45

You hire a chimney sweep to inspect (and clean) it. In some cases it may need to be completely rebuilt - in others, it may simply need cleaned and inspected, or it may need something in the middle. At that age, you may well find that you'll face relining to make use of it under modern conceptions of what's safe - it will have deteriorated with age and ...


22

Another thing to consider with a chimney that old is the distinct possibility that the bricks were laid up with a mixture of sand, horse hair and a bit of lime mixed in. It is not uncommon for a chimney like that to have the external weather at the roof line and above erode away some of or all of the sand leaving the bricks literally free stacked with spaces ...


14

What's a "hi hat"? Is that like a can light (i.e. a light installed in a can flush behind ceiling drywall)? Anyway: stuff, whether smoke or otherwise, shouldn't be blowing from any lights. One hopes that it's not actually smoke, and I would work harder to confirm that it's not. Check the entire fireplace flue and any spaces it traverses in the house and ...


13

Having built and been specing equipment for all kinds of fireplaces, I would have to say that this key is used to turn a quarter-turn gas valve. If you like to reference it, you can find the same key, with the valve set up, manufactered by Arrowhead Brass.


13

I would build a 2x4 (or 2x6, it's hard to tell the depth from this picture) frame to fit into the cubby hole, something like this: Spacing and attaching Space the studs 16" on center. You'll need to attach this securely to the rest of the walls. Assuming they're also wood, a few 3" #10 screws into either side would probably do the trick. Be sure to recess ...


12

While this will not directly answer your question, I'd like to offer an alternative solution. Modify Existing Molding If it were me. I'd get some transition molding, with a profile like this. I'd then set up my table saw to rip the piece, to remove the angle profile on the back edge. Which would give me a profile like this. Once I had my molding ripped to ...


11

A shelf or mantle is what I've read is usually done for the purpose of protecting the TV. Comment: TV above a fireplace is absolutely the worst place to put one. Not just for heat reasons but, ergonomically, it should be placed at eye level for most comfortable viewing.


10

It is a bad idea. TV screens are designed to be viewed basically level from your eyes as you sit in your TV room. If you mount it above the mantel you will forever looking up to see the thing. The heat thing is also a concern for electronics as you have mentioned. Raise the temperature some and in the best case you will age certain components and shorten ...


9

The thermopile in your fireplace puts out millivolts, nothing near the 120V the light switch was designed for. It's probably just a matter of finding a switch with a low enough on resistance. A generic low voltage switch from a electronics store, or ripped out of a toy, would probably do it (for example a 12V SPST). Really here the smaller the better, but ...


8

When I light my fireplace I leave my flue open for the night. The residual smoke from your fire is putting the smoke smell in the house when you close the flue


8

If someone offers to modernise your chimney by putting some sort of metal tube or liner inside, make sure the chimney is cleaned first and all soot is removed. If this is not done properly, you risk having a fire in the space between the tube and the chimney, which you (or the fire brigade) won't be able to reach to put out.


8

Yes - examples are out there. For practical reasons the chimney tends to be metal, or in older buildings, just a smokehole in the roof.


7

Your friend is absolutely wrong. Color doesn't make any difference, and the outside is not chrome, it is stainless steel insulated pipe. Insulated pipe is not required from the stove to the ceiling where it adapts to insulated pipe


7

Creosote from wood fires is the main reason, so no, cleaning from that standpoint isn't needed.


7

Damper closed - most likely. Chimney blocked - while "damper closed" is a self-correctable version of this, if the fireplace has not been inspected there may be anything from bird nests to parts of a chimney in serious disrepair blocking the flue. SO - before you become a statistic (of the chimney fire sort) call a chimney sweep and have the flue inspected ...


7

That is a wood burning fireplace with a gas starter. The intent is to use the gas starter to get your log fire burning. You can then shut down the gas starter jet. Since it's a foreclosure the flue may not have been maintained properly. It would be a good idea to have a professional come in to inspect the chimney liner to ensure it is in good condition and ...


6

There is no way to convert a gas fireplace to burn wood, unless you are very lucky and the gas fireplace is an insert in a properly functioning solid fuel fireplace (in which case you basically just remove the insert, and have the fireplace inspected). In situations like this, you have a couple options. Install a Solid Fuel Stove This option will require the ...


6

If the pressure you're measuring is the static pressure, that is the pressure in the line with no gas flowing, that pressure is the same everywhere in the line. You cannot increase that pressure by removing unneeded gas pipe. Instead, you can try having the gas company adjust or replace your regulator. If you're measuring the pressure while gas is flowing, ...


6

I love these garden fireplaces, but think you would be wise to keep it outdoors as it was designed for. In my humble opinion, the fact that it is an open flaming device with flames viewable 360 degrees, it would be very dangerous to have it indoors. Sparks and embers could easily escape the enclosure with a draft from a door or window. As far a a flue is ...


6

You should try to determine the manufacturer and model of your fireplace and get a copy of the installation instructions, which will have detailed instructions on the required clearances. The answer will vary depending on the construction of the fireplace.


5

Wood fires burn much hotter than gas and put up sparks, soot, and other sediment as well. You will probably have to install a new chimney and use a smaller box to have greater clearance/insulation to the surrounding wall.


5

I am not sure what kind of fireplace you have. But there is definately a legal clearance limit around the opening for combustable materials. Check with your local building codes or manufacturer if you have one of those "insert" types of fireplaces. A wood mantle will act a heat shield. Even though wood burns it still acts as an insulator so it should be ...


5

It makes me die a little inside when people paint over raw red brick.... That said, you tape and paper the walls where they meet the brick. Then you plastic from the paper as far out as you think you might overspray. You may even want to form a "curtain" out of the plastic to keep the brick in a make-shift paint booth. It is just as you would mask any ...


5

It is called Casing and is mainly used around doors and windows.


5

The characteristics and composition of firebrick also called refractory brick make it suitable for high heat applications. Conventional pavers will fail quickly when exposed to heat. I can't testify about pavers but I have had concrete explosively spall (small pieces of concrete shrapnel) while cutting steel anchors with a torch. So you really need bricks ...


5

Yes. These are painted all the time. I just used this for a traditional wood burning fireplace. You can search for fireplace paint but really you are looking for it to withstand the max temperature. Since yours is gas I am guessing your max is well less than 1000 F. Also most fireboxes are painted black so you can see the fire easier. And because of ...


5

I would really suggest that you should hire a local expert to come out to your place to give you advice on the chimney condition, design and safety. I am quite sure that there was good reason to cap off and close up the chimney and fireplace in the past and it is highly unlikely that you will come to an understanding of the reasons without some seasoned ...


5

Your dad is wrong. Chimneys have been used for non-fireplace heating systems since the days of the Franklin Stove. Also, remember that the interior of the house may have been drastically rearranged over the years. My kitchen definitely isn't where it was when the place was built, and in fact the old kitchen space is now my dining room. The only way to be ...


5

I had the same problem when converting mine. The pipes have been subjected to repeated extreme heat and cooling cycles and will be difficult to unthread. Your best bet is to soak with penetrating oil (slide some cardboard under prior to spraying so you don't soak the bricks). Soak repeatedly and tap the pipes frequently to help the oil penetrate into the ...


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