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17

One issue that you don't seem to account for is that the cut edge of a tile is going to look slightly different than a factory edge. For some tiles, it's very obvious that you have a cut piece in the middle of the wall, so cuts are normally reserved for the corners where the edges will be hidden. Natural tiles like marble or travertine are a solid material ...


17

As suggested by @Ecnerwal, I wrote to Custom Building Products' customer support. Got a reply within 15 minutes: The isolated areas look to be a bit of sealer residue that might not have been wiped or rubbed dry with dry paper towels after each application within 3 minutes of each application? If so, this can be safely scrubbed off at any time, using a ...


12

I've cut plenty of tile and don't recall kickback occurring, at least in the sense we think of with table saws. For one thing, the rotating mass of a 4" diamond wheel is a small fraction of that of a 12" table saw blade. For another, it's almost physically impossible to get the kind of sudden engagement of blade to material with a diamond wheel and ...


10

Kickback yes. Kickback like most have experienced trying to push a 4x8 through a crappy table saw... no What you will get with a tile saw is more of a blip. And the structure of the saw or table may "move" but it won't be with any umpphhh. What will happen more likely is that your tile will jerk (a tiny bit normally but I have seen guys have ...


10

Well, design is always subjective and your question is probably unanswerable because of this fact. Would you be willing to incorporate a 7" section of smaller backsplash tiles to that transition from shower to sink? What if you did it in the corner of the shower? What about up the middle where the showerhead is like this: Have you considered how hard ...


9

Kickback on a toothed saw occurs because you're forcing more material into the tooth than the cutting force can handle, so the cutting force is translated into movement force. A tile saw has no teeth. It's an abrasive cutter (hence why it's a wet cutter as well). It's not impossible, but as DMoore notes, it's either a function of over-pushing or dull blades. ...


7

With the wall behind the tiles being drywall you would be wise go rip the tiles and drywall down Removing the tiles will tear the paper and possibly take chunks of the gypsum out. Even going very slow and trying the Sheetrock will be heavily damaged. I would rip the tile down with the Sheetrock, we can’t tell how wide the wall is but it will be much faster ...


7

Did you use all the grout at once? Some grouts aren't dry mixed well at at the factory. If you read the fine print it will say to mix the dry grout BEFORE adding water to. So if you do it in batches and didn't mix it, you'll get uneven results. When you wash it, it's just getting wet and hiding the problem.


6

It is probably failing because grout was in the gap prior to you caulking over it and it was not clean enough. The gap should not have been grouted at all. You should remove all of the caulk and grout, use a retractable utility knife and a five in one tool to clean it out. Use the flexibility of the knife to get as much of the old caulk out of the gap and ...


5

This appears to be very shoddy workmanship. I can't tell a lot about how plumb the walls may or may not be but the wallboard has to be done properly in order to get good results once the tile is applied. However, it doesn't appear the tiler is very knowledgeable or skilled with properly installing tile. He/she should be using spacers between all of those ...


5

Looks like more than a 1/4", so you can't use a Caddy RLC, you will need to use an extender like an Arlington BE1 or Raco add-a-depth ring. Raco's are a bit spooky but easier to install. Because of the mud you will probably have to remove bottom screw before you can wiggle the top out. NEC 314.20 Flush-Mounted Installations. Installations within or ...


4

Best practice is that something at the lower edge of the wall should come down on top of the finished floor surface. If you install baseboard alone then that should be installed last over the finished floor. On the other hand if the plan is to install a base board plus base shoe then you could choose to install the baseboard first and then run the finished ...


4

You will need to dig out the top of the receptacle mounting plate where it is underneath the tile and tile backing board. That's going to be a pain. Hopefully you won't have to shave off any of the tile, it's hard to say, just borderline. Then you can move the receptacle forwards with spacers. These spacers can stack by snapping together to raise the ...


4

A diamond-tipped bit will drill through either material so just buy it. Trying to save 50% on a carbide bit for ceramic tile is just not worth the risk of ruining potentially porcelain tile.


4

I suspect that the tile is being fed at a slight bias. This can result in one side of the cutting edge of the blade working differently on the cut edge of the tile. It can also result in tearout at the rear of the blade due to dragging. Check wither the feed motion of your table aligns perfectly with the position of the saw blade.


3

Good to be proactive and catch this before the tile goes up. Obvious problems I see are that the drywall is poorly cut (can take it out and trace it to re-cut a matching piece without gaps or overcut at almost no cost so easily fixed). Any of a drywall cutout tool, a Dremel, a keyhole saw, a hacksaw blade or a drill with a side cut bit can cut the piece ...


3

There is no right or wrong answer to this as it depends on personal preference. If it were me I would strongly consider not using a transition strip, to remove an additional element which would require extra work to install and maintain. A simple grout joint between the two tile types would probably be fine.


3

You don't repair it, you patch it, and don't use the toothpaste. I have seen repairs done with a small bead of caulk. You can rub it in good and then clean up the tile. This looks like hell. You could also use some white or clear acrylic nail polish and carefully go over the cracks. The problem is someone probably cracked that tile by kicking it and it could ...


3

I've never heard of or done grout in two layers. It will lose much of it's strength. If the grout line is greater than 1/8", hopefully sanded grout was used. The grout in your picture looks as if it was prematurely dried and cracked as a result. To fix this, get a grout saw and remove the grout down to the thinset. Mix up a small batch according to ...


3

That is not a really wet location I would leave it, I just hope they used a setting type joint compound. This may be an opinion as others may say omg it must be replaced but in the 50’s and 60’s it was common to tile the entire shower over drywall. If the shower was re sealed it lasted 30-40 years if not only ~20 years or that has been my experience on ...


3

These are designed to be screwed to the floor. Install guide from the Orange Store Since your floor is tile, if using screws you'd want to mark the screw holes with the guide in position, then drill the holes carefully with a carbide-tipped bit just larger than the screw - the screw should not touch the edges of the hole at all to prevent the tile from ...


3

The Popping and the Water Your two pictures, especially the second showing the bonding, and the your description about the knocking are revealing, and they are related. The second picture shows large voids in the cement/thinset. Floor tiles must have more than 80%, preferably around 90% cement fill and bonding, where the voids are sporadic, small and ...


2

First you need to figure out "how is water getting into my wall"? Do you have access on the other side. Is there an apparent gap? If you can push tile, there is literally mush/mold behind it. Your solution is simple. Take down tile and wall and fix it right. There is no other solution because the all involve more money, more time, and more ...


2

When grout is applied per label instructions it should only take 24 hours for the grout to cure. I think they recommend an additional 24 hours before you can seal it. If you had not applied any grout sealer the grout will absorb water (and become slightly darker), but it should not be soft or pliable after 10-12 hours. If it is still soft and can be molded ...


2

The grout has not cured. A couple of possible reasons are that perhaps it was old and deteriorated or it was improperly mixed. Either way, at this point it's unlikely to cure properly. I'd pull it out and re-do the grout making sure to use fresh material that is mixed properly. Always follow the manufacturer's instructions for curing time and conditions.


2

I have good news for you - it does not matter! Whether you tile over or under the lip (it's over and should be obvious why), you will absolutely be destroying the bottom of the water proofing of that shower/tub system - either way. There is no way you are getting a tub out and a new one back in like they are lego blocks. Good luck, never seen it - ever. ...


2

No slope is a bad idea - sure, you can have the joy of vacuuming up water on the platform after every shower or bath...no, really you want drainage. If the tub (as usual) stays put, you can set the tub level, and slope the surface around it (or under it, other than where the feet sit, if it has feet) to drain. Honestly, my first thought here is that the tub ...


2

I'd just remove the plaster the rest of the way in the area of interest and replace it with backerboard / cementboard. Tile is expensive in both materials cost and labor. Putting tile on a dubious substrate is, therefore, a poor choice. If the substrate fails, your expense in both money & time invested is lost. The slight additional money and labor to ...


2

It will quite possibly ruin the waterproofing layer under the tile. It is best to let it set up, roughen the glossy surface of the tile and set new tile directly over the first. There will most likely need to be an extension ring added to the drain to get it to the new level.


2

The answer you are looking for is... it is up to you. Baseboards are there... To make sure a wall does not get kicked or damaged at the bottom. To hide flooring gaps. For decoration For a good excuse to buy a mitre saw. Depending on the type of flooring you install you will want to adjust your base boards or even install different types. Michael says ...


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