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22

I use foam rubber weather stripping gaskets: Alternatively, rubber hose works equally as well. Just buy it in a profile slightly wider than the gap, then tuck it in the gap. Friction will hold it in place. And easy to replace if you ever need to pull the stove out.


12

Standing water in the bottom of the dish washer after a cleaning cycle is complete is NOT normal. After the wash/rinse cycle and the pump out your dishwasher not have water in it. Standing water could be due to number of problems. I'll list out some of the things to check on. 1) There is a possibility that the filter screen in the bottom of your washer is ...


12

Those gaps are rarely sealed because the stove needs to be moveable for cleaning and service. Food will get behind and under the stove, and you'll want to be able to pull it out and clean. If you must do it, clear silicone (not a silicone blend) is typically the right product. It'll bond well to the countertop and the stainless (if properly cleaned), and ...


12

I have had some similar projects. On occasion, I have been able to force glue into a joint with a glue syringe and clamp the joints together. The key to this method is cleaning out the joint with a putty knife or something similar and clamping it tightly. The method that has been most tried and true for me is, unfortunately, a bit more involved. Those ...


10

You first need to fill in the cracks. Home Depot has a variety of products available. Some are latex based that are easy to apply but probably best used for smaller cracks up to 1/2" wide. Others are cold patches that you have to compress with a tamper or by driving over them a few times. Some need to be heated with a propane torch. Those I believe are the ...


9

I would caulk any joint between fiberglass and tile. Some pre-made fiberglass kits have ways to overlap and seal the joint, but that doesn't appear to be your situation. Water coming out of the shower will be much more significant than any moisture that makes it through the tiles and grout. That said, if moisture eventually deteriorates the walls and tiles, ...


9

Is the joint still solid? That is, if you grab the two pieces on either side and shake them, is there any movement? If it's solid, then it means that the gap is just a result of shrinkage, and it's merely a cosmetic problem. Just slap some wood filler in there and sand it down. But if it's actually separating, then you'll have to re-glue it (see ...


8

According to the sealant data sheet, you can seal new grout after 48 hours. For me I would play it safe if I could (do you have to be able to use this bathroom?), if the grout says no water for 7 days I would wait that long before sealing. That is probably overly cautious but then I don't get much work done during the week anyway so for me waiting until ...


8

The door gasket on your dishwasher may not be sealing - check that for sure. I would: Stop using the dishwasher for a week to let the area dry out. Mask off the formica/laminate in front. Use a solvent-based polyurethane (exterior grade) on the particle board that is crumbling. This will soak in and hopefully glue it all back together. Think about gluing ...


8

Check your manual! It should say. My dishwasher specifically states that there should always be a small amount of water remaining in the dishwasher, and if there isn't (say during first run after installation) you should add several cups of water. Source:GE Dishwasher manual (PDF)


7

I'd first check for leaks. Even a tiny crack can let a lot of cold air in over time. Caulking would be the proper solution, but since you're renting, foam weatherstripping tape may be a quicker/cheaper solution. Next, if the window is single-paned or otherwise just poor quality, the cold could be coming straight through the glass. (This is probably more ...


7

There are metal and there are silicone rubber pieces with a T cross section designed for just for this purpose. https://www.amazon.com/Stovetop-Extender-SE24BLA-Oven-Guard/dp/B0027DW4QG. The tops of "slide-in" ranges cover the gap, but there is a gap when a "free-standing" range is used. These cover pieces work well for covering the gap. They keep anything ...


7

What you want is called a bulkhead fitting. This has a gasket to make a seal against the container, and threads to connect to whatever fittings you need. Some have outside threads on only one side, or you can get them with inside and outside threads on both sides, and they cone in all sorts of different sizes and materials. You can screw in a 6mm push-...


7

There are 3 options: 1) Solid Color Concrete Stain: Just like solid body stain for wood, this is provides a uniform color and should cover the two different color stains you have. However, many feel it looks too uniform. In fact, most complain that it looks "plastic". Stamped concrete should look like natural stone rather than painted stone. (A good solid ...


6

I would personally use Loctite PL Polyurethane Concrete Crack & Masonry Sealant, which will adhere well but still provide a degree of flexibility as your pipe moves within the brick. It's grey, but you can also mix in a little concrete dust or dirt to give it that "I'm not shiny caulk, honest!" look. The PL product should be available at your local ...


6

In these situations, I use bulkhead fittings. It saves the annoyance to getting this stuff to seal properly, any slight leverage and there's now a leak. These are available in several sizes at most plumbing supply stores. If there's a gentle curve to the surface this has to penetrate, I've used a large O-ring instead of the supplied gasket. They're available ...


6

The first step is to clean the deck. A very simple and inexpensive method is to wet the deck, spray or scrub on a mixture of 1 cup TSP, 1/2 gal household bleach, and 2 gal water. Scrub it with a course, stiff broom. Then either rinse with a hose or power wash off before it dries completely on the surface. this works as good it not better than expensive deck ...


6

Plexiglas (poly (methyl methacrylate)) is strongly attacked by xylene, one of the solvents in the sealant you selected. I'd expect the sealant to soften the plexiglas and probably also whatever plastic the air conditioner is made of.


5

It's always good to inspect your deck every year after winter. Check for any loosening fasteners, any signs of rot, check for mold, and inspect places where wood meets wood. I would advise against an annual power-washing. It is extremely harsh on the wood, even if done by a professional. It requires a lot of work to restore the surface, as the pressure ...


5

The best solution I've found is to fabricate a container out of PVC pipe and two end caps, found at any hardware store. I cut the PVC pipe to about 12", permanently glue one end cap onto the pipe and use the other end cap to seal the pipe without glue. I place a small rubber cap from my junk drawer onto the open/cut tip, spray a small amount of Bloxygen into ...


5

The sealant strip is supposed to cope with some movement of the shower (or bath) by being flexible. However, what usually happens is that it's not quite flexible enough or loses it's flexibility with age so water starts seeping around it. This is when caulk or other sealants are added on top. If you can get a good seal with the caulk (which you appear to ...


5

Let's start by saying the tile should be replaced. It still can be replaced even though the grout has been applied. I would insist on it. There is little that can be done to repair the flawed tile, except sanding or grinding down the flaw. This would have to be done with extreme caution in order not to scratch and damage the area around the flaw. Perhaps ...


5

I use shrink wrap. Simple and effective. Thermal loss is quite significantly by convection, not conduction. We used it to take on power bills as poor college students, but I also saw this method employed by million-dollar homes.


5

I think your third idea will work and look the best. First fill the void with expanding foam, allow the foam to cure, then cut it off flush with the face of the existing door trim. Then cover the area with whatever molding/trim you find most aesthetically pleasing. You may wish to miter or cope the corners to get a more finished appearance.


5

Hydraulic cement would be a reasonable choice for patching small holes in concrete - since that's what it's made for. Be sure to wet the hole first, then pack in the cement and level it off.


5

This greatly depends on the type tile you have. If it is a manmade tile such as porcelain, or ceramic, then you don't have to worry about sealing it. Most natural stone tiles, especially softer or water permeable stone such as marble, limestone/travertine, and slate should be sealed as well. This would ideally be done prior to grouting to prevent the stone ...


5

As isherwood noted, you don't want to do this in any permanent way. However, there are lots of companies that sell plastic/rubber strips that are meant to fit in this gap. Just Google strip to block gap between stove and counter and you'll find lots of fairly inexpensive options.


4

Gorilla glue makes a non-toxic PVC cement.


4

I have to say, this is a very uncommon situation. I have never seen a radiator behind a sink or heard of a movable sink table. I guess you have your reasons, but would it be easier to put doors on the front of the "sink table" so you can access the plumbing etc without moving it? With that said, the first thing I'd recommend would be replacing the wood ...


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