74

The opening you want to create has to be framed like a window as shown*. Notice the addition of a header to carry the load of the cut stud (cripple stud) to the sides, and the added jack studs which support the header. Because you're only supporting a light weight cabinet rather than a window, you probably don't need the double sill (single will do). As ...


43

I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


29

Without looking at blueprints, all you can do is make an educated guess. Possible methods include: If it's an exterior wall it's almost always load bearing. If the joists are not continuous over the wall (they are cut short and meet on top of the wall) it is definitely load bearing. If there is a load bearing wall or beam directly above or below this wall, ...


28

It is absolutely UNSAFE! - this will damage the structural integrity of the wall! The load in a load-bearing stud wall is carried by the studs. Your options are: Surface mount the cabinet Flush mount the cabinet between studs Cut the stud and insert a beam to carry the load from the stud to the two studs either side. You will need to reinforce each side ...


25

No, it’s not acceptable to cut the joist hangers. In order to determine if they are acceptable anyway, there are several issues to review: 1) hangers are notched, 2) incomplete nailing, 3) wrong nails, 4) wrong install of fasteners (angled install in lieu of perpendicular to joist installation). 1) Notching the hangers voids the allowable stresses ...


24

This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


22

If this is a load-bearing wall you'll want to frame the pet door in, just like you would a window. This will allow you to properly carry the load down, and around the pet door. The king studs should go all the way from the top plate, down to the bottom plate. The header will be made up of 1/2" plywood/OSB, sandwiched between two 2x4s. If you don't want to ...


14

You really want to hire an expert. A house is probably the most expensive thing you will ever own; don't risk it if there is any doubt. Usually, walls which run perpendicular to floor joists are assumed to be load bearing until proven otherwise. That doesn't mean walls along floor joists are not load bearing, but it's much less likely. In older houses, ...


14

The framing above the pantry door is not load bearing. The doorway to the left of the pantry in the middle picture is load bearing. You can tell by the solid header.


13

Definitely get a home inspector to look over tbe place; there may be other damage from this subsidence... If the price is attractive enough that you'd consider trying to have this redone properly, I'd suggest getting an engineer who know the local soil and hydrology to look at it and tell you what it'd cost to redo this properly. Better to spend a few ...


13

Any information you'd glean from this discussion is untrustworthy for the following reasons: No photos. They often reveal issues not mentioned in your short description. No dimensions. In engineering, dimensions are key. No information about construction era or age. That would tell us a lot about common building techniques. No liability. Anyone telling ...


12

It is not safe to simply cut a hole in the studs, and while the safe probably would transfer the load, you do not know that the safe was designed to transfer vertical loads, or how it will react. The consequences of a mistake here could be severe long term. Therefore the proper course of action is to reframe the wall. Generally you would do this by adding ...


12

It has to do more with the quality of the the 2x6s vs the 4x6. A 4x6 x 12 board would have to be clear all the way through, with no cracks or knots. Most softwood logs won't produce this board, and if it cracks, it is likely to break more easily vs the 2x6. On the other hand, drilling a bunch of holes in a 2x6 does it no favors, though because the two ...


12

Cutting a hanger is never a good idea and should never be accepted. It's shoddy workmanship by the contractor and there were numerous solutions that could have avoided this (starting with properly measuring the bolt locations for the web blocking). However, the main issue is that these hangers are not designed for this application. They are meant to hang ...


12

Can I safely remove one stud from a load bearing wall? Yes, but you need to properly support the gap with a header. If you aren't willing to do this then don't remove the stud, period. Will this damage the integrity of the bearing wall? Without a header you are technically compromising the integrity of whatever the wall is holding up. At best the floor ...


10

International Residential Code 2012 Chapter 6 Wall Construction Section R602 Wood Wall Framing R602.7 Headers. For header spans see Tables R502.5(1) and R502.5(2). So if you're on the top floor, you can use 2 2x4's (unless the building is 36' wide, in which case you'll need 2 2x6's). If you have a floor above, you'll need 2 2x6's (...


10

3 for two reasons: Your walls are not meant for dynamic, changing loads such as those caused by swingset motions, so you don't know the potential damage long term; and I would hesitate very much to buy a house which had a physical connection to another person's house via a toy.


9

Can't say for sure why they did it in your situation, without knowing a bit more details. Typically blocking is installed to prevent framing members from twisting or warping, and to stiffen and add strength to the wall. Though it's also common to install blocking, where fire stops are required by code. Blocking can also provide an attachment point for ...


9

If your gut is telling you to run then run. But if you are still thinking about purchasing the house I would make sure that the builder gives you something in writing to back up what he/she is saying. If they are wiling to put it in writing then all is good, as long as they can be found if something does go wrong. Also ask the builder for the compaction ...


9

You never cut hangers unless they are made for cutting. Call in a inspector who will advise you or the engineer who done the design but don't under any circumstances let this go without it being checked. As further down the line could cost you a lot of money.


8

EDIT: On second look, the drawing actually tells us. There's a note box to the right: TYP BEARING WALL 2x4 stud 16" O.C. on Continuous footing. The dashed line around the wall indicates the footing. ORIGINAL: If I'm reading the drawing correctly, IT DEFINITELY IS. For the sake of this discussion, north is the top of the drawing. There appears to be a ...


8

When modifying load bearing walls and betting your house on the results, you are well served to hire a civil engineer to analyze the situation and tell you what will work, rather than guessing. It should not be terribly expensive.


7

OK normally load bearing walls will have 2 plates on top. But having 2 plates means nothing. People frame however they learned to or want. Checking door header also means nothing. Some people flip all door headers - doesn't make the wall load bearing. You can never get into the head of the guy who framed your house. I worked for a construction ...


7

Instead of using king studs on either side of the header, use jack studs. The jack studs take the load from the cripple and transfer it vertically to the floor. You could attach to king studs as you showed, but the problem is you now have to worry about sheer strength as well.


7

The blocks are known as Dwangs or Nogs here, and was confused about what blocks you were asking about. But they are used for stiffening the wall and attaching drywall, as well as mounting points for basins etc. Not heard of them being used for firestopping, and does not make a lot of sense to me. Recommendation from BRANZ (local building regulation ...


7

The plan will make the 4x4s look good. However, you did say they are LOAD BEARING, an epoxy is great for holding things together or protecting things, but terrible at withstanding stress from a load. The posts function is to transfer the weight above it to the ground, so filling in the rotted parts of the wood with epoxy is just hiding the problem. Most ...


7

There are lots of span calculators available online, which help you determine what size lumber to use in home or deck construction. For example http://www.awc.org/codes-standards/calculators-software/reversecalc and http://www.awc.org/codes-standards/calculators-software/spancalc You could try to figure out what the live loads and dead loads for the ...


7

Boards that are laminated in some fashion get an overall durability increase (not necessarily net strength increase) because they no longer suffer from a single grain dimension through the thickness. Primarily, in the case you describe a split or warp will not impact the whole board, only half of it. A properly laminated beam (like VersaLam or Glulam) does ...


7

The Scout Pioneering website contains information on how to build several bridges. I am guessing that most of these are more complicated than what you had in mind, so if you want something simpler, you can attempt flat span bridge using 2x12's for a span between 14 and 18 feet. On the latter page the author goes on to say that "[i]f you are thinking of ...


6

The Uni Knot is a slip knot that is adjustable. The Hangman's Noose is not typically considered adjustable. The Hangman's Noose when the loop is under load is pulling on the top of the knot as well as conventionally on the bottom of the knot which is truly tightening the knot. They are typically only used with thicker ropes because otherwise you run a risk ...


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