16

With these types of tiles you do not want them to break as they are harder to demo when they are in bits and shards. If you try to use a scraper (even power) what inevitably ends up happening is the top of the tile comes off, leaving the much harder to remove bottom on. Also this method severely damages the subfloor, sometimes to the point that you will ...


16

I can comment, from tons of experience, that trying to secure the plastic with blue painters tape is highly likely to lead to a great disappointment in performance. Taping up even the thinnest plastic sheeting is so easily torn down by any pulls and tugs on the plastic. Heavier plastic is even worse. My recommendation, if you have to use tape, is to use ...


9

You didn't mention how tall the chimney is. 2 story house or single. Is there or was there ever a displacement for a fireplace, one flue or two? Lined or bare brick interior? In general, the procedure is brick by brick. A small mini jack/impact hammer will speed up the process, but it can be done with a hammer and cold chisel. Most chimneys are ...


8

OH, looks like fun! Love to demo small buildings. Basic tools will be great. Large rip claw hammers, pry bars, a good 4 foot demo bar, a circular saw, and MOST IMPORTANT tool would be a good reciprocating saw with long bi-metal demo blades. Be careful, start at the top, remove the roof panels. cut off the rafters one at a time. then either cut and knock ...


8

Tile is generally installed as a permanent fixture. Removal is intended to be difficult - in fact easy removal is a clear indicator that the installation wasn't done well. The sub-material is often destroyed in the removal process because of the force necessary for removal of the product. DITRA, being textured, would hold onto the mortar used to mount the ...


8

This floor has been floated, a very common and traditional method for preparing surfaces for tile. To "float" is to apply a cement and sand mix similar to concrete but without rocks, gravel or coarse sand. A 2" thick float is not uncommon at all. It is often applied using a "dry pack" method wherein only enough water is mixed to ensure proper set but wet ...


8

For the wall to be structurally important, it could 1) have a post located in it, 2) be a load bearing (vertical loads), or 3) a shear wall: Posts can support roof beams or second floor beams. You’ll need to look in the attic to see if a post extends up to a beam. You’ll also need to see if there is a footing in the crawl space directly under the post......


7

If it was poured onto an already existing slab, I would try separating it from the slab first to see if it can be broken away and leave the floor intact. Note: The pad should weigh about 815 pounds (370 kg) so light duty efforts are inappropriate. Obtain two heavy steel digging bars like this along with some scrap 2x4s or similar. With heavy gloves on, ...


7

Any thickness of plastic will stop dust from going through it. The only reason to use thicker plastic as opposed to thinner is that the thicker plastic holds up a little better to punctures and tears (which can then let some dust through). If it's far enough away from your work area that you aren't worried about debris falling against it, you can go as ...


6

The only thing bearing on that wall are shampoo bottles. Knock away. The wall is empty. Note that the end of the porcelain tub is open, so something will have to go back to cover it up. When it's open you can inspect under the tub for horrors. But you'll also want to remove the wall sheathing all around that tub, and read up about flashing and backer ...


6

We removed an old brick chimney to install a modern (well, 1970's modern - stainless steel is more common these days in your better chimneys) block and tile chimney by simply hammering and removing bricks. If you do it top down it's "apparently more tedious" but actually less time overall than anything involving "knocking it down" and then clearing up the ...


6

Normal "full length" sledge is 8 lbs, normal "hand sledge" (short handle) is 4. Excess weight may have two downsides - one is more wear and tear on you the operator, and the other is that you may get lower velocity on your hits - and since energy is mass times velocity squared, a hammer weighing 12 lbs still needs to make at least 81% of the velocity of the ...


6

I know this question is old but I felt I could add some details to it. I used every thing from the one handed sledge hammer, '4 pounder', to the heavier 20 lb sledge hammer. Ecnerwal is right, for general 'household use' you'd really ever need an 8 lb. 20 lb in my experience is really only for commercial/industrial use. Having said that, and not knowing what ...


6

Step one, which I hope you are already doing - put on a pair of safety glasses. You may also want earplugs, and gloves. Use a masonry chisel (nearly parallel to the floor) to get under it and lift it up. You can also drive it into the grout joints, but if you already have a few tiles out, driving under the remaining ones from the area where some are removed ...


6

I would go ahead and open the wall from the side you are planning on replacing. Once you open the wall, you might find out that the drywall has been glued to the studs, in which case your best bet would be to make a clean cut and plan on replacing both sides. If there isn't any glue, you could proceed two ways: Use a magnet to find each screw and back ...


5

If you have plenty of time, and don't want to hire power tools, you can do it a bit at a time over several weeks (months?). It will be hard work but anyone can do it. That's a brick bolster and a club hammer, which is what I had to hand when I needed to break up some brickwork. You could try some other type of cold chisel or hammer. It depends what you can ...


5

It will probably be 3 to 6 hours of non-skilled labor (neighborhood kids?) to dig up the concrete and remove the whole assembly. Don't cut the post off: it will help wiggle out the base. Dig a hole immediately to one side of the concrete base of a convenient size. (There is no need to dig all around it.) A post hole digger works great. Make the hole at ...


5

Asbestos has been banned in Europe for over a decade you will be fine. Blue and brown asbestos was been banned since 1985 and white asbestos since 1999 (resolving and complete end by 2005) so 2008 (manufactured or sold) gypsum board could not legally have asbestos. The only danger you'd face is the possibly older insulation behind it or you end up shaking ...


5

Use (if you can fit it on) or replicate the function of a "lally column cutter" - I suspect replicate the function will be the better bet - use a cutoff disk in an angle grinder to score a line around the base of the steel (not a piddly little score, ideally - deepish, but it need not hit concrete) and then smack the top of the column. Enjoy the power of "...


5

There might also be asbestos in the plaster and contaminating the lath. Did you have the wall tested prior to demolition? (I'm guessing no) You may have to be very careful with this material and possibly apply a complex and detailed cleaning of the site to render it safe, sorry to say. Here's to hoping that it doesn't have asbestos... In USA the use of ...


4

The magic words you want are "RRP", the EPA Renovation, Repair and Painting rules. For a simple residential demolition that's all you need. For details see http://www2.epa.gov/lead/renovation-repair-and-painting-program Homeowners can take the RRP certification course (I did), but in most cases you'll want to ask the contractor for their RRP certification ...


4

I would advertise "Free Shed" on Craigslist. I had a tree house I constructed for my grand kids, and when they outgrew it that's what I did. Some folks came out one Saturday, disassembled it, and took it away. They did the whole job. I just got to watch.


4

Couple possibilities I can think of (hard to tell without looking at a floor plan): Floor was built over a larger area and then covered over. Landing or base of the stairs was moved, possibly during early construction. Floor or landing was intentionally extended to provide a shelf for storage. Joists are continuing to a load bearing structure (wall of the ...


4

Generally, house mice don't carry hantavirus. However, it sounds like your property may be semi-rural, so there might be deer mice, which may carry it. I found this Center for Disease Control PDF. Interestingly enough, it doesn't talk about respiratory protection at all. It seems that all you need to do is spray down the old nests/etc. with disinfectant ...


4

I wouldn't trust a random individual on the internet to correctly identify bearing walls. There are general guidelines for identifying bearing walls, but many exceptions to the rules. Get a competent person in your kitchen to look at the structure. From there, you can figure out the engineering.


4

Wear safety glasses and earplugs. I'm quite serious. As commented, depends what you are breaking up, and how much, and to what extent speed is a factor. A sledge will break rocks. A jackhammer will typically break rocks faster. An electric jackhammer might be the happy medium for "an enclosed environment" if there's a lot to be done, and electricity, ...


4

Absolutely doable, though it may take a while. If your goal is to end up with wood that is usable for another project, then hammer and crowbar are the right tools. If your goal is simply to remove the shed and toss everything in a Dumpster, then a cutting tool such as a Sawzall: will make the project much easier. If you plan to reuse the wood, then ...


4

IMHO - Accept the need to repair drywall on both sides, or fuggedaboutit until you are ready to face that. You could locate the screws with a strong magnet and excavate and unscrew them, but that's still going to need patching and painting. Cockamamie schemes involving cutoff disks come to mind, as does the potential for burning down the house with the ...


3

In the installation instructions for water heaters that I could find, they all say that this "parking block" is required. Installation, Operation, AND service Manual for Residential Storage Type Gas Water Heaters THIS WATER HEATER MUST BE LOCATED OR PROTECTED TO AVOID PHYSICAL DAMAGE BY VEHICLES OR FLOODING. Installation Instructions and Use &...


3

Assuming you plan to live in the house while this is going on, you should seriously look at the plastic "curtain" products which can be used to isolate the construction zone. They can tremendously reduce how much dust gets into the rest of the house. Speaking of dust, a serious dust mask (one that achieves a good seal against the face rather than the cheap "...


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