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You are not sure if the header above the doorway or the corner to the right of the doorway is load bearing. I have added yellow highlights to each of these. Really there are only two ways to know for sure. Take off the drywall at both spots and take pictures of right above them in the attic and let us inspect. Get blueprints of the house to an engineer ...


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You have several issues: 1) new beam size, 2) adequate connections to the footings, 3) lateral loads, 4) footing size I’m am American so I don’t know anything about meters, but I’ll try. It appears you want a 2.4m opening (about 8’). You have one upper floor plus a roof system resting on this wall (header). So the kitchen side has 2.5m (7’) floor joists ...


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There is unfortunately no way of calculating this unless given blueprints of the house. Even if we did calculate it and even we overdid it, for something this big no inspector will pass it without an architect stamp. I can mention two things before you start this... given the current construction I don't think the beam will be a big deal. you will almost ...


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You cannot really tell what is load bearing or not just from pictures of finished space. Your best bet would be if there were blue prints of the original build of the house to to analyze. Walls perpendicular to joists can very well be load bearing if there are joist that span to that partition and then overlap with another that extends to the next supporting ...


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In my experience spindles such as that have never been used in load-bearing situations by legitimate builders. Doing so would create two hinge points along the wall's height, which would be plain dangerous. Given that fact, the arrangement and location of the wall, and the attic situation, I'm reasonably confident that the wall isn't structural. Should you ...


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It's difficult to see exactly how this is framed, but...The 2x framing directly below your blue line appears to be the top plate of the wall with spindles in it. That wall appears to be supporting attic/ceiling framing members. The perpendicular members (2x6?) appear to be bearing on the spindle wall, and not spanning over. That leads me to believe that ...


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Understand the constraints of the existing framing. I'd have probably kept the new vertical 2x4 you added 3.5" shorter (along with the plywood spacer you added), and made the header stick out 3.5" on that side to rest on top of that new 2x4. You'd essentially be using the existing vertical 2x4 as the king stud and your new 2x4 as the jack stud, ...


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