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I put the temp support as close as possible to the exterior wall, since it's needed only for the framing phase, not finishing. You should leave just enough space to slide in the new beam/header over the new window. Your studs are spaced about 24 o.c. which should be fine, even if the existing wall is studded at 16. After all, this is a temporary wall, and ...


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I think you have enough I rarely go beyond 4’ why 4’ because cut a 8’ or standard stud and just short of 4’. The diagonal brace can’t hurt but it is not really helping either the exterior sheathing is keeping it solid. I have done this many times and never had a problem.


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Use of long carriage headed bolts fitted into holes that are bored all the way through the post and also through the deck joist underneath will be a stronger connection. If bolts of 1/2" diameter are used (2 or 3 bolts depending upon the width of the deck joist) with flat washers and hex nuts they can be tightened a lot and be stronger than those two ...


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Sanity check, 1 metric ton = 1000 kgf, one half of it is 500 kgf, gar exceeds your need (that's good though). Even at 50 kgf, plus some dynamic lifting force, it is not a small load for a typical roof joist. For the safe bet, you should: Carefully look around the joists to find whether there is a tag that lists the name of the manufacturer, the type and ...


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Those are top chord bearing steel trusses. Their capacity is based on the span, spacing, size of steel webs, spacing of steel web connectors, etc. You’ll need to find a steel truss manufacturer to run the calculations based on size, spacing, etc. of your trusses. (It may not be exact, but they can get close.) Steel trusses are like spaghetti without lots of ...


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