Hot answers tagged

29

Why use any gravel? Fill entirely with soil.


12

It isn't a question of post size. Well, it is, but you have bigger concerns: The brackets will not serve your purpose. They're mostly designed to anchor the base of the post, and to keep it off the concrete. They don't provide nearly enough stability to keep a post standing under load. Your posts must be embedded a substantial distance into the concrete. 1:...


10

The post looks reasonably adequate as it was originally built even by modern standards. If it wasn't you'd have seen disaster long ago, when it first started to decay. To maintain the style detail I'd rebuild to match, using pressure-treated lumber. By doing so you eliminate the need to cut that notch and you end up with a more robust post. A single post ...


8

I would not recommend filling with gravel. Just think about if you ever need to dig at the same spot again, it will just be a hassle. Also gravel costs money and needs to be transported home. I would just use soil from a place in the yard that has to much.


7

I would use a punch to make a small dent in the pole so my drill bit wouldn't slip.


7

The plan will make the 4x4s look good. However, you did say they are LOAD BEARING, an epoxy is great for holding things together or protecting things, but terrible at withstanding stress from a load. The posts function is to transfer the weight above it to the ground, so filling in the rotted parts of the wood with epoxy is just hiding the problem. Most ...


7

Wrap one end of the rope around a pillar 3-4 times, tie the loose end back to the standing portion of the rope (probably with a bowline), and then slide the wraps up to the top of the pillar so that the part furthest from the knot is highest, with the rope smoothly wrapping down from that point. Do the same for the other end, tightening the rope enough to ...


6

Short answer: No. If they ring when you tap them like you did in your video, then they are solid. Sand them and paint them with a good rust inhibiting paint.


5

The punch suggested by SpectralGhost is a good idea. If that doesn't work, you can make a jig with three pieces of 2x4. Screw the pieces together and drill a pilot hole for the drill bit (the dotted line) using the same size bit you intend to use on the pipe.


5

Long (18" and longer) drill bits do exist. If the hole is wide enough, bit extensions are also usable. However, there's also a simple-but-elegant cheat. Cut the piece lengthwise, rout a channel in one or both sides, glue back together. If you make a thin-kerf cut, and are careful during reassembly, the glue line can be nearly invisible -- especially on ...


5

It may be easier to make a post out of two 2x4's where you can use a router to cut in a V groove down the center of the face of each piece. The two V grooves facing each other would make a channel down the middle of the post. You may want to consider the use of a PVC conduit in the channel to eliminate the possibility of rusting. An easier procedure than ...


5

I had this exact question regarding a 16x16 sun shade I am installing. I am planning on 8' above ground height and need 12' posts. I reviewed my project with a friend who is contractor, his response was that: a 4x4 will handle the load put 1/3 of the post in the ground (also cited in the other answer here) a 4x6 or 6x6 will look better 4x4s are more likely ...


5

+1 option #4, plastic standoffs. "Any thoughts on the most robust way to anchor the posts?" You said you are renting and can not anchor. Take some five gallon buckets and mix up some cement, fill the buckets with the cement and put an eye bolt in so it stick out of the top. Put a nut and washer on the threaded part of the eye bolt that will be in ...


5

Do not use concrete. Concrete and aluminum have incompatible issues. Dirt and compact it well, every 2" or so as you refill the hole.


5

The posts do not have to line up- structures can certainly be designed and engineered that way. Is this OK for your project ? There is no way that anyone here can make that judgement with the information you have given. There are many other structural considerations when thinking of replacing a bearing wall with a beam (load, uplift, lateral forces, etc). I ...


4

I just went through the process of removing a broken-off fence post without removing the concrete pier. Tough job! I expected it would only take a couple of hours, and that replacing just the post would be easier than digging out and breaking out the old pier, disposing of the concrete, and pouring a new pier. Maybe not, though, especially if the old post ...


4

I had the same situation at my place, I set the post and ran the top rail past it to the house and set elbows to make a hoop to carry the chain link past the post. I did not want to screw anything to the house so I rebent wall brackets to clamp the top and bottom rails to the line post


4

A 24-inch depth works well for a 4-foot tall fence, but a fence that is 6 feet high should have posts sunk 3 feet deep or more. So dependent on the fence height above ground you may need to go with the 4x4x10. Crushed rock works well for supporting fence posts because it contains rock pieces of a few inches in size, fine pebbles as well as fine gravel dust, ...


4

At the ground, you're mostly concerned with keeping the posts located. You don't want bumps to slide them around. A simple steel pin or bolt in the concrete is adequate. If you like, use a short stack of washers to keep the wood (mostly) out of contact with the concrete to improve longevity. At the top, I'd use 1/2" lag screws, countersunk and piloted. Two ...


4

I use 2 large C clamps to hold a board in place. You can screw a guide board to the post if you don't have large C clamps. Then use a circular saw with the blade adjusted to the angle you want. By using a board the cut will be straight. Then move the board to the next side and repeat. There will be small screw holes in the post if you use screws but I have ...


4

In clay soil, the water just sits in the hole, especially where the water table is close to the surface. Gravel lets the water get right up against the post, which will rot it out fast. Using concrete will help the post to last longer, if you create a dome of concrete above soil level and make sure it is smooth and tight against the post. This will ensure ...


4

I always have used 2' underground so use an 8' post for a 6' fence. I don't know if this would be adequate for a taller fence, but it would probably do at least for an 8' fence. Once while replacing termite eaten cedar 4x4" posts I encountered a soft limestone 14" or so below ground. I dug 4" or 6" deep into the limestone with a steel digging bar and ...


4

If a picture is worth a thousand words Here is a 4K word answer


4

5” cover around the steel pole is not enough. Most electrical contractors have augurs in the 12”, 18”, 24” diameter. I’d go with the 24” diameter for four reasons: 1) it will give you 9 1/2” cover (if the pole ends up EXACTLY in the middle...doubtful), 2) the 24” width will help resist overturning, if it’s windy like you say, and 3) the rebar needs to be 3”...


3

Years ago, growing up on a rural farm in the midwest, my father solved the drunk driver mail box problem. He did this after drivers and snowplows took out the mail box several times. He placed the mail box on a long arm that was cantilevered over a swivel post 10 to 12 feet off the side of the roadway. The design of the swivel post was such that the mail ...


3

Hi I had the same issue and some similar thoughts. I tried the drilling out process with an extended drill spade bit, But could not drill all of the post out. In the end I was able to remove all of the remainder by driving a stainless steel tube down the hole cutting the rotten post out a chunk at a time. Then sliding another smaller tube down the middle of ...


3

I would break up the concrete and redo. It'll be a lot easier to take out of the hole in chunks, or re-use as backfill.


3

Sanding with or against the grain doesn't matter much until the last sanding stage, if that. Lots of us use random-orbit sanders which sand in all directions at once, and that works Just Fine. The first sanding pass, with the coarsest grit sandpaper, does most of the work of levelling the surface; ideally, it should leave you with no scratches larger than ...


3

You would certainly need to consult a structural engineer and get all plans approved and permitted before beginning work. It will be expensive but since you indicate willingness here goes.... It is completely possible to relocate that post. The question will always be price and design. In my humble opinion the work isn't even all that difficult once you know ...


3

My suspicion is that the ceiling joists are lapped over that beam, something like: So moving the beam is nearly impossible without major structural work. Furthermore, in the basement, under the post there is likely a footer. You'd need to crack the concrete floor and dig a 20 inch deep hole and fill it with concrete and rebar for the new post location in ...


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