74

The opening you want to create has to be framed like a window as shown*. Notice the addition of a header to carry the load of the cut stud (cripple stud) to the sides, and the added jack studs which support the header. Because you're only supporting a light weight cabinet rather than a window, you probably don't need the double sill (single will do). As ...


46

I always wonder “what else is wrong” when there are so many obvious errors. You’ve noted the obvious problems, but you’ve probably missed some major items that are not so obvious: In Picture #1 you’ve noted the gap issue, but missed the “double spliced sole plate”. (Splices are to be a minimum of 4’ apart, unless at intersection of a wall.) In Picture #1 ...


35

Without looking at blueprints, all you can do is make an educated guess. Possible methods include: If it's an exterior wall it's almost always load bearing. If the joists are not continuous over the wall (they are cut short and meet on top of the wall) it is definitely load bearing. If there is a load bearing wall or beam directly above or below this wall, ...


28

It is absolutely UNSAFE! - this will damage the structural integrity of the wall! The load in a load-bearing stud wall is carried by the studs. Your options are: Surface mount the cabinet Flush mount the cabinet between studs Cut the stud and insert a beam to carry the load from the stud to the two studs either side. You will need to reinforce each side ...


25

Yes, you can remove the brace because: The wall is non-load bearing (not carrying a load) The diagonal brace is not secured in a manner to transfer any load at the top or bottom The diagonal brace is not secured to top plate The diagonal brace is not secured significantly to vertical stud...the picture cuts off a portion of the brace that crosses the stud ...


25

This is often a complex legal situation due to regulations that affect (in many parts of the world) what you can do in or near a body or stream of water even if the land next to it or around it belongs to you; not to mention the fact that you are fighting with a force that has literally shaped the planet, and it's inexorable and quite capable of undoing many ...


22

It's probably a good time to review the contract you entered with the framers. Does it allow you to withhold payment until defects are resolved? Does it stipulate how claimed defects are to be resolved? Do what the contract requires of you to ensure that you don't end up in breach too. There appears to be a pattern of careless work and failure to abide the ...


17

According to this document (PDF), accidental notches in the top flange may not need to be repaired if they meet specific criteria. To determine if a repair is required, we'd need a bit more information, including: The distance from the center of the notch to the end of the beam. The depth of the notch. The specific beam used, including beam height. If a ...


16

You need to slow down and rethink this. You are on the verge of making a couple of serious mistakes. Rather than directly answer your question, I am going to advise a plan to do this correctly. First, you should not pour concrete around wood support posts. This is a good way to invite rot and an unstable support system. The floors should be jacked up a bit ...


16

That wall is load bearing; it is helping to support the stairs and that landing. As such, it can be subjected to significant load (think two 250 lb guys, plus heavy furniture, for starters). More importantly, it is subject to lateral impulses from people and things going up and down the stairs so it should have lateral/diagonal bracing to help stop "...


16

Legal issues aside (that's not our pigeon here), a reliable way is dry mix sand bagging:- Pick a low quality concrete sans water, place it at your leisure and let the rain /moisture make it go off. It's a common civil engineering technique, and very efficient in terms of cost, effort and design experience. It also requires very little ground preparation, ...


16

Yes, that is shoddy work! Did you pay for shoddy work or did you pay for quality work? But things like this turn into squeaks, cracks, wobbles, etc. over time. So yes, if this was MY project I would get them back in to do it properly!


16

Horrible work. I don't think "I commissioned an independent review" will hold any weight with the contractor, unless the contract allowed for that. The contractor might dispute the qualifications of your reviewer. Instead, I would contact the local city planning office (who gave you the planning permission), and ask them for an inspection. If they say that ...


15

Point your home builder to page 9 of Weyerhauser's I-joist document here. See the bottom right of the page where it says "DO NOT cut or notch flange" It is typical of all I-joist manufacturers' installation documents. As Iggy pointed out, the I-Joist in question needs to be reinforced similar to a cantilever reinforcement. To fix this, the electrical ...


14

Only if you're a "professional" plumber. Cut twice as much & then measure, hey lookie there just like they did in your place. Seriously no, you're completely right the I's of I-joists are NEVER to be touched nor any holes within 3" of the top or bottom edges. "Responsible" plumbers & builders re-spec a toilet with a deeper stand-off or just pull it ...


14

Your plan is exactly right, except that you don't need such heavy-duty hardware to do the jacking/winching. Even a pair of motorcycle ratchet straps or a come-along is going to do the job, especially if you jack up the ridge board. I think it'll all move easier than you anticipate. Just make sure you have solid connections to the walls so you don't have any ...


14

As mentioned in another answer, there may be legal issues since the creek is a waterway. In the US, you would have Federal and probably state laws involved (many other countries have similar laws about waterways, even if you own the property). I would not try to fill the creek bed back in without approval, even if it is technically your property. What you ...


14

The framing above the pantry door is not load bearing. The doorway to the left of the pantry in the middle picture is load bearing. You can tell by the solid header.


13

Good question Paul, The situation with your framing is not really normal, but not uncommon for a house that age. Any time there is separation of framing members, it is a reason for concern and should be addressed. However, I would not say it is a major or alarming problem. There could be a couple of different reasons for this separation. The joists may have ...


13

I think you need to get a structural engineer out there ASAP to investigate; I would be worried too! Your city's by-law office might be able to refer you to someone who can help. It might also be worth getting in contact with your insurance company - they might have their own engineer come out. If you think it's really about to fall over you might opt to ...


13

Good on you for leveling up your knowledge and learning where not to drill or saw on joists. On that same note, here's an excellent summary from BuildingAdvisor titled Guide to Notching and Boring Joists: Don’t make any holes with a diameter greater than 1/3 the depth of a joist. No holes closer than 2 inches to the top or bottom edge. No holes closer than ...


12

The pergola is much like a stick framed house--the framing itself resists vertical forces (gravity) but in and of itself, has no resistance to shear forces (side to side). For a house to stand up on its own, the sides need to be braced against shear forces...typically that's done with plywood sheathing. Barring that, diagonal bracing can be used. On the ...


12

Can I safely remove one stud from a load bearing wall? Yes, but you need to properly support the gap with a header. If you aren't willing to do this then don't remove the stud, period. Will this damage the integrity of the bearing wall? Without a header you are technically compromising the integrity of whatever the wall is holding up. At best the floor ...


11

Nails are used in almost all framing and structural applications. Most code books are designed with nails in mind and will have specific minimum nailing requirements and patterns for different applications. Structural screws are coming more and more on the market every day, but because most code books don't include them you will need an engineer's approval ...


10

The post looks reasonably adequate as it was originally built even by modern standards. If it wasn't you'd have seen disaster long ago, when it first started to decay. To maintain the style detail I'd rebuild to match, using pressure-treated lumber. By doing so you eliminate the need to cut that notch and you end up with a more robust post. A single post ...


10

Structural engineer and former carpenter and contractor here. Check your plan general notes for your code and other criteria to which your contractor's quality of work must meet. Discuss with your building official, or a local structural engineer for advice and direction. From what I see in your pictures after a very quick precursory review, it appears ...


9

You need an engineer's advice on what the load is and what is required to support it. And no, you really can't make a mixed materials i-beam.


9

Yes, and I'd question your town inspector as to whether or not that would pass. You're looking at loads of problems down the way. Birdsmouth cuts are a PITA but after you do them a few hundred times they're easier. No excuse. And every single one of those 2x4s that aren't framed solid are going to move in time, causing cracks, settling, squeaks, and ...


8

I think they're there for stabilizing the brown beams/joists. Typically, a loft is unused space with no floor. Between the joists, there is insulation supported by drywall or other material depending on the age of the house (as in pic 2 and 3). Typically one would put in blocking between joists to stop horizontal flexing and torsion. Since an attic is ...


8

Been there , done that; my creek ( Plum Creek, Highland IN) was 30ft. width and embankment was 40 ft. high. I "coated" it with railroad ties, bricks, and many cuttings of trees and bushes. To reach my height I used 3 tiers of RR ties with slopes between. It required a lot of stuff and work. Yours looks much more manageable. Look for affordable rip-rap ;aka ...


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