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36

When a professional installs a tile floor there should be no visible difference in the thickness of grout lines. I'm not sure what a hard measurement of percentage would be, but lets just say you should be within 15%. Thicker grout lines will give you more room for error, which is why I would use the "visible difference" standard. Also, the level of the ...


36

Yes, there is a very good reason. If you add water to dry mix in the bottom of the container, you get a nearly impossible to incorporate glob of the dry mix at the bottom. On the other hand, if you add it from the top, it's much easier to get it all incorporated. This works with everything from pancake mix to drywall compound. Try it each way and you'll see ...


20

Looks like schluter ditra waterproofing membrane. Amazon describes it: This universal underlayment specifically designed for ceramic and stone tile eliminates the main cause of cracking in your tile installation. Tile and stone are rigid materials and are, therefore, sensitive to stresses originating in the sub floor. This uncoupling membrane allows ...


17

As suggested by @Ecnerwal, I wrote to Custom Building Products' customer support. Got a reply within 15 minutes: The isolated areas look to be a bit of sealer residue that might not have been wiped or rubbed dry with dry paper towels after each application within 3 minutes of each application? If so, this can be safely scrubbed off at any time, using a ...


16

The spacing is only the beginning... The trim should be removed before OR they should have tucked the tile under the trim. This is actually funny because doing either one of these things would have saved them 1-2 hours of work. Tucking the tile under the trim makes layout and spacing super easy and allows you to hide cuts. Just from this mistake I ...


14

From Chemistry: "Do like you oughtta: add acid to water" . Besides the "glop" problem mentioned in the answer, there is almost always released heat when dissolving something in water. If you start with lots of reagent and little water, the water may boil, leading to rather undesirable dispersal of hot reagent.


10

In all the shower installs I overseen, the company I worked for maintained that caulk is to be used in any inside corners except where excessive/standing water is. For example, caulk corners where tub and walls meet, and vertical inside corners where the walls come together. DO NOT caulk where the floor and walls meet, I personally seen caulk creep out of ...


9

There may or may not be an easy answer to your question. I would start by calling the grout and tile manufacturers to get their opinion. In general though... You should reasonably expect to get the quality of service you contracted and paid for. Bottom line is do you think you're getting what you paid for. Not what you think you paid for. If you hire the ...


7

If you're not happy with the job or you have concerns, you should talk to the contractor. Make sure it's very clear what quality level you expect, and that you're concerned that this does not meet that expectation. You may find that there was a reason the tile was installed in this way, and that the experienced tiler knows you'll never notice the flaws in ...


7

If it's at a joint between two planes (e.g. wall and floor or inside corner), then it can be colored or even sanded caulk. Using grout in a corner results in cracking as the structure moves, so caulk is recommended for those joints. Otherwise, you may have an acrylic grout additive to increase flexibility and reduce cracking.


7

Yes new grout can be installed on old grout. Make sure the old grout is thoroughly cleaned and then wet before installation. I do this all the time. There is absolutely no need to start over and given the quality of the install you have had so far I would say that starting over might introduce more issues. On the pan you can expect a slight slope ...


7

Did you use all the grout at once? Some grouts aren't dry mixed well at at the factory. If you read the fine print it will say to mix the dry grout BEFORE adding water to. So if you do it in batches and didn't mix it, you'll get uneven results. When you wash it, it's just getting wet and hiding the problem.


6

My Uncle was a plumber, so I called him, before re-caulking my newish bathtub for the 3rd time. I told him that no matter how good a job I did, scraping & cleaning out the old caulk, spraying a bleach & water solution into the crack, to kill any mildew that might be present, then wiping it down with a clean, damp cloth, once dry, then laying down the ...


6

Code requires toilets to be caulked at the floor, that, IMO is a mistake. If the toilet does develop a leak, it will be restricted under the toilet and the subfloor, and may leak for a while before it is detected. So much for that. The toilet can be shimmed to keep it from rocking. Because of the rocking, what is not leaking now eventually will leak. The ...


6

The grout may help to keep the toilet stabile for awhile, but to ensure it remains level and secure you should install shims. I've used plastic building shims that can be snapped-off at 2 inch increments. Any flat material that is water-proof will do. Loosen the bolts at the base of the toilet first. Place a level on the rim of the bowl and shim up the ...


6

I did something similar on a smaller area. I used some plastic tools - scrapers etc and some cement remover product. The cement remover product has an acid base (stings like xxxx if you have an open cut...), but I only applied it to small areas (used a cotton bud) and never to the joints between the tiles you want to keep. If you don’t have patience at ...


6

It is probably failing because grout was in the gap prior to you caulking over it and it was not clean enough. The gap should not have been grouted at all. You should remove all of the caulk and grout, use a retractable utility knife and a five in one tool to clean it out. Use the flexibility of the knife to get as much of the old caulk out of the gap and ...


5

That should have never been grout, joints between walls and other objects should be caulked because movement in those joints will cause the cracking that you now see, and the cracking can lead to water getting behind the tile. This also goes for inside corners in a shower, and the joint between bottom of the wall and the floor or tub..


5

I use epoxy grout all the time. There are good and bad manufacturers for every type of product. So if someone tells you that epoxy grout discolors or has this issue or that... that is really on the manufacturer not the type of grout it is. The epoxy I buy is from HD or Lowes. Each has one main brand. You have to buy the coloring and the additive ...


5

This greatly depends on the type tile you have. If it is a manmade tile such as porcelain, or ceramic, then you don't have to worry about sealing it. Most natural stone tiles, especially softer or water permeable stone such as marble, limestone/travertine, and slate should be sealed as well. This would ideally be done prior to grouting to prevent the stone ...


5

Well this is working just like a travertine shower should. Travertine is porous. You can apply sealer but honestly unless the travertine was honed specifically to take sealer - which most residential tile is not - sealer may help a bit but in no way will seal your tile shut. Trust me I have been there. So water is getting into the tile and the grout ...


4

No. Grout is basically a form of concrete. If this technology existed then when the government needed to redo roads they would just add this magical potion and road would be redone. A small batch of grout mixed properly only has a usable time of a few hours. Once it even gets even a little stiff it is done.


4

In the bath with the tile base, there is caulk available that is colored to closely resemble a number of colored grouts. Any of the big box stores will carry a good selection of colors. The wood base will need only a good version of white painters caulk, wiped in with a dampened cloth to make the line only in the joint. I forgot to add this detail about the ...


4

Just my thoughts on this: I see mold everywhere, even by the faucet the first thing you need to do is figure out what is behind the tile. If it is drywall you are absolutely wasting your money doing anything. if it is not drywall the first thing I would do is give it a heavy heavy spray of anti-mold cleaner. Maybe 2-3 doses. Scrub away mold using as ...


4

This is indicative of a poor initial layout, perhaps due to inexperience. An experienced tile setter takes note of the areas where defects (like grout lines that can't line up, small or thin cuts, discolored tiles, etc.) would be most visible and makes sure things are perfect in those places, hiding the inevitable problems elsewhere. If the tile had been ...


4

You can remove the existing grout, and re-grout with an epoxy grout. It's more expensive than regular grout but it's completely waterproof and you won't need too seal it. It's also much stronger than regular grout. However, if in fact the shower pan is broken, then this will probably be a temporary fix and you'll know when it fails because the leak will ...


4

Grout is not meant to be a water barrier! Grout is porous. If the cracks are surface grout cracks only, then repairing the grout for cosmetic reasons makes sense. If the underlying water barrier (there are various types) is compromised then repairing just the grout will not stop water intrusion.


3

In all my jobs, whether large or small tile, using a grout float has always been the way it has been done. Bagging it would practically do the same thing. The tip of a grout bag is much, much wider than the joints, and you would need to force the grout in anyway, still smearing it over the face of the tile.


3

This is really impossible to answer without opening it up more. But basically it depends on the damage already done. What you really need to do is clean this shower (bleach) and take out any loose pieces. And let it sit for a week. Also try to keep the humidity in the room low too. If nothing grows back and your tiles are structurally bonding you can ...


3

I seriously doubt that you will remove the dye from the grout using any method. Your best bet is to pick up a grout saw at lowes or home depot for about seven dollars that has a diamond blade on the end. You will be able to use the pointed end to file down the small amount where the gray overlapped( if that's what happened). IF it was too wet and these ...


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