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45

You hire a chimney sweep to inspect (and clean) it. In some cases it may need to be completely rebuilt - in others, it may simply need cleaned and inspected, or it may need something in the middle. At that age, you may well find that you'll face relining to make use of it under modern conceptions of what's safe - it will have deteriorated with age and ...


22

Another thing to consider with a chimney that old is the distinct possibility that the bricks were laid up with a mixture of sand, horse hair and a bit of lime mixed in. It is not uncommon for a chimney like that to have the external weather at the roof line and above erode away some of or all of the sand leaving the bricks literally free stacked with spaces ...


13

I would build a 2x4 (or 2x6, it's hard to tell the depth from this picture) frame to fit into the cubby hole, something like this: Spacing and attaching Space the studs 16" on center. You'll need to attach this securely to the rest of the walls. Assuming they're also wood, a few 3" #10 screws into either side would probably do the trick. Be sure to recess ...


12

While this will not directly answer your question, I'd like to offer an alternative solution. Modify Existing Molding If it were me. I'd get some transition molding, with a profile like this. I'd then set up my table saw to rip the piece, to remove the angle profile on the back edge. Which would give me a profile like this. Once I had my molding ripped ...


11

I agree with @DA01 that it'll basically be impossible to fish horizontally through studs and insulation, without having to cut open all of the sheetrock. Then you have to deal with sealing it all back up air-tight, and patching the drywall and repainting (at least the entire wall, and maybe the entire room, depending the paint match). So a couple ...


11

A shelf or mantle is what I've read is usually done for the purpose of protecting the TV. Comment: TV above a fireplace is absolutely the worst place to put one. Not just for heat reasons but, ergonomically, it should be placed at eye level for most comfortable viewing.


10

Having built and been specing equipment for all kinds of fireplaces, I would have to say that this key is used to turn a quarter-turn gas valve. If you like to reference it, you can find the same key, with the valve set up, manufactered by Arrowhead Brass.


8

The thermopile in your fireplace puts out millivolts, nothing near the 120V the light switch was designed for. It's probably just a matter of finding a switch with a low enough on resistance. A generic low voltage switch from a electronics store, or ripped out of a toy, would probably do it (for example a 12V SPST). Really here the smaller the better, but ...


8

If someone offers to modernise your chimney by putting some sort of metal tube or liner inside, make sure the chimney is cleaned first and all soot is removed. If this is not done properly, you risk having a fire in the space between the tube and the chimney, which you (or the fire brigade) won't be able to reach to put out.


7

I did this exact thing a few years ago in a friend's house. The steps I took: Remove lime efflorescence from the brick by spraying on some diluted white vinegar, then scrubbing with a stiff-bristled nylon brush. Leave to dry. Prime and seal (there were some smoke stains on the brick) the fireplace with Kilz latex spray primer. Leave to dry. Paint with ...


7

Your friend is absolutely wrong. Color doesn't make any difference, and the outside is not chrome, it is stainless steel insulated pipe. Insulated pipe is not required from the stove to the ceiling where it adapts to insulated pipe


7

When I light my fireplace I leave my flue open for the night. The residual smoke from your fire is putting the smoke smell in the house when you close the flue


7

Creosote from wood fires is the main reason, so no, cleaning from that standpoint isn't needed.


7

Damper closed - most likely. Chimney blocked - while "damper closed" is a self-correctable version of this, if the fireplace has not been inspected there may be anything from bird nests to parts of a chimney in serious disrepair blocking the flue. SO - before you become a statistic (of the chimney fire sort) call a chimney sweep and have the flue inspected ...


6

Quikrete FASTSET Repair Mortar is a great product. The biggest difference between it and a typical type S mortar is that it is "fastset" (duh) meaning it will be hard in about 20 min. Not cured, but hardened. And that it is intended for commercial use as it will eventually reach 6000 psi after it's full 28 day cure. This product does not need any bonding ...


6

Your flue should always be open when the fireplace is operating. It is a fire and smoke risk to close the flue while the fire is lit. When not burning, the flue should be closed to prevent heat loss.


6

If it's sheetrock, I'd bite the bullet and cut out a section. Then you can easily remove insulation, drill studs, insert smurf tube and fish everything through easily. With the smurf tube, it should be easy to re-fish future cables as needed. (though with any luck we'll finally have wireless HDMI sooner or later...) Yes it means you need to patch, tape, mud ...


6

Our house was built in the 1970s and we had a similar dilemma. We covered the brick added a new mantle added black granite tiles as well as covering the opening with a cover we bought at a home improvement store. We also widened the area a little as well to offset the mantel. With the doors shut it looks very modern and clean and hides the internals. ...


6

There is no way to convert a gas fireplace to burn wood, unless you are very lucky and the gas fireplace is an insert in a properly functioning solid fuel fireplace (in which case you basically just remove the insert, and have the fireplace inspected). In situations like this, you have a couple options. Install a Solid Fuel Stove This option will ...


6

If the pressure you're measuring is the static pressure, that is the pressure in the line with no gas flowing, that pressure is the same everywhere in the line. You cannot increase that pressure by removing unneeded gas pipe. Instead, you can try having the gas company adjust or replace your regulator. If you're measuring the pressure while gas is flowing, ...


6

I love these garden fireplaces, but think you would be wise to keep it outdoors as it was designed for. In my humble opinion, the fact that it is an open flaming device with flames viewable 360 degrees, it would be very dangerous to have it indoors. Sparks and embers could easily escape the enclosure with a draft from a door or window. As far a a flue is ...


6

You should try to determine the manufacturer and model of your fireplace and get a copy of the installation instructions, which will have detailed instructions on the required clearances. The answer will vary depending on the construction of the fireplace.


5

There is no hard and fast rule. A few fires a season may be OK, a daily fire that is not very hot may not be. Creosote builds up from vapors condensing on the interior surface of the chimney, so the amount of buildup will depend on how hot the fire is, chimney construction, and possibly even what time of year the wood was cut (there is more sap in the ...


5

You can tell very quickly if the outlet is at all special by shutting off power to the outlet, removing it, and inspecting it. It seems rather unlikely to me that the outlet would be special since it's not near water, and it's supplying power for a blower. Other than making sure you've got proper amperage rating, I wouldn't think there would be any ...


5

I've checked the National Electrical Code and there are no specific references to receptacles installed near any type of fireplace. Your biggest concern is likely the heat produced by the fire, but that's a concern for the ampacity of the wires, and has nothing to do with the receptacle. Also, like all receptacles newly installed today, the receptacle would ...


5

Wood fires burn much hotter than gas and put up sparks, soot, and other sediment as well. You will probably have to install a new chimney and use a smaller box to have greater clearance/insulation to the surrounding wall.


5

It makes me die a little inside when people paint over raw red brick.... That said, you tape and paper the walls where they meet the brick. Then you plastic from the paper as far out as you think you might overspray. You may even want to form a "curtain" out of the plastic to keep the brick in a make-shift paint booth. It is just as you would mask any ...


5

I am not sure what kind of fireplace you have. But there is definately a legal clearance limit around the opening for combustable materials. Check with your local building codes or manufacturer if you have one of those "insert" types of fireplaces. A wood mantle will act a heat shield. Even though wood burns it still acts as an insulator so it should be ...


5

It is called Casing and is mainly used around doors and windows.


5

The characteristics and composition of firebrick also called refractory brick make it suitable for high heat applications. Conventional pavers will fail quickly when exposed to heat. I can't testify about pavers but I have had concrete explosively spall (small pieces of concrete shrapnel) while cutting steel anchors with a torch. So you really need bricks ...


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