Hot answers tagged

20

Here is how I have done it before without anything more than what I was already using, the material, pencil, a tape measure and a miter box.


19

You can make straight cuts parallel to an existing edge by using a circular saw with a guide. To make the bottom edge of the cut clean, be sure the saw does not cut much more deeply than the thickness of the material. You can also put tape on the cut line, before cutting, to prevent the saw from breaking off small pieces of the material on the top edge of ...


18

A sliding bevel, which is a fairly low-cost tool designed for exactly this type of job - the blade can be set to match an unknown angle and locked, then it can either be measured, or used directly in setting, or used to draw a line. No affiliation with or recommendation of the image source. Or, a piece of cardboard or stiff paper (fold or cut to match the ...


13

My experience says to use the rotary tool, but I have always used metal boxes with plaster rings. I have no experience cutting drywall over plastic boxes. I do have three pointers for cutting with a rotary tool: Put as little pressure on the box from the drywall as possible. The more pressure against the drywall, the more likely that you'll get tearout ...


10

If you want to rip it (cut it on its long dimension), the only way to be sure it is straight is to use a table saw: If you want to cross cut it (on its short dimension), you can do that with a miter saw if the piece is not too wide: If you are confident in your abilities and it does not need to be exactly straight, you can make a line with a chalk line and ...


10

You can't figure this out without knowing how many boards your circle will have; once you choose the number of boards, just divide 360 by the number of bevels (one for each end of each board) and that's how far from 90° each end should be. So, if you have 4 boards (a square): 4 * 2 = 8 bevelled ends 360° / 8 = 45° each end should have a 45° bevel on it: ...


9

The most likely solution is to create a template and use a router with a bit that follows the template. The router would also be used for easing over any sharp edges. photo credit, sample image, not a product recommendation


8

Back in the day when I used to put up vinyl siding, I found that the best way to cut it with a circular saw was with a cheap 140 tooth plywood blade installed backwards (to give the teeth a negative rake and prevent chipping): For really hard plastics, I've used a diamond abrasive blade before and that did a great job (these are incredibly expensive if we'...


8

It sounds like you're using a crappy copper pipe cutter. To cut PVC, you want one of these instead: I've used mine to cut thousands of PVC pipes and it does the job quickly and easily. You can probably find one for less than $10 and it will serve you well for life.


8

I'd try to go through the slab and then below it. Most slabs are 6" thick with gravel underneath. You can rent a concrete core drill for around $60 from home depot. Stick a hole in your slab. Then you can use something called a 'sidewalk sleever' to tunnel under the slab. Then install pipe (a little tricky due to the elbow, and fill your hole back up ...


7

I prefer to hang the drywall loosely and use a rotary tool. But make sure you use a bit designed for this purpose -- the proper bit will have cutting flutes that don't extend all the way along the length of the bit, leaving a smooth round tip. This tip will follow the contours of the box without cutting into it, even if it's a plastic box. Note that if you ...


7

I've cut chair mats by laying them on a flat work surface. Then secure a metal straight edge along the cut line. (In my case I clamped a long piece of aluminum bar stock in place to the work surface with the mat in between). A utility knife with a sharp blade was then used to score a cut line along the straight edge. Chair mats are a relatively soft plastic ...


7

It's entirely possible, and often reasonable. Without going as far as buying a CNC router (handy, but expensive) simple jigs and sleds permit cutting precisely circular holes (eat your heart out, jigsaws) and precisely straight edges (like a tablesaw with no need to use a jointer afterwards - indeed, many people with tablesaws use a router jig to joint ...


7

jigsaw. but really i think you underestimate how easy it is to cut through dimensional lumber with a sharp handsaw.


6

Gaps around boxes are normal when hanging drywall. The standard tool for a beginner is a keyhole saw and careful measuring. Realize when measuring that drywall will likely have up to a 1/4" gap with whatever it's adjacent to, so pad your measurements appropriately. That padding also needs to account for the box itself. So with the wonders of ascii art, you ...


6

Chalk. Rub chalk over the boxes and tap the drywall against it. The chalk outline will appear on the back of the drywall and you can cut a pretty tight hole.


6

It can be done, but to use a router to cut wood is not optimum. Jigging a router can be more complex and a router will usually cut out a much wider swath and create way more sawdust and wood chips. The router will also cut much slower in thicker materials and has big learning curve issues regarding proper direction of cut. When you start considering a ...


6

What these layers are, I know one is drywall, oddly enough its the inner layer, but I dont know the other 2. You have plasterboard, followed by plaster "brown coat", followed by finish plaster "skim coat/color coat" How can I repair the chipping that took place? Is it just spackle like normal drywall? Traditional spackle would work is there ...


5

It will probably be 3 to 6 hours of non-skilled labor (neighborhood kids?) to dig up the concrete and remove the whole assembly. Don't cut the post off: it will help wiggle out the base. Dig a hole immediately to one side of the concrete base of a convenient size. (There is no need to dig all around it.) A post hole digger works great. Make the hole at ...


5

Absolutely not!! Go for it, but hang on tight to the pipe, it has a tenancy to roll in a chop saw.


5

You need a diamond tile saw, where you put the tile on a platform and slide it past the water-cooled blade. They are fast, precise and good for the hardest porcelain tiles. Expect to pay $300 and up. Straight cuts are the easiest. To cut out a square corner, make the two cuts with the tile upside down. The back of the tile will be a mess, but the business-...


5

A good utility knife is all you need. It will give you a cleaner cut and it's faster.


5

Sounds like what you're after is resawing-- which is typically done on a band saw with a wide blade. Then you have to clean up the saw marks, which does take some thickness away. So you may end up with two 3/8" pieces rather than 1/2".


5

Holding the saw with one hand is an advanced, and unsafe technique. You'll often find that folks in the construction industry (especially those on YouTube), do not follow proper safety precautions. Holding the saw with two hands will reduce the chances of the saw kicking uncontrollably, if the saw happens to bind or hit a foreign object. It also insures ...


5

In addition to the two previous answers (which can be used on the same project; some boards are easier with one method or the other), I'd like to point out another idea that is good for especially tricky spots or boosting confidence. Even when well-practised, there will be cuts you do not want to mess up or extreme cases like a brick fireplace surround. ...


5

There is a tool that is made for cutting out the PVC pipe in a joint so that it may be used again. That tool may be useful to square up the end of the pipe in this case if you were able to hold the tool inline with the pipe while it shaves off the high part of the pipe. This is what one example of the tool looks like. These are used to chucking up the ...


5

Of course you can use a router to cut through wood! It's done all the time. But, using a router to cut through wood is typically reserved to a CNC router. For humans, a jigsaw would be easier to control.


5

They make a handy sliding block with a blade that protrudes from the bottom, just like you describe. They are great for scoring and cutting thin sheet material like laminate:


5

Trapezoid razor blades are stronger, so they can be used for cutting thick or very tough materials better than snapping blades. Examples where I use this blade: Cutting carpet or vinyl Cutting/carving wood where cleanness of the cut isn’t important Snapping blades are super convenient when making lots of cuts on materials that dull or gum up blades quick ...


5

The issue is that normally, moldings around a door are very different from baseboard molding. You can easily bevel two identical moldings together; you can't do the same if the profiles are different. Of course, this begs the question: why are door moldings different from baseboard moldings? Well, mainly tradition; that's the way it's usually been. Lee Sam'...


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