line only in the joint. I forgot to add this detail about the ...


4

Code requires toilets to be caulked at the floor, that, IMO is a mistake. If the toilet does develop a leak, it will be restricted under the toilet and the subfloor, and may leak for a while before it is detected. So much for that. The toilet can be shimmed to keep it from rocking. Because of the rocking, what is not leaking now eventually will leak. The ...


4

Just my thoughts on this: I see mold everywhere, even by the faucet the first thing you need to do is figure out what is behind the tile. If it is drywall you are absolutely wasting your money doing anything. if it is not drywall the first thing I would do is give it a heavy heavy spray of anti-mold cleaner. Maybe 2-3 doses. Scrub away mold using as ...


4

This is indicative of a poor initial layout, perhaps due to inexperience. An experienced tile setter takes note of the areas where defects (like grout lines that can't line up, small or thin cuts, discolored tiles, etc.) would be most visible and makes sure things are perfect in those places, hiding the inevitable problems elsewhere. If the tile had been ...


4

You can remove the existing grout, and re-grout with an epoxy grout. It's more expensive than regular grout but it's completely waterproof and you won't need too seal it. It's also much stronger than regular grout. However, if in fact the shower pan is broken, then this will probably be a temporary fix and you'll know when it fails because the leak will ...


3

Use anti-bacterial water sealed silicone. The reasons being that if you use grout then expansion in the tiles can cause the grout to crack along that tile line. Also caulk will get very grubby quickly. Silicone allows expansion and doesn't get grubby like caulk


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