Hot answers tagged

44

I would consider adding a positive pressure to your living space with the fresh air being pulled from a wall on the opposite side of the house. I have installed this type of fan in several multi-family dwellings to keep smoke stink out. The ones I have used are quite small squirrel-cage blowers that operate with a pressure switch; I think it was based on 2 ...


31

I just had a friend that went through this about 8 months ago. This is not really a DIY question if you want a long-term answer. I will get back to how his situation turned out... Your answer is to stop your neighbor from smoking. Let's just take weed off the table. Let's talk cigarettes or vaping which is not considered a controlled substance. It ...


22

I use foam rubber weather stripping gaskets: Alternatively, rubber hose works equally as well. Just buy it in a profile slightly wider than the gap, then tuck it in the gap. Friction will hold it in place. And easy to replace if you ever need to pull the stove out.


12

Those gaps are rarely sealed because the stove needs to be moveable for cleaning and service. Food will get behind and under the stove, and you'll want to be able to pull it out and clean. If you must do it, clear silicone (not a silicone blend) is typically the right product. It'll bond well to the countertop and the stainless (if properly cleaned), and ...


12

I have had some similar projects. On occasion, I have been able to force glue into a joint with a glue syringe and clamp the joints together. The key to this method is cleaning out the joint with a putty knife or something similar and clamping it tightly. The method that has been most tried and true for me is, unfortunately, a bit more involved. Those ...


10

You first need to fill in the cracks. Home Depot has a variety of products available. Some are latex based that are easy to apply but probably best used for smaller cracks up to 1/2" wide. Others are cold patches that you have to compress with a tamper or by driving over them a few times. Some need to be heated with a propane torch. Those I believe are the ...


9

Is the joint still solid? That is, if you grab the two pieces on either side and shake them, is there any movement? If it's solid, then it means that the gap is just a result of shrinkage, and it's merely a cosmetic problem. Just slap some wood filler in there and sand it down. But if it's actually separating, then you'll have to re-glue it (see ...


7

There are metal and there are silicone rubber pieces with a T cross section designed for just for this purpose. https://www.amazon.com/Stovetop-Extender-SE24BLA-Oven-Guard/dp/B0027DW4QG. The tops of "slide-in" ranges cover the gap, but there is a gap when a "free-standing" range is used. These cover pieces work well for covering the gap. They keep anything ...


7

What you want is called a bulkhead fitting. This has a gasket to make a seal against the container, and threads to connect to whatever fittings you need. Some have outside threads on only one side, or you can get them with inside and outside threads on both sides, and they cone in all sorts of different sizes and materials. You can screw in a 6mm push-...


7

There are 3 options: 1) Solid Color Concrete Stain: Just like solid body stain for wood, this is provides a uniform color and should cover the two different color stains you have. However, many feel it looks too uniform. In fact, most complain that it looks "plastic". Stamped concrete should look like natural stone rather than painted stone. (A good solid ...


7

The colors mean something, but the meaning has changed over the years so some info may be old. The CURRENT standard is: White = single density tape and is ONLY good for small fittings up to 3/8 in. pipe. Most people are unaware of this. "Double Density" tape used to come in white as well, but because that could be used for larger pipes, it was impossible ...


6

Hydraulic cement would be a reasonable choice for patching small holes in concrete - since that's what it's made for. Be sure to wet the hole first, then pack in the cement and level it off.


5

I think your third idea will work and look the best. First fill the void with expanding foam, allow the foam to cure, then cut it off flush with the face of the existing door trim. Then cover the area with whatever molding/trim you find most aesthetically pleasing. You may wish to miter or cope the corners to get a more finished appearance.


5

This greatly depends on the type tile you have. If it is a manmade tile such as porcelain, or ceramic, then you don't have to worry about sealing it. Most natural stone tiles, especially softer or water permeable stone such as marble, limestone/travertine, and slate should be sealed as well. This would ideally be done prior to grouting to prevent the stone ...


5

As isherwood noted, you don't want to do this in any permanent way. However, there are lots of companies that sell plastic/rubber strips that are meant to fit in this gap. Just Google strip to block gap between stove and counter and you'll find lots of fairly inexpensive options.


5

Install weatherstripping on bottom of garage door. From the pics, I can't tell if the garage door rolls up or swings to open. If the door rolls up, the weatherstripping can be installed on the very bottom of the door. Weatherstripping comes in various shapes and thicknesses. Filling a 1 1/2" to 2" gap seems excessive, but possible. If the door swings, ...


5

I think some modern NPT threads are not as well made as in the past. I have had more leaks than decades ago. Used to be white Teflon tape would work every time, but the last four (recent) 1/2" and 3/4" NPT connections I have made leaked. In both cases I had to take them apart and use pipe dope. One (washing machine supply valves hot and cold) seeped for ...


4

You are far more likely to die from worrying about asbestos than from asbestos. I just finished dealing with the same thing you are. Where possible, I installed engineered flooring and underlayment over the linoleum. They look killer! :) My mother, a retired cyto-technologist, kind of laughed at me about my own asbestos concerns. http://fumento.com/...


4

If the plastic sheet you put over the curing caulk formed a vapor seal, the caulk did not cure properly which could make it not adhere and peel. Curing caulk should be left open to the air to off gas at its natural rate determined primarily by temperature. As long as the sink is at room temperature this should happen in less than 24 hours. Do not disturb ...


4

If you look at polished granite with a magnifying glass, you'll see the tiny fissure and pock marks that allow moisture from water and other liquids to penetrate into it. Just because it's polished doesn't make it waterproof. One of my customers recently had picked out 3 prefabricated granite slabs but had to leave them in the granite yard for two weeks ...


4

If your question is about the air ducts, why not use the correct material for the job, rather than silicone caulk. Duct sealant is, literally, made for the job. It also costs less, on a quick look.


4

No. You're limited by what you can do from the outside, and obviously that's not much. Energy efficiency is only slightly reduced in such cases, as airflow into and out of the compartment between panes is minimal, but the aesthetic problem will only get worse. Chances are you can replace just the sash, which might cost about half of what a new window ...


4

I would use drywall compound and fill in between the wall and the duct. And then I would tape using a UL181 tape (I like foil mastic) over the inside edge of the duct and the wall. Apply the tape flat and rub it smooth. The tape will be covered by the register. Using UL181 tape to seal the duct to the ceiling membrane really should be standard.


4

Leave it exposed to the elements. You're not doing it any favors by sealing it with plastic. In fact, you'll run the risk of staining it by trapping moisture and/or fostering mildew and other grossness. It's better to let it dry out gradually over the winter and have it seasoned and ready for sealing in the spring. It may fade or gray out slightly, but the ...


4

Yes. The extent to which that is "sealed" is debatable, but there's certainly no issue with finishing over cured stain - it's done all the time. Just stay food safe (and be sure to check with your guests about nut allergies if using something like walnut oil, which is a good food-safe hardening oil, but not great if you have a guest with tree-nut ...


4

There are a several things you need to do. Remove the fan from the heating duct. This will entail properly wire-nutting the wires and terminating them in a junction box that is covered but left accesible per code. If the fan is on it's own circuit (unlikely) you would want to shut down that breaker. Importantly, you want to mark the new junction box and any ...


3

Many drop in sinks require the caulk to be applied under the sink before it's dropped in, where it will not be visible. The bead of caulk will be just under the edge of the rim, and any excess is wiped away after the sink is clamped down. Check the installation instructions for your sink to see if this was the requirement for yours, and if so, you may need ...


3

Two notes: Indoors or outdoors, you want to use only boiled linseed oil (not raw). Neither Home Depot nor Lowes sells genuine, boiled linseed oil. They sell only "boiled" linseed oil. What's the difference? Well, the purpose of boiling is to oxidize the oil. It is vastly easier and cheaper to add metallic or other oxidants to the oil to ...


3

I have always used boiled linseed oil on the handle of my garden equipment. Wooden shovels, rakes, pickaxes, and such. That's what I thought it was for. It lasts a long time and doesn't get slick or gummy. I just get a rag wet with it and wipe it on. It should look great on some outside furniture.


3

About 35 years ago, I build an Adirondack Chair using pressure treated wood. To preserve the wood I used an old farmers recipe using Linseed oil, which follows... Apply oil, after time to soak in, wipe excess off... | Once a day for a week | Once a week for a month | Once a month for a year... | After that, as needed My chair as I said, is about ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible