13

Actually, @Edwin gave you a good answer. I'll add a bit to it. The bubbles are usually from not mixing the mud well enough or not applying it with enough pressure. It is not unusual to see lots of small bubbles on the first coat. The second coat is going to be thinner and applied with a bit more pressure and wider knife or trowel than the first. Here's a ...


13

There have got to be many ways to minimize the bubbles. These kind of problems you deal with when finishing drywall require a certain amount of skill that, for me, comes only with experience. That said, I have a few ideas: Add a little bit of water. The further along in the finishing process, the thinner the compound should be. Mix well, even if you add ...


8

Seal tightly and hope. I've had it stay good for a decade. Worst that happens is you throw it out then.


7

Better plan: cut out the damaged drywall and install a low-voltage bracket and coax barrel wallplate Some cheap-arse folks do what you see here -- simply punch a hole in the drywall to run low-voltage cabling through. While this sort-of-works, it leads to ugly results like the ones you see here. It's much better to do the neat and tidy thing and install a ...


7

Remove high spots by hand sanding the entire wall with a flat, rigid 1/2-sheet sanding block and 80 grit paper. It's ok to remove too much, but stop wherever you start to see the sheet rock facing paper or joint tape. Ideally, 100% of the wall will have been sanded. For the areas (if any) where the paper shows before all the ridges (as in your photo) are ...


7

Tape goes in early. The tape is providing a paper face across the joint just as the paper face of the board does across the wallboard surface, and wants to be bonded as close to that surface as possible. So, it's generally embedded in the first coat of mud. Mud, tape, mud over tape, build up to a smooth surface. You are not spackling, you are mudding joints ...


5

You can use either spackle or joint compound. I personally detest the modern "light weight" versions of spackle and will not use them. I use joint compound for most repair applications around drywall. The dry time has never been a big problem for me as most projects are big enough that there are plenty of other tasks to attend to whilst the joint compound ...


5

The compound is a complex combination often including water, limestone, expanded perlite, ethylene-vinyl acetate polymer, attapulgite, and other ingredients, this was from online , but it answers the question of what's it made of.


4

Wet Sanding If you want a smooth surface, you could try wet sanding it. Purchase a drywall sanding sponge (~$4.00 at any home improvement store), and use that for the final sanding pass. Fill a bucket with water. Dunk the sponge in the water, and then wring it out to remove as much excess water as possible. Using a light circular motion, buff the compound ...


4

Turn the adjusting knob on the locking pliers so that it takes both hands to clamp them shut on the screw head and squashes some small flats into the screw head when shut. Hold your locking pliers flat against the wall Clamp them shut Unscrew You want the pliers so tight that you can barely get them clamped. That will get you the maximum grip on the screw ...


3

If the drywall has a substantial amount of texture, you'll find 'texture in a spray can' at your favorite big box store. Probably get the one that says, "orange peel" on the label. Like this: spray texture If it's just a tiny bit of texture, use a thick nap paint roller and start putting coats on. You'll have some texture in no time.


3

It is hard to tell from the picture but I am guessing you are using a traditional screen and you are moving the screen back and forth along one of the axes of the screen. If the less than stellar ascii art below is your screen, instead of instead of moving N-S or E-W move the screen NE-SW or NW-SE. Or start with the screen rotated 45 degrees and continue to ...


3

The really important thing to know about spackle is that it can't be used for skim coating (that is any area with an exposed face) because the molecules are too far apart to offer sufficient surface area for adhesion (I asked the manufacturer). There may be exceptions but if you read the label even those that are "self priming" exclude use for skim coating. ...


3

I think spackle should be discontinued as a product because it dosen't offer a lot of benefits and the hazard that people often fail to read about is that it cannot be used for skim coating (that is, filling a surface area) because paint will not stick to it. At the molecular level there isn't sufficient surface area for the paint to touch to adhere reliably....


3

There are lots of different kinds of asbestos and it’s in all kinds of building products. You’re right to be careful. We’ve had our remodeling projects tested for many years (30+) and a testing agency just found it in the window glazing compound..the stuff that holds the glass tight to the wood window frame. That’s a new one for me. I guess my point is ...


3

Nope. Use proper drywall tape of either the paper or fiberglass varieties. Both are cheap and won't leave you with a gooey, hollow, fragile mess. I also recommend proper joint compound. Spackle is very light and soft and not suitable for filling large depressions. If you're dealing with concrete or regular moisture, consider a setting-type compound for ...


3

Spackle is a brand name for a wall patching compound. Joint compound is what is used to smooth over the butt joints and corners of newly installed drywall aka gypsum wallboard in order to achieve a finished surface. Setting type joint compound such as Durabond 45 or similar (the number indicates the 'open time' or workable time but it's usually ...


3

Usually something like this: Enlarge the hole to something like 4 x 6 inches. Cut a scrap of drywall about 5.5 x 8. Drill a couple of holes in the center of the patch. Tie a loop of cord through the pair of holes. Leave enough slack to get a good grip. Maneuver the patch through the hole, rotate it to cover the hole, then secure with dry wall screws ...


2

Unless the tape is badly torn up or loose, just sand high spots and then put one or two coats of drywall compound over it. I have no experience using DAP spackle as joint compound - mostly because I'm a professional and just use joint compound for joints. Spackle is more expensive when you're dealing with large quantities. It would make a better job to go ...


2

You are getting these because the compound going on is too thick. My drywall guys start with a small bucket of powder and water and mix to the consistency of pancake syrup and then add the premixed stuff in. Basically to the point where it barely doesn't drive you nuts. It will make a mess no doubt because you will have drop everywhere. But this allows ...


2

Forget the spackling. Fiber joint tape should never be used in a corner - use Paper Joint Tape instead. It has a seam down the middle, so you can fold it into the corner. Scrape out the old joint tape, removing any loose compound along the way. Ensure both surfaces are securely attached, to their framing members. Sand any high spots if needed and apply ...


2

Painting is easy - preparing for a new coat of paint so it will last is the hard work. You should scrape off all loose or peeling paint - otherwise the new paint will simply peel right off there. Only after that should you move to spackle and sanding to prepare the base for new paint. On wood items "putty" is preferred over "spackle" which is more of a ...


2

Spackle is just a cosmetic fix; you do not want to put any weight on it. You should repair the wall with a small piece of drywall, or use toggle bolts to secure your curtain rod. They need larger holes anyway, so you wouldn't necessarily need to repair anything.


2

Only the lightest of curtains should be hung with hollow-wall anchors in the first place, even if you use togglers (anchors with mechanically-deployed wings). Screw-in or expanding drive-in anchors are almost guaranteed to fail after a short time, and heavy or frequently manipulated curtains should be mounted into framing. To your question, if you fill the ...


2

I'd use actual joint compound. I'm not sure what you're referring to with "spackle", but in my experience it's a very fluffy, soft product. Get some topping or repair compound and apply it twice (it'll shrink a bit), then sand lightly. Prime and paint. It's not necessary to replace the panel or use joint tape for surface scratches, even if they're through ...


2

Spackle's just fine. The real trick is replicating the texture!


2

I found the canned texture stuff to be gimmicky. What I typically do when finishing walls after spackling is mix a bit of joint compound with a bit of water. Take a brush with bristles, dip it in the mixture, hold brush with bristles facing upwards towards the wall, and run your finger through the bristles essentially flicking the mixture onto the wall. You ...


2

Muralo's Spackle™ shrinks as it dries. If you keep applying thin layers and letting them dry, you will eventually achieve a flat surface. If the Spackle is proud of the surrounding surface you should be able to sand it flat.


2

Cracks like that occur because of, 1) settlement, or 2) expansion/contraction. 1) If the House was built in 1970’s, then it has finished settling. Unless there is some underground work in the area, like new utilities, new piling, etc. 2) I suspect it’s expansion/contraction due to the joint compound being too wet. There is no need to “wait for it to ...


2

Try using a single edge razor blade. Don't just use the tip or you'll scratch the cabinet, use the entire sharp edge and lightly push it across the surface. You can add a little water and it will make it easier. Use a blade similar to the one below, you want the rigid edge so the blade doesn't bend and scratch the cabinet.


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