74

The opening you want to create has to be framed like a window as shown*. Notice the addition of a header to carry the load of the cut stud (cripple stud) to the sides, and the added jack studs which support the header. Because you're only supporting a light weight cabinet rather than a window, you probably don't need the double sill (single will do). As ...


48

I always wonder “what else is wrong” when there are so many obvious errors. You’ve noted the obvious problems, but you’ve probably missed some major items that are not so obvious: In Picture #1 you’ve noted the gap issue, but missed the “double spliced sole plate”. (Splices are to be a minimum of 4’ apart, unless at intersection of a wall.) In Picture #1 ...


36

Without looking at blueprints, all you can do is make an educated guess. Possible methods include: If it's an exterior wall it's almost always load bearing. If the joists are not continuous over the wall (they are cut short and meet on top of the wall) it is definitely load bearing. If there is a load bearing wall or beam directly above or below this wall, ...


36

This gives all the impression that is was designed and installed to support the basement wall that the "arrow" of the diagonal bracing points to. The vertical post against that wall is what was put there to support that wall. The bottom of that post is most certainly held up against the wall securely by the bottom plate in that wall which is likely ...


28

It is absolutely UNSAFE! - this will damage the structural integrity of the wall! The load in a load-bearing stud wall is carried by the studs. Your options are: Surface mount the cabinet Flush mount the cabinet between studs Cut the stud and insert a beam to carry the load from the stud to the two studs either side. You will need to reinforce each side ...


27

First that post is not carrying the load of the whole house. The beam is and the beam is attached on both sides. The post's job is to keep the beam from sagging and act as a point load. I would not leave it like that for sure - and in my area there is no way in the world it would meet local code. Always have to be secured on both ends by at least two ...


25

Yes, you can remove the brace because: The wall is non-load bearing (not carrying a load) The diagonal brace is not secured in a manner to transfer any load at the top or bottom The diagonal brace is not secured to top plate The diagonal brace is not secured significantly to vertical stud...the picture cuts off a portion of the brace that crosses the stud ...


25

This is often a complex legal situation due to regulations that affect (in many parts of the world) what you can do in or near a body or stream of water even if the land next to it or around it belongs to you; not to mention the fact that you are fighting with a force that has literally shaped the planet, and it's inexorable and quite capable of undoing many ...


23

It's probably a good time to review the contract you entered with the framers. Does it allow you to withhold payment until defects are resolved? Does it stipulate how claimed defects are to be resolved? Do what the contract requires of you to ensure that you don't end up in breach too. There appears to be a pattern of careless work and failure to abide the ...


18

That joist is carrying something, even if it the weight of the material that make up that part of the house. I would say it is more than that since the new 2X with the framing anchor is attached to it, is telling me it is passing the load from the new 2X onto the one you wish to drill. Now onto drilling dimensional lumber. Code only allows you to drill a ...


17

According to this document (PDF), accidental notches in the top flange may not need to be repaired if they meet specific criteria. To determine if a repair is required, we'd need a bit more information, including: The distance from the center of the notch to the end of the beam. The depth of the notch. The specific beam used, including beam height. If a ...


16

You need to slow down and rethink this. You are on the verge of making a couple of serious mistakes. Rather than directly answer your question, I am going to advise a plan to do this correctly. First, you should not pour concrete around wood support posts. This is a good way to invite rot and an unstable support system. The floors should be jacked up a bit ...


16

That wall is load bearing; it is helping to support the stairs and that landing. As such, it can be subjected to significant load (think two 250 lb guys, plus heavy furniture, for starters). More importantly, it is subject to lateral impulses from people and things going up and down the stairs so it should have lateral/diagonal bracing to help stop "...


16

Legal issues aside (that's not our pigeon here), a reliable way is dry mix sand bagging:- Pick a low quality concrete sans water, place it at your leisure and let the rain /moisture make it go off. It's a common civil engineering technique, and very efficient in terms of cost, effort and design experience. It also requires very little ground preparation, ...


16

Yes, that is shoddy work! Did you pay for shoddy work or did you pay for quality work? But things like this turn into squeaks, cracks, wobbles, etc. over time. So yes, if this was MY project I would get them back in to do it properly!


16

Horrible work. I don't think "I commissioned an independent review" will hold any weight with the contractor, unless the contract allowed for that. The contractor might dispute the qualifications of your reviewer. Instead, I would contact the local city planning office (who gave you the planning permission), and ask them for an inspection. If they say that ...


15

Point your home builder to page 9 of Weyerhauser's I-joist document here. See the bottom right of the page where it says "DO NOT cut or notch flange" It is typical of all I-joist manufacturers' installation documents. As Iggy pointed out, the I-Joist in question needs to be reinforced similar to a cantilever reinforcement. To fix this, the electrical ...


15

Your plan is exactly right, except that you don't need such heavy-duty hardware to do the jacking/winching. Even a pair of motorcycle ratchet straps or a come-along is going to do the job, especially if you jack up the ridge board. I think it'll all move easier than you anticipate. Just make sure you have solid connections to the walls so you don't have any ...


15

In a non-load bearing wall the studs are really just nailing edges for the drywall. You could just scab pieces to the side of the 8' to make 9' studs. So take the 8' get a 1' piece and then get a piece that is 16" and use it to join the 1' and 8' together, 8" on either side of the splice.


14

Only if you're a "professional" plumber. Cut twice as much & then measure, hey lookie there just like they did in your place. Seriously no, you're completely right the I's of I-joists are NEVER to be touched nor any holes within 3" of the top or bottom edges. "Responsible" plumbers & builders re-spec a toilet with a deeper ...


14

As mentioned in another answer, there may be legal issues since the creek is a waterway. In the US, you would have Federal and probably state laws involved (many other countries have similar laws about waterways, even if you own the property). I would not try to fill the creek bed back in without approval, even if it is technically your property. What you ...


14

The framing above the pantry door is not load bearing. The doorway to the left of the pantry in the middle picture is load bearing. You can tell by the solid header.


14

As J comments, this is not a joist, it is a beam on which the joists are hung. Likely there used to be a load-bearing wall there that a prior owner had removed to enlarge the space. They could have opted to have the beam under the joists, which would have allowed space above it but would have reduced ceiling height. Instead they opted (surely at higher cost) ...


13

Can I safely remove one stud from a load bearing wall? Yes, but you need to properly support the gap with a header. If you aren't willing to do this then don't remove the stud, period. Will this damage the integrity of the bearing wall? Without a header you are technically compromising the integrity of whatever the wall is holding up. At best the floor ...


13

Good on you for leveling up your knowledge and learning where not to drill or saw on joists. On that same note, here's an excellent summary from BuildingAdvisor titled Guide to Notching and Boring Joists: Don’t make any holes with a diameter greater than 1/3 the depth of a joist. No holes closer than 2 inches to the top or bottom edge. No holes closer than ...


13

I would honestly bite the bullet and get longer studs. Even if the walls aren't structural (which I assume they are not, as it's a basement finishing), you're introducing a lot of extra work (you're basically building the wall structure twice, with the second "wall" being made out of cut to length studs - an extra step for each stud). Also, it ...


11

What makes the commercial product better than just purchasing steel plates and bolts? The commercial product doesn't rely on the screws in wood to connect the two sides. A sideways force would be spread over the area of the bracket, compressing a wide area of wood. With the plates, the same force would lever the screws out of the wood.


11

Clues that it is likely load bearing are the sheer size (two side by side planks, you don't do that without a reason) and the fact that it looks like it's supporting the studs. What is the span between walls if you follow its length? I don't think you can safely put a hole in that without reinforcing it, and you'd need an engineer to tell you how much ...


11

At least in the area where I live, that type of support post is used when a house is modified (wall was removed, to prop up a sagging beam, etc). If the house was designed to have a support post there, the post would either be the same type of wood as the rest of the frame or would be a solid (not adjustable) metal post. The lack of screws/bolts on either ...


10

The post looks reasonably adequate as it was originally built even by modern standards. If it wasn't you'd have seen disaster long ago, when it first started to decay. To maintain the style detail I'd rebuild to match, using pressure-treated lumber. By doing so you eliminate the need to cut that notch and you end up with a more robust post. A single post ...


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