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35

The difference appears to be about 1/4" to 3/8". If so, I'd fur it out with some 1/4" plywood strips or some 3/8" lath strips.


35

No. Wood frame construction is generally done for rigidity not strength. You can climb a tree and have the branches deflect significantly before they break - the strength is fine - if you build a house with just strength in mind then you'd be bouncing all over the place. Wood frame construction is instead designed for rigidity such that when you walk ...


30

Absolutely no problem. The screws (actually called "lag bolts") bite into the wood immediately around them, and the wood fibers around that hold the bolt in place. Yes the holes you made already weaken the fibers immediately around them but the amount is insignificant. And, for a flat screen TV like you're describing, the weight you'll be putting on ...


28

As long as they are normal screws and you unscrew them they won't compromise the studs or their integrity. If you rip the screws out (with a hammer for example) that could compromise the studs. If you plan on reusing the exact same holes there are things you can do to help future screws grip just as well by adding toothpicks to the holes, but otherwise you ...


27

If the TV will be on a pivot arm the answer is absolutely not. If it will be tight to the wall, as you say, and generally nobody will be physically handling the TV (tilting or moving, e.g. to plug in game consoles or whatever) then it can be quite safe especially if you use several (4?) toggle bolts along the top edge of the bracket. You don't need them on ...


23

Those are called "finger jointed studs". These joints are weaker than regular 2x4 or 2x6. I do a lot of woodworking and when gluing boards together (for like a table top) the glue joints are actually stronger than the wood itself. But for some reason, that's not the case with finger jointed studs, they are just much weaker than the intact 2x. ...


22

Another thought you may not have considered - theres a door there that opens toward the shelf. Please fit a permanent floor-mounted doorstop so it can never ever swing open and hit the shelf. The impact could drop your aquarium and thats no fun for the fish or for whoever has to clean up all the water afterward.


22

I think your husband just wants the shoe bins to remain where they are and doesn't want to buy new ones.. LOL. Removing the screws will not damage the studs even if they were load bearing. Patch the holes with a vinyl spackle, sand lightly and you're good to go.


21

Those brackets are barely adequate for your purpose. They may flex and even collapse under that load. At best you'll probably have a sloping shelf. You need heavy brackets with diagonal bracing, along the lines of closet shelf brackets. I usually use what are commonly known as max brackets, however. They're made with eighth-inch steel and are designed to ...


21

Looks like a standard install. You can only run so many wires in a hole without de-rating the circuit capacity. The holes are set back at least 3/4" from the stud surface, add 1/2" for drywall and you get 1 1/4" the length of the drywall screws. Even if the drywall screw goes into the same line as the hole it isn't long enough to penetrate the wire. If ...


20

There's a few things in here so let's cover them one at a time Can I support a TV mount with only drywall? If we're talking a modern TV (i.e. a 2015+ 4k TV) then yes. I recently had my living room TV die and I bought a 65" 4k TV. It weighs perhaps 50 lbs, which is well within the tolerances of drywall using a flush-mount. I would buy either the best ...


19

Mount a board on the wall and then mount the screen on the board. Get an 8 foot cedar or pressure treated 2x6, you can then use timber screws to mount it to the wall insuring you hit the studs. You will need to pre-drill both the 2x6 and the cement siding, the hole in the siding should be as big as the screw and the hole in the board should be just smaller ...


18

Yes. They can be however far apart the builder wants them. I have used 3-4 studs within 16" when doing bathrooms, high traffic corner, in bathrooms for showers... and have installed an extra stud because of a previous mistake. I only use magnetic stud finder (finds your screws). If you use a method and you just aren't 100% sure the best thing to do ...


15

You are looking at tree sap. It's harmless. It's dried out so if it's gonna cause you to lose sleep at night, just scrape it off with a chisel.


14

There is a ton of information and history out there. Studs are strong pieces that are the internal structure of your walls. They are covered by some type of material (the "skin") that is what you see when you look at a wall. If you imagine your wall without any type of skin material, there are probably two studs at the left and right edges and definitely ...


14

My take is in the middle between isherwood's and Machavity's. The brackets you reference may be rated for the load, but my experience with them is that they can flex and sag under a load, so the shelf might tilt. A braced bracket, like isherwood suggests is appropriate for this. You could even use something a little more decorative as long as it's rated ...


14

Studs are cut to length at the mill so you can build your 8’ walls without cutting the ends off the top and bottom plates with studs make a quick tilt up wall, the rest is true 8’ 10’ 12’ . Note if remodeling verify length prior to building a wall.


14

OK, the yellow anchors do not go into the studs. They can be used in drywall, brick, masonry, etc when the proper size hole is drilled. Those big threaded anchors are for drywall. They have a sharp point and you screw them into the wall with a Phillips screwdriver and tighten them up so they indent a little into the drywall. Then one of your smaller silver ...


14

Metal studs? Welcome to the world of the "self-drilling sheet metal screw" Image from "Albanycountyfasteners.com" never heard of them, not associated in any way. You don't need ones with a rubber washer, but this was the first image that wasn't impossible to copy - you can get them with various head types to match your wall mount ...


13

Trying to mount an articulating arm that is designed to mount to a single stud will not stand up mounted to that type of wall construction. Even with long lag bolts there is just too much chance that mount will move around and cut into the drywall, become loose and make a mess of things. What you should be doing is to mount a panel of good quality 3/4" ...


12

The common solution is to attach a piece of plywood larger than the panel to the studs, and then attach the panel to the plywood. This also provides a good place for attaching cables, so you can get a nice organized installation. Additionally, this technique provides the benefit of being able to insulate behind the panel.


12

It's going to be more secure to use the studs, but depending on the weight of what you're hanging, it may not be necessary. If you're hanging more than 40+ pounds, I'd go ahead and use the studs. Instead of using wood screws or lag bolts as you would use in wood studs, use toggle bolts similar to the Toggler brand that you mentioned. Starting from the ...


11

The only case of having to replace studs and such I’m aware of is from termite/dry rot damage. A number of years ago, my 2-story California home was to be painted. Before starting, the contractor went to repair some siding panels were edges were coming lose. He peeked behind one and went “oh, crap”. He had found severe termite damage. A bunch of studs has ...


10

There are at least 3 standard spacings, all based on an 8 foot (96" unit) 16", 6 studs per 96" (usually in red on a tape measure) 19.2", 5 studs per 96" (and there is usually a little diamond symbol on tape measures for this spacing) 24", 4 studs per 96" (most tape measure makers think you can handle this one without additional help) Due to door (frames), ...


10

Now that I see your photo I'd do this differently. I'd install a vertical cleat just behind the faceframe on each side of the cabinet, maybe 1" back (the thickness of the plate plus 1/4"). I'd then span a sheet of 3/4" plywood across them, creating a solid face on which to install your mount. You should have either a cabinet wall or framing to screw into. ...


10

A bunch of ways to do this. What I would probably do myself, which is not what you are currently planning, is: Cut a piece of plywood, probably 3/4" thick, 24" tall by ~ 20" (studs 16" apart) or ~ 28" (studs 24" apart). Mount the plywood with 3 screws on each stud. Paint the plywood to match the wall. It doesn't have to be perfect because it will be mostly ...


9

Wood screws directly into a stud are going to be many times stronger then drywall anchors. When you have hit a stud, use a screw. When you are just in the drywall, use a drywall anchor. Drilling out the strong wood to replace with weak plastic doesn't make any sense. If you really wanted to just use anchors, they make metal anchors that can be driven ...


9

In countries with high labor costs, people build structures out of wood, not concrete or bricks or earth, as wood is faster to build with, thus minimizing those high labor costs. In such buildings, the wood is the structural core that frames the walls, floors, ceilings, and roof, and there are various terms for the different pieces of wood depending on where ...


9

Consider a box instead of a shelf. This is quite natural for an aquarium/vivarium: Various maintenance (food, cleaning, testing) materials have a natural place there. Possibly a few books on fishes. Or some of your machinery can be neatly worked into this (timers, specifically). The simple idea is that the "vertical" bits are rectangles and resist ...


9

Assuming that the screws don't feel loose when you remove them due to inadequate length or pilot holes that are too large, you can reuse the holes. I've done just that a thousand times with everything from knickknack shelves to solid wood doors. The point of concern usually isn't the holes, but the screws. If they were barely adequate before, they'll be ...


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