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Like others have said you definitely need to re-enforce the trusses. You will also likely need to add additional trusses. The maximum unsupported span for drywall is 24". It's hard to tell but looking at the wall assuming the studs are on 16" spacing it looks like the trusses are spaced further apart than 24".


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No, you would need to reframe the ceiling with timbers that are continuous and rated to bear the load of a ceiling, rather than simple rafter ties. Timbers that are butted together like that are in tension - their job is to stop the roof from spreading outwards. Adding the weight of quite a significant amount of drywall underneath would make them sag ...


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Typically in cases like this you'll have cantilevered trusses in the roof system with an interior bearing point. The posts are entirely decorative (and hold the railing system). The biggest clue is the shape of the gable. It's possible that only the one by the door is carrying a load. There could be a small beam there for the high front gable, but that's not ...


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Adding a single pulley won't help much with mechanical advantage. You'd just be pulling diagonally down on a rope with the same force as it would take to lift the bag in the first place. Instead you'd want two pulleys, with the end of your rope secured to the rafters/beams. Then it goes down through a pulley attached to bag, then up to a second pulley ...


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I had inspector come and looked into this issue. He was also not sure why it was happened like that way. He suggested to replace those two studs with new 2 studs. those two studs are just a waste right now as those are not attached to the top plate, also one of the stud is pretty old. thanks


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Put the pulley above the spring, and in no way connected to the spring, or the chain. Use it only for lifting the bag, so that the bag can be unhooked and lowered to the ground. The rope should be loose, or disconnected, during the normal use of the bag.


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Nope...2x4 studs at 24” on center can support roof plus ceiling up to 10’ height. 2x6 studs at 24” on center can support one floor plus roof plus ceiling up to 10’ height without analysis. (See ICC Table R602.3(5).) Without analysis means an architect or structural engineer could provide calculations to prove that they could be further apart, support more ...


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If you have a plaster ceiling and it's in good shape, not coming away from the lath anywhere, there are some screw types and techniques that could reasonably hold weight like this. I don't recommend it but it's possible and you need to experiment to find what works well in your plaster. It varies. If you do this, also follow the advice below for the FIRST ...


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