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31

The nail heads aren't big enough for the holes. At that time carpenters didn't enjoy the vast array of fasteners and installation tools that we do today, so they may have used what was available at the moment. It did the job, right? ~ or ~ The carpenter had intended to replace them with lag screws and forgot. ~ or ~ There's something sensitive to ...


25

No, it’s not acceptable to cut the joist hangers. In order to determine if they are acceptable anyway, there are several issues to review: 1) hangers are notched, 2) incomplete nailing, 3) wrong nails, 4) wrong install of fasteners (angled install in lieu of perpendicular to joist installation). 1) Notching the hangers voids the allowable stresses ...


17

This is fine. It's a wooden open web truss system. The weight is transferred to the column at the one top point. The lower bar and diagonal bracing are to prevent the top bar from sagging over a wide span. The lower bar extends all the way to the wall so there is something for the ceiling drywall to screw into, but isn't supposed to rest on the column....


12

It has to do more with the quality of the the 2x6s vs the 4x6. A 4x6 x 12 board would have to be clear all the way through, with no cracks or knots. Most softwood logs won't produce this board, and if it cracks, it is likely to break more easily vs the 2x6. On the other hand, drilling a bunch of holes in a 2x6 does it no favors, though because the two ...


12

Cutting a hanger is never a good idea and should never be accepted. It's shoddy workmanship by the contractor and there were numerous solutions that could have avoided this (starting with properly measuring the bolt locations for the web blocking). However, the main issue is that these hangers are not designed for this application. They are meant to hang ...


10

If you really have an 8"x10" beam in your basement it is probably supporting a huge amount of weight. Please do not even consider cutting into it without getting an engineer to determine what kind of supporting columns are required. (Cutting away 50% of the depth will reduce the strength by 75%.) I am guessing that in addition to the columns you will need to ...


9

This is not meant to be an authoritative answer, but I have worked in many homes and buildings of similar age and you almost always see some cracks in the beams, they are usually there for decades, in fact they probably occur when wood is new and drying out for the first time. Still it can't hurt to have someone take a look at it. You could take some ...


9

You need an engineer's advice on what the load is and what is required to support it. And no, you really can't make a mixed materials i-beam.


9

You never cut hangers unless they are made for cutting. Call in a inspector who will advise you or the engineer who done the design but don't under any circumstances let this go without it being checked. As further down the line could cost you a lot of money.


8

Because it is easy to remove the nails if required to move the post. The nails mostly hold the post in position until the overall weight of the building bears down a lot of pressure on the post. At that point it is mostly friction between the upper post plate and the beam that holds the post in position.


8

Nah - most of the strength is in shear, and joist hanger nails are nice and fat so they have good shear strength. also, yanking them is likely to be harder than you think. The actual nailing schedule seems to be here: http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/H.asp That suggests that 10d are one size larger than you should use in a model H1Z hanger (...


8

When modifying load bearing walls and betting your house on the results, you are well served to hire a civil engineer to analyze the situation and tell you what will work, rather than guessing. It should not be terribly expensive.


7

Boards that are laminated in some fashion get an overall durability increase (not necessarily net strength increase) because they no longer suffer from a single grain dimension through the thickness. Primarily, in the case you describe a split or warp will not impact the whole board, only half of it. A properly laminated beam (like VersaLam or Glulam) does ...


7

The Scout Pioneering website contains information on how to build several bridges. I am guessing that most of these are more complicated than what you had in mind, so if you want something simpler, you can attempt flat span bridge using 2x12's for a span between 14 and 18 feet. On the latter page the author goes on to say that "[i]f you are thinking of ...


7

Possibly, but you should consult a structural engineer. For the cost of less than a day's work for an engineer you will get an answer that you can rely on. I know, it's unfortunate that you'd have to pay for this, but if you've invested hundreds of thousands of dollars into this house, or value your life it's probably money well spent. The short answer, ...


6

mortar is not really structural, I would go with steel, perhaps half-inch plate and some washers


5

If you put a beam across the room you'll feel bad every time you look at it. if you have a flat ceiling, you'll feel proud. Use joist hangers to put some 2x4s between the ceiling joists so that they pass just above the 2x6 (stuff's going to sag), drill through the top plate from below with a spade bit and screw the 2x6 to the 2x4s remove the wall and top ...


5

There are lots of ways to attach beams to posts, and you don't necessarily need purpose-built brackets. Miter your beams so that they come together at an appropriate bisection of the post top, and use whatever means is convenient to keep them positioned... dowels, angled screws, etc. In the case shown in the second image, I'd be inclined to use a skewed ...


5

Very unlikely. The floor concrete may be anywhere from 1/4 inch to 4+ inches thick . The existing posts should be on footings ; depending where you are, like 18" deep. I tiled a basement in Joilet IL and found a hole where the concrete had been 1/4".


5

I think it is time to call a structural engineer before you take out any more studs. Once the mistake is made and you take out too many, it may too late to correct the problem or very costly to fix. If it is a load bearing wall, taking out even one without supporting the load above, could be a costly mistake.


5

I'm familiar with that double shear hanger. Nails should be 10d 3" for the cross nailing and 10d 3" or 10d 1-1/2" depending on single or double 2 x material rim joist/header. However it's the wrong hanger for the application. It might have been ok if the rim/beam/header was constructed differently. And never modify a framing hanger other than bending those ...


5

We’ve learned a lot about construction in the last 115 years since your house was built. We use to just worry about holding everything “up”. Now we design for vertical loads and horizontal loads (seismic and wind loads). We also worry about the performance of the structural systems over time...including shrinkage of materials. Your beam (and gap between ...


4

If I'm reading this right(and looking at the final picture), the beam itself is sagging. It may have reached an equilibrium point, and simply jacking up an reattaching it will fix it. But you'll still have a bowed beam. My inclination is, a properly built beam should be able to span that distance and hold the weight without sagging. I have smaller, longer ...


4

My house has encountered a very similar issue with joists splitting in the basement. I was told by two contractors that its been like that and not fallen down so no need to worry.. I don't accept that as an answer. I (as an engineer) called in an engineer who specialized in residential construction and inspection. The engineer I brought in had a ...


4

The right way to fix this is to have a local engineer size a LVL (laminated veneer lumber) beam for you (solid wood lumber won't meet modern standards for a span that long). It'll likely be taller than your current beam. You'll need to temporarily support all the rafters with a framed wall on each side, using double top plates. Keep them a few feet away from ...


4

What Nate said in his answer is true, but need to go a bit further on this question. There are several charts available that specify beam sizes based on span, spacing and types of materials used. A beam 20 foot long would be difficult to create with dimensional lumber, but not impossible. You will be more likely to find that a LAM or steel beam will be ...


4

cut the head off of two bolts or nails that fit snugly into the holes, and extend out from the drywall some amount - may 1/4". Line up the board over these pegs, and hit the surface of the board with a mallet over each peg. This will make an indent on the back surface that you can drill. Be careful that your first hit doesn't mess up your alignment for ...


4

With a helper, pull a builder's line (dryline) from one end to the other along a bottom corner of the beam. Find a good compromise that's just outside all the curves and humps. Fasten the line to the walls at each end and make sure it's very tight. Check that you can plumb up from the line at all points along the beam without encroaching on the beam. If not,...


4

Just a heads up, spanning 22' while being limited to 4-6" floor depth is extremely cost prohibitive. Deeper is always cheaper, but it sounds like you don't have the space to make this work as planned. What's below this storage space you want to create? Can you legally reduce the head height by framing the floor lower? This would allow for more storage space ...


4

I think the joists cut short are fine because, 1) required bearing is satisfactory, 2) withdrawal out of hanger is not of concern. 1) Your 2x10’s at 16” on center spanning 12’ will support a maximum of between 100 per linear foot (plf) and 155 plf depending on the species and grade of the lumber. Therefore, the maximum load on each hanger is: 155 plf x 6’...


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