32

4000 PSI is too much or a shitload of pressure. I would never use it on high on anything that I was cleaning at a home. Even brick work could get damaged of up close 4000 PSI. Probably the only thing I would use it for is cleaning my driveway but even then I would probably use a fan nozzle. 4000 PSI would just rip the paint off a home - one with a really ...


32

Vacuum near the point of drilling Have someone to stand next to you with the nozzle of a (running) vacuum cleaner, and position it very carefully near the where the drill bit enters the wall. Preferably - under the drill point facing up, so as not to "compete" with gravity. Most of the dust should be caught by the vacuum cleaner. Down-sides to this ...


30

Get it wet! When drilling or cutting stone, using water to cool the bit will help cut faster and smoother and prolong the life of the bit. When drilling in the wet hole, you don't need a special drill because all of the electrics are safely away from the water. When using a saw or grinder, one made for wet cutting is recommended. Of course, using water ...


18

I'll echo the comment and say that you should make sure you have a proper P-trap installed under the sink. This trap holds water and provides a seal against sewer gases getting up into the bathroom. Without one, gases will leak in constantly, and will be displaced by water down the drain which can force the gases up into the bathroom even if normally it's ...


18

I've installed several systems in new construction projects up to about 6,000 s.f., one of which was a log home. (That was interesting.) No, you don't necessarily get better performance. It's all about convenience and not having to deal with dusty bags or canisters except maybe once a year. A really good standalone unit will at least equal a central vac ...


18

In addition to the halved tennis ball trick, when drilling walls, I usually use Post-It notes. Take one sheet, fold it horizontally away from the sticky side, then stick it to the wall just below the hole you're drilling. The fold will open up just a bit under its own weight. As you drill, the dust will accumulate in this fold - once the hole is done, ...


16

Yes it is typical, but a conscientious contractor will pick them up with a magnet or not let them drop to begin with. Sadly, from my experience, not many workers do. Cost of the nails versus the time needed to pick them up, it is cheaper to leave them. I would call and let the contractor know you are not content with the nails everywhere, see if any action ...


16

Wait until it dries and use a razor blade to scrape it off.


15

224 x 10^6 Hundredweight per acre.


13

Does it smell when you turn on the tap and catch the water in a bowl (so it doesn't go down the drain)? If so, it's something in the faucet. Take off the aerator cap and look for gunk inside, and/or look in the barrel of the faucet if you can to clean it out. You can also consider replacing the faucet. (I am assuming that since this only affects the ...


13

I am using this tool (Kärcher DDC 50). You put the drill through the hole on the right, and the battery-driven vacuum not only sucks the dust into the storage container but also sucks the entire tool onto the wall, making this a hands-free operation. Careful with wallpapers - sometimes the suction is too strong and you might see some creases afterwards. ...


12

There are a bunch of different ways that nails wind up on the ground, and none of them are really avoidable. They fall out of nail pouches, they'll kick out and go flying if you hit them wrong with a hammer or double fire with a nailer, crowbars send them flying, etc., etc., etc. On top of this, individual nails are really hard to find in the grass, even ...


12

Put them in the grill and get them HOT! Then use a wire brush and scrub the scale and rust off. After that I usually coat them with olive oil but any cooking oil will work.


12

Like anything else, can be done well or poorly. Having seen some done poorly, those are a waste of money. Short sharp turns, improperly arranged tees make keeping the system free of clogs a pain, when the system is clogged it does not vacuum very well. Then people resort back to portable vacuum cleaners. Less dust in the house: well, that depends on where ...


10

Squirt bottle Wet the wall area just as you start, then as soon as the bit is seated, use one hand to squirt a small amount of water at the hole in frequent intervals. This will assure the stuff comes out as mud. The point of the squirt bottle is to allow you to tightly regulate the amount of water, so you aren't adding any more water than needed to do ...


9

Painting a pressure treated wood deck is always tricky. Pressure treated wood does not seem to hold paint well, even with a good primer. Stain is usually a better alternative, but since your deck already has paint, it would have to be stripped completely before using stain. In order for the paint to stick fairly well, the surface needs to be as clean and ...


9

If the pros couldn't do much, It sounds like the stain is there for good. Some suggestions: small throw rug/welcome mat. Just cover it up! bring in a pro to swap that bit of carpet with maybe something in a closet, or just a far corner. A good carpet pro should be able to seam it all back together. dye the entire carpet a shade or two darker. I know such ...


9

I have cleaned gutters at multiple one-story houses by kneeling down from the roof, but I wouldn't risk it on a two-story house. If you have a two-story house or are wary of cleaning the gutters from a one-story roof, then you have two options: As BMitch has said, get a stabilizer bar (~$25-75; I recommend this one as it is easy to adjust and has no nuts ...


9

A combination of my "vacuum near drill point" answer and @mrks' mini-vacuum Karcher device answer: You can get a (hopefully) universal vacuum cleaner collector attachment for collecting drilling dust: and then you can use your large independent vacuum cleaner; the head should attach to the surface you're drilling into by the force of the vacuum: However,...


8

Once Great Stuff foam hardens, it can only be removed via abrasive means (such as sandpaper). Water causes it to harden. Before it hardens, it can be removed with acetone. Be careful with acetone because it toxic (You can find a copy of the acetone MSDS online for details on its safety).


8

The easiest and most cost effective way of dealing with it is to paint over it with something like drylok. You can't really do anything about the smell itself other than removing the epoxy but you can put up a good barrier.


8

Probably you are hoping to spray some Miracle Vanishing Formula™, instantly wipe, and be good as new. Maybe it is possible to do that, or use a putty knife carefully. In the end, you will probably have added scratches, and there are probably defects and worn portions screaming for refinishing. So why not skip to the (seemingly) inevitable conclusion:...


8

The cover of the detergent cup is not opening when its supposed to. If you need to expose the cup to investigate, it is not opening at all. The spring loaded cover is held closed over the detergent by a little catch. There is a solenoid in the door that pulls on the catch, letting the cover spring open. This happens at the start of the main wash cycle. The ...


8

It's fairly typical. Nails get dropped, nails are struck poorly and go flying. Nails are not hugely expensive (modern era - supposedly in the era that they were hand-made one at a time, folks would burn down old houses for the nails, though I am dubious that that is an accurate claim.) Carpenters are fairly expensive and not fond of playing janitor. If the ...


8

Cut a tennis ball in half. Drill a hole in the center of one half, slide the half over the drill bit, line up the drill and bit to where the hole is to be. Slide the half ball up against the wall and start drilling. The half ball will catch the dust and keep it from getting into the air...


7

Yes, the pressure washer will dig out the sand between the bricks. I would not recommend it. I would suggest a stiff brush with dish detergent mixed with water. If that is not strong enough try some professional paver cleaning products from your local home improvement store.


7

I have read that an iron can help lift those water marks off the table. If I remember correctly... Lay a dry cloth over the mark Heat the iron with the steam turned off Briefly iron the spot, gradually increasing the length of time you apply the heat I haven't tried it myself, so try it at your own risk.


7

Creosote from wood fires is the main reason, so no, cleaning from that standpoint isn't needed.


7

My experience is that the black growth actually gets right into the bath mat material and cannot be easily removed. I suggest that you replace the mat and then use an alternate procedure when stowing the mat after use. After use always rinse it off well so no bath scum and other things are left on it. Then hang it up over a towel bar, suction cut side up, ...


7

First I "paint out" the brush (try to paint scrap material, cardboard etc.) until the brush is too dry to paint. Then: Latex paints Assuming I have flowing tap water on site, I rinse the brush with lots of water, we're talking gallons. Then when most of the paint is out of it, I start working in whichever hand or dish soap is convenient, both the clean ...


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