33

Vacuum near the point of drilling Have someone to stand next to you with the nozzle of a (running) vacuum cleaner, and position it very carefully near the where the drill bit enters the wall. Preferably - under the drill point facing up, so as not to "compete" with gravity. Most of the dust should be caught by the vacuum cleaner. Down-sides to this ...


32

4000 PSI is too much or a shitload of pressure. I would never use it on high on anything that I was cleaning at a home. Even brick work could get damaged of up close 4000 PSI. Probably the only thing I would use it for is cleaning my driveway but even then I would probably use a fan nozzle. 4000 PSI would just rip the paint off a home - one with a really ...


30

Get it wet! When drilling or cutting stone, using water to cool the bit will help cut faster and smoother and prolong the life of the bit. When drilling in the wet hole, you don't need a special drill because all of the electrics are safely away from the water. When using a saw or grinder, one made for wet cutting is recommended. Of course, using water ...


18

I'll echo the comment and say that you should make sure you have a proper P-trap installed under the sink. This trap holds water and provides a seal against sewer gases getting up into the bathroom. Without one, gases will leak in constantly, and will be displaced by water down the drain which can force the gases up into the bathroom even if normally it's ...


18

I've installed several systems in new construction projects up to about 6,000 s.f., one of which was a log home. (That was interesting.) No, you don't necessarily get better performance. It's all about convenience and not having to deal with dusty bags or canisters except maybe once a year. A really good standalone unit will at least equal a central vac ...


18

In addition to the halved tennis ball trick, when drilling walls, I usually use Post-It notes. Take one sheet, fold it horizontally away from the sticky side, then stick it to the wall just below the hole you're drilling. The fold will open up just a bit under its own weight. As you drill, the dust will accumulate in this fold - once the hole is done, ...


16

Yes it is typical, but a conscientious contractor will pick them up with a magnet or not let them drop to begin with. Sadly, from my experience, not many workers do. Cost of the nails versus the time needed to pick them up, it is cheaper to leave them. I would call and let the contractor know you are not content with the nails everywhere, see if any action ...


15

224 x 10^6 Hundredweight per acre.


15

Wait until it dries and use a razor blade to scrape it off.


13

Does it smell when you turn on the tap and catch the water in a bowl (so it doesn't go down the drain)? If so, it's something in the faucet. Take off the aerator cap and look for gunk inside, and/or look in the barrel of the faucet if you can to clean it out. You can also consider replacing the faucet. (I am assuming that since this only affects the ...


13

I am using this tool (Kärcher DDC 50). You put the drill through the hole on the right, and the battery-driven vacuum not only sucks the dust into the storage container but also sucks the entire tool onto the wall, making this a hands-free operation. Careful with wallpapers - sometimes the suction is too strong and you might see some creases afterwards. ...


12

This stuff is sick: http://www.evapo-rust.com/ I used it on a drill press my buddy left out on a patio in the rain for a year. Virtually no scrubbing. I don't understand how this is not one of the most widely known products in the world. It is THAT good. I guess with the military as a client, they don't need the business from the public. Here are some ...


12

There are a bunch of different ways that nails wind up on the ground, and none of them are really avoidable. They fall out of nail pouches, they'll kick out and go flying if you hit them wrong with a hammer or double fire with a nailer, crowbars send them flying, etc., etc., etc. On top of this, individual nails are really hard to find in the grass, even ...


12

Put them in the grill and get them HOT! Then use a wire brush and scrub the scale and rust off. After that I usually coat them with olive oil but any cooking oil will work.


12

Like anything else, can be done well or poorly. Having seen some done poorly, those are a waste of money. Short sharp turns, improperly arranged tees make keeping the system free of clogs a pain, when the system is clogged it does not vacuum very well. Then people resort back to portable vacuum cleaners. Less dust in the house: well, that depends on where ...


10

To remove surface mold I use a 4:1 mixture of water:bleach. Spray on liberally and allow to sit for about 15 minutes. Rinse with water and wipe clean. If you need to use a brush to scrape off heavy deposits, I recommend brushing away from your face or preferably wear an appropriate mask and goggles. The mold spores are probably more dangerous than the ...


10

Without looking, I think most of these adhesive foams dissolve with acetone. The first thing I'd try would be nail polish remover, or possibly Goof Off.


10

Vinegar is an acid. It's a mild acid, but it's an acid nonetheless. You might want to find a different brand of spray bottle that is chemical resistant... mine seem to keep working, but I buy them from a janitorial supply store. I know the one time I put a vinegar and water solution in one of my girlfriend's spray bottles, which were artsy and came from a ...


10

Squirt bottle Wet the wall area just as you start, then as soon as the bit is seated, use one hand to squirt a small amount of water at the hole in frequent intervals. This will assure the stuff comes out as mud. The point of the squirt bottle is to allow you to tightly regulate the amount of water, so you aren't adding any more water than needed to do ...


9

This is a problem best suited to the professionals, but if you must do it yourself the number one priority is the safety of you and those around you. This can be a very hazardous task, if you do not take every precaution to contain and remove the spores properly. The first thing you'll have to think about is containment, you don't want to spread the mold ...


9

I wouldn't worry about the scum left over - what you really need to do is get rid of the BIG gunk that's catching the little gunk that eventually clogs your sink. For clogged drains, a hand held auger is your tool of choice for cleaning stubborn clogs out of bathroom pipes.


9

The way I've done this is not using water, instead take the roller or brush and put in a big ziplock bag and stick in the fridge. yes it may look gross in there but it won't be a problem to return to continue painting. It won't be able to dry as much. Certainily it won't dry out. Seems like my wife left one in there for a couple days to return AND multiple ...


9

Painting a pressure treated wood deck is always tricky. Pressure treated wood does not seem to hold paint well, even with a good primer. Stain is usually a better alternative, but since your deck already has paint, it would have to be stripped completely before using stain. In order for the paint to stick fairly well, the surface needs to be as clean and ...


9

If the pros couldn't do much, It sounds like the stain is there for good. Some suggestions: small throw rug/welcome mat. Just cover it up! bring in a pro to swap that bit of carpet with maybe something in a closet, or just a far corner. A good carpet pro should be able to seam it all back together. dye the entire carpet a shade or two darker. I know such ...


9

I have cleaned gutters at multiple one-story houses by kneeling down from the roof, but I wouldn't risk it on a two-story house. If you have a two-story house or are wary of cleaning the gutters from a one-story roof, then you have two options: As BMitch has said, get a stabilizer bar (~$25-75; I recommend this one as it is easy to adjust and has no nuts ...


9

Cut a tennis ball in half. Drill a hole in the center of one half, slide the half over the drill bit, line up the drill and bit to where the hole is to be. Slide the half ball up against the wall and start drilling. The half ball will catch the dust and keep it from getting into the air...


9

A combination of my "vacuum near drill point" answer and @mrks' mini-vacuum Karcher device answer: You can get a (hopefully) universal vacuum cleaner collector attachment for collecting drilling dust: and then you can use your large independent vacuum cleaner; the head should attach to the surface you're drilling into by the force of the vacuum: However,...


8

Once Great Stuff foam hardens, it can only be removed via abrasive means (such as sandpaper). Water causes it to harden. Before it hardens, it can be removed with acetone. Be careful with acetone because it toxic (You can find a copy of the acetone MSDS online for details on its safety).


8

A cheap and easy solution would be to strap an air filter to a box fan and run it in the room for awhile. I've seen several variations of the basic concept. Here is one example: Build a do-it-yourself air purifier for about $25


8

The easiest and most cost effective way of dealing with it is to paint over it with something like drylok. You can't really do anything about the smell itself other than removing the epoxy but you can put up a good barrier.


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