Hot answers tagged

26

There should be no problem assuming that you leave adequate clearance around the unit. Any appliance becomes a fire risk if there's flammable junk piled against it. Also be diligent about vacuuming up lint and dust. The microwave's cooling fan will draw in more debris in a clothes closet than it probably would in a kitchen. You might blow it out ...


23

Those 2x4's are almost certainly the remnants of a previous shelf support and are certainly not structural elements. You can safely remove them.


5

That is a very shallow space. I think you'd need at least a couple of inches for your doors / front wall, so you're looking at less than 8" deep for the final closet. You might be better off just installing built-in shelving and/or hooks on that part of the wall to serve as storage space. You could make the shelves 8" deep and then put a sheer curtain over ...


5

Since you want to have the drywall piece be 5" high I think you will want to have backer behind it for its full height. Consider making it 5.5" high and then using a piece of 2x6 lumber (that comes 5.5 inches wide) as the backer piece. Cut a couple of pieces to straddle across the bottom of this opening at the back and middle to hold up the shelf the full ...


5

It's called a structured media enclosure and it does actually look decent. Granted, it's only half-assembled -- the second half of the project is the part that costs $$. If you wanted to hire a pro you'd be looking for an audio-video integrator - somebody that does home theaters and home automation systems. A contractor who does network cabling in commercial ...


4

You don't. Either stop the baseboard at the corner and live with the gap, or frame the opening with baseboard or molding and overhang the edge. Notice how in this picture you can't see the metal track at the top, and you also can't see the gap between the outer left/right edges of the doors and the wall. That's because the molding overhangs the wall by 1/4 ...


4

The standard is 67" up to the top of a 1X4 ledger and 12" from drywall for single hanging. the centerline of the closet pole cup is typically is 2" from the top of the ledger, it can be lower, then the ledger needs to be wider to accommodate. That puts the shelf at 67 3/4" to the top. The 11 1/4" shelf will give the room needed to get the hanger on. This is ...


4

As far as I know, there is no "standard" for this. I've looked for them. The only standards have to do with the actual closet dimensions that are specified in building codes. A common convention is 12" from the back wall to the center of the rod. People typically put the closet rods in the middle of the closet. Minimum closet depth is 24" so that puts the ...


4

You want the doors to overlap a bit. You also want the two doors to be the same width so when they are slid all the way to one side or the other that they are even. A one inch overlap is about ideal so for a 48" finished opening each door would be 24.5 inches wide. Two 24" doors would not overlap at all and would not stay fully engaged into the center ...


4

Besides having chosen possibly the most hostile environment to run a laptop, you have an advantage in using a laptop...it probably has a wall wart transformer and some lower voltage lead that actually goes to the laptop. Since this is low voltage wiring it is much easier to run and not (usually) restricted by code. So, the right thing to do, if you insist ...


4

One simple thing to try that would not be too much work would be to re-mount the plastic bracket in nearly the same place on the center divider panel as before. Instead of the short screws use some bolts like these: Select the bolt diameter that will work with the mounting holes in the bracket. Select bolt length sufficient to protrude through the bracket ...


3

I agree with Tester101's comment. The current "header" in each closet opening appears to be just one flat 2x4. You will want to install a pair of 2xX framing members on edge that can span the total new opening width without sagging. The ends of this should sit on top of the jack studs at the sides of the opening. A convenient way to make this header ...


3

All dryers need a vent. Gas and electric dryers need a vent to the outside of the house to allow all the moisture to escape from the dryer. All-in-one washer/dryer combo units don't need an air vent, but need a water drain to remove the water from the drying stage (which you need anyways to drain the wash cycle). The walls are irrelevant. So don't worry ...


3

This is a thread-cam locking shelf support. You can undo it by turning the screw a quarter turn counter clockwise, then lifting up on the shelf.


3

It depends on what you plan on storing there. I have lots of closets that have no air movement and they are just fine. I wouldn't worry about it.


3

Grab them with a locking plier and bend them back and forth a few times. They'll fatigue and snap off. Or use a rotary tool with a cutoff wheel. Then use a nail set to drive them below flush.


3

Not a bad idea what so ever. However, let me clarify on the posted answer... A hole saw can be used to cut clean perfect holes, but are limited in cut depth. You'll most likely need to use the hole saw on both sides of the jamb. A hole hog, as another commenter mentioned, is also known as an auger bit. It has a pointed threaded tip that will pull the bit ...


3

Use a long straight edge (4-6' long, depending on the height of the cabinet) on the door (maybe use the level you used to ensure that the cabinet itself was vertical) to ensure that the door itself is flat and not warped. Though they seem to take pretty good care of these in shipping, things happen. If you're certain the door is flat, use an accurate ruler ...


3

It could be a number of things. For search terms try Tie rack, Belt rack, Towel bar, belt organizing bar. You could make one out of pipe or a wood dowel. There are no rules for your closet, come up with something that works best for you. It could be as simple as a piece of wood with some hooks screwed into it. (have the home center cut the wood to length, ...


3

My standard procedure: Put a big piece of plywood on the wall - in this case, the wall shared between the closet and the attic. Make sure you get screws through the plywood into two studs. Mount patch panel(s) on the plywood. Feel free to mount other small things, as appropriate, directly on the plywood. Bring all your cables around one side (top, bottom, ...


3

In my experience with a small inexpensive patch panel (something like this: https://www.amazon.com/Dshot-network-Mount-Surface-Patch/dp/B00NUXCHE6/), there wasn't really space to bring the cables into it from "behind" where it's mounted on the wall. It's somewhat flexible, but it seems designed to have a bundle of cables enter from one or both ends....


3

Some ideas. Who says they need to overlap 3 to 4 inches? The nice thing with less overlap is better opening. Think about bifold doors, they don't overlap at all where they meet. So if sliding doors overlap by whatever you want, who says that's bad? Sugggestion: Buy two 32 inch doors and try different things til you like it. Try 1/4 inch overlap. If it ...


2

10 inches (254 mm) to the center of the rod, minimum. The widest hangers I know about are 18.5", so half of that is 9.25" plus 3/4" wiggle room. Though some hanger rod brackets are ~12" (304.8 mm) to the center of the rod.


2

Half a hanger + the thickness of the clothes would be your minimum, but the vast majority are 12"/300mm, and most but possibly not all brackets are that size.


2

Two inches is an odd size for framing material. It might be a 2x4 set flat, which is actually 1 1/5 inches thick. It is highly likely that this framing member is attached to the cinderblock at several points. If this is so, there is no issue with just attaching to the framing. If the framing is not attached to the cinderblock, it would be significantly ...


2

Why not build your closet wall along the dotted line, but end it at the inset near the window. Build a short return wall to the edge of the inset. Then on the short wall to the left of the window, build in a bookshelf ceiling to floor that is slightly less deep than the closet wall (inset about 2-3") and just short of the window trim. You could also build ...


2

Here's another idea. Hang it from the ceiling with chain. You can then use both the top and bottom bar to hang clothes. You'll need a couple of heavy hooks to screw into the ceiling joist, some attractive chain, and a clasp to connect the chain over the pipe. You can find all of this at Lowes, Home Depot, or a hardware store. Tell them what you're doing and ...


2

If you want to "get rid of the shiny look" why would apply lacquer at all? Shiny is what lacquer does. If the only issue you have with the lacquer is that it's shiny, all you may need to do is rub the doors down with steel wool or Scotchbrite® (generically, non-woven abrasive pads) to take the shine off. But don't apply more lacquer if you don't want it to ...


2

How easy this project is, will depend on the underlying framing. There's two ways these corners could have been framed. Side walls to the end This will make what you want to do fairly easy. Top down view of the framing End walls to the side This is the more likely of the two. Which means you'll either have to build out the corner, or lose 3 1/2" (+...


2

I did this once when I lived in an apartment and could not modify anything. Since I had metal working and welding experience, I created a steel frame using 1 inch angle steel. Basically, it was a 'table' that stood inside the closet and it's dimensions where precisely the inside dimensions of the closet; ie; the legs were flush against the walls of the ...


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