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76

The answer is surprisingly simple: the bolt expands, but the nut expands more. What is happening here is good old thermal expansion: The bolt is heated and expands outwards, its radius increasing The nut is heated and... expands outwards, its radius increasing Now, since the nut's radius is slightly greater than the bolt's, and since the increase is ...


55

Once we bought an old pallet factory, so I really got to "see how the sausage is made". Pallets are made in extremely, extremely high production because the typical corporate customer orders thousands and pays about $6 each for them. There are also an infinite number of pallet sizes and styles, though most fit a 40x48 footprint. These two requirements ...


43

I use a device called a nail jack. It will work with or without a nail head. It has a beak that you center on the nail then a slide that you smack down on and it bites the nail. After it has a grip 1 sole has a lever that you rock back on and it pulls the nail out. I have used on all sizes of nails in both hard wood and soft wood. Aged oak with nails is the ...


43

In my part of the world hiring a refuse service is standard and almost unavoidable. We had 30 cubic yard dumpsters (steel containers) on all our jobsites which were often emptied or replaced multiple times during the course of construction. Your contractor should have handled that. (If you are your contractor, now you know. :) ) They aren't cheap, so pack ...


35

The secret is constrained expansion. Here's some cruddy diagrams to help explain how it works. Bolt stuck in a hole When the bolt is heated, it expands. Since the shaft of the bolt is constrained, it can't expand inside the hole. The bolt expands in the direction of the green arrow, but cannot expand in the direction of the red arrows. As the bolt ...


28

The actual reason this usually works is that rust is significantly larger than the steel it's rusted from, which is why the bolt is stuck in the first place. In some other instances the reason heat works is that the bolt was applied with a threadlocker that requires heating to remove (if it comes out with no sign of rust, that's a pretty good bet) Many ...


22

Here are a few options, depending on how DIY-savvy or actively involved you are in your project: Rent a disposal bin They are easily found on-line, under names or keywords such as "construction disposal", and "debris bins". A "disposal bin" may be known as a "dumpster" in the US, or a "skip" in Australia. You ...


20

A kitchen sink is usually relatively large and when made of porcelain it's probably pretty heavy. The putty knife is a good idea but you're fighting against not just the silicone but also the weight of the sink. Also make sure you're not fighting against the plumbing -- the drain or the faucet supply pipes could hamper your efforts. Find a way to apply some ...


17

Your regular trash company. Order construction dumpster. First, if there was asbestos in the debris, you hire an asbestos remediation company to separate the asbestos out of the debris and haul it away. You contact typically your normal trash company, or the local major dumpster services, and order a dumpster for construction debris. That is special, and ...


16

This is a pop rivet, not a bolt. It can only be removed destructively. Drill out the center with a drill bit meant for metal (as opposed to a brad point bit, for instance) until the flange come off. Use a bit roughly half the diameter of the flange. When the flange breaks free, it will get stuck on the tip of your drill bit, which you will then remove ...


16

I'd take a different approach. I'd simply drive them in with a nail set so they effectively disappear. In cases where you need to make cuts, shift things to avoid the nail locations.


13

You can go at it with a sledgehammer (or a smaller hand sledge) and a star drill, and then drive wedges into the holes (or if you are patient, fill the holes with water and let them freeze in the winter.) There are special wedges designed for use in round holes for splitting rock (feathers and wedges seems to find them). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


13

Jack up the sink slowly. Take all of the plumbing out, get a car jack or any other type of small jack, put a piece of a 2x6/8 in between and push that thing up. Once you get a little bit of upward tension you will see the areas that are stuck and they should have a few mm showing where you can cut the caulk. My go-tos are WD 40 and goo-gone. Give those ...


12

I had these on painted wooden cabinet doors. I slid dental floss behind the plastic part which cut the plastic latch off, leaving the foam adhered to the door. Then I peeled the foam off by hand and it did no damage. I couldn't believe how easy it was! I thought it was stuck for good.


12

Metal arranged in a ring expands outward when heated. Imagine a ring of thin wire being heated--it expands primarily along its length, making both the inner and outer diameters larger. The same occurs with the material around a bolt hole. Generally, I try to heat the surrounding piece and not the bolt itself. However, even if the bolt is heated directly, ...


12

I would say no don’t use a crowbar unless you are good at repairing/ replacing brick work. I would grind the head off that or burn it off with a oxy-acetylene torch. I have put anchors up and use a torch to make it look like a rivet. In doing this it makes the bolt impossible to pull without cutting the head off. Expanding anchors are usually used so pulling ...


9

I don't agree with any of the comments. It is impractical to move it. First unless you use big equipment the chances of it breaking are solid. But lets look past moving it and say that is "easy". Where are you moving it to? The bottom is probably all over the place meaning that unless where you are moving it to has very similar ground characteristics ...


9

There exist expanding compounds like this one: Ecobust, which are poured into predrilled holes and expand as they dry, splitting the stone (or concrete). It does require a power tool, unless there are already some cracks in your boulder, but a cordless hammer drill should be sufficient.


9

I know this may not apply to every situation, but as an electrician I use a pair of side cutters and leverage it out of a hole. Lineman's pliers work too if there is enough space and you can get enough of a grip on it.


9

You might be able to use a pneumatic denailer. It punches the nails through the wood to drive them out, and seems to work from either end of the nail, so would not require the nail to have a head. It is probably an expensive investment for a one-time task, but you may be able to rent one from your local home-improvement store. Here is a video of the ...


8

Try pushing the pipe in a bit, before pulling it out. Sometimes the barbs dig into the pipe, so the release ring can't disengage them. Pushing the pipe in, may allow the release to completely disengage the barbs. Use the tool to compress the release ring. Push the tubing deeper into the fitting, while keeping pressure on the release tool. Pull the tubing ...


8

If it is a nice looking rock or has a particular shape, place it on Craig's list as a free item. I listed four 5" Blue Spruce trees I needed to remove to make way for a garage. Gone over the weekend and I didn't have to lift a hand.


8

If you want to use wood glue again, I'd remove the old glue. You'll get a stronger bond if you apply glue to clean wood. A belt sander would do a nice job. If you're ok using urethane glue or project adhesive, the only concern is whether the replaced board will sit above the others. Otherwise I'd have no problem bonding to the old glue if it appears solid. ...


7

Duplex outlets are usually installed in a daisy chained string. If you want to remove one without affecting the others, you should observe carefully what wires are attached to where before disconnecting. Make sure the breakaway tab has NOT been broken away as that would indicate a special situation: Then use a wire nut to join the black wires that were ...


7

These don't come out easily, sometimes they can be pushed back into the wall and dissappear, this is often the case if the person installing it was thinking ahead and drilled the hole deeper than needed as an end-of-life plan. Else you need to drive the shaft back in a bit to release the wedge and then pull on the sleeve part, locking pliers are useful ...


7

On this style of light fixture, you'll usually find that one of the three clips is spring loaded and can be pulled horizontally away from the center. This allows you d to remove the glass. There is no need to unscrew the clips.


7

This depends on the size of the haul. For small/DIY things, your city garbage pickup might offer a free service, just check if they handle construction debris. For medium/DIY, consider something like YellowSack. For large jobs (which sounds like what you have), look through Yelp or Nextdoor for a reputable hauling company and they will arrange for a ...


6

I have just finished renovating an outdoor furniture set. This involved removing and replacing about 180 wood screws. The things I found that worked best are: Clean around the screw head as much as possible, to free it up from anything around it. Wood screws can become embedded, and the wood covering them hardens over the years, especially if oil/varnish/...


6

The only thing bearing on that wall are shampoo bottles. Knock away. The wall is empty. Note that the end of the porcelain tub is open, so something will have to go back to cover it up. When it's open you can inspect under the tub for horrors. But you'll also want to remove the wall sheathing all around that tub, and read up about flashing and backer ...


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