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20

The most common failure with posts in concrete is "collar rot", where the post rots right at the point where it exits the concrete at the ground line. This can be easily avoided if the concrete is slightly above ground grade and domed or tapered away from the post so water doesn't lay against the wood. Drainage is the key, keep standing water away from the ...


12

This all depends on soil conditions. Loamy soil with good drainage, the concrete is probably OK. Clay soil, the concrete doesn't really do anything short of trapping water against the wood. In both cases, many people suggest not using concrete at all. Instead, dig the hole deeper than the post and then add some gravel to the bottom. Insert the post, then ...


12

It isn't a question of post size. Well, it is, but you have bigger concerns: The brackets will not serve your purpose. They're mostly designed to anchor the base of the post, and to keep it off the concrete. They don't provide nearly enough stability to keep a post standing under load. Your posts must be embedded a substantial distance into the concrete. 1:...


7

I would use a punch to make a small dent in the pole so my drill bit wouldn't slip.


7

The plan will make the 4x4s look good. However, you did say they are LOAD BEARING, an epoxy is great for holding things together or protecting things, but terrible at withstanding stress from a load. The posts function is to transfer the weight above it to the ground, so filling in the rotted parts of the wood with epoxy is just hiding the problem. Most ...


6

Short answer: No. If they ring when you tap them like you did in your video, then they are solid. Sand them and paint them with a good rust inhibiting paint.


6

Wrap one end of the rope around a pillar 3-4 times, tie the loose end back to the standing portion of the rope (probably with a bowline), and then slide the wraps up to the top of the pillar so that the part furthest from the knot is highest, with the rope smoothly wrapping down from that point. Do the same for the other end, tightening the rope enough to ...


5

The punch suggested by SpectralGhost is a good idea. If that doesn't work, you can make a jig with three pieces of 2x4. Screw the pieces together and drill a pilot hole for the drill bit (the dotted line) using the same size bit you intend to use on the pipe.


5

Automobile floor jack and a jackstand. Place on both sides of broken pole. Straddle from jackstand to jack with two 2' x 6's screwed together. Wrap chain around 2x6 and using a cordless drill, screw lag bolts through chain into broke off fence post. Raise jackstand to keep level with jack. lift with jack, stop and raise jackstand to equal height. 2-3 rounds ...


5

Long (18" and longer) drill bits do exist. If the hole is wide enough, bit extensions are also usable. However, there's also a simple-but-elegant cheat. Cut the piece lengthwise, rout a channel in one or both sides, glue back together. If you make a thin-kerf cut, and are careful during reassembly, the glue line can be nearly invisible -- especially on ...


5

I had this exact question regarding a 16x16 sun shade I am installing. I am planning on 8' above ground height and need 12' posts. I reviewed my project with a friend who is contractor, his response was that: a 4x4 will handle the load put 1/3 of the post in the ground (also cited in the other answer here) a 4x6 or 6x6 will look better 4x4s are more likely ...


4

I had the same situation at my place, I set the post and ran the top rail past it to the house and set elbows to make a hoop to carry the chain link past the post. I did not want to screw anything to the house so I rebent wall brackets to clamp the top and bottom rails to the line post


4

Concerete around a fence post is to help with lateral stability. It's not being used as a footer, since there isn't a whole lot of weight involved with a fence post. As such, there's no need for concrete to be below the bottom of the post...in fact, you like don't want that, as you want any water that gets between the concrete and wood to have a place to ...


4

I'm going through the same thing with a similar fence in a similar setting. There appear to be three options: Attempt to repair the existing posts. Pros: straightforward. Cons: expensive and you risk having to redo everything within a short time when another part of the posts rots out. Could be ugly looking, too. Yank the broken posts and replace them. ...


4

How tall are your posts to start with? A 6 foot above ground post should have at least 2 feet in the ground in your area. I would be setting them in concrete so you have a good solid base and good ballast. A metal post in concrete won't rust as long as you dome the top of the concrete so water runs away from the post. I'll share a clever trick that ...


4

I just went through the process of removing a broken-off fence post without removing the concrete pier. Tough job! I expected it would only take a couple of hours, and that replacing just the post would be easier than digging out and breaking out the old pier, disposing of the concrete, and pouring a new pier. Maybe not, though, especially if the old post ...


4

It may be easier to make a post out of two 2x4's where you can use a router to cut in a V groove down the center of the face of each piece. The two V grooves facing each other would make a channel down the middle of the post. You may want to consider the use of a PVC conduit in the channel to eliminate the possibility of rusting. An easier procedure than ...


4

At the ground, you're mostly concerned with keeping the posts located. You don't want bumps to slide them around. A simple steel pin or bolt in the concrete is adequate. If you like, use a short stack of washers to keep the wood (mostly) out of contact with the concrete to improve longevity. At the top, I'd use 1/2" lag screws, countersunk and piloted. Two ...


4

I use 2 large C clamps to hold a board in place. You can screw a guide board to the post if you don't have large C clamps. Then use a circular saw with the blade adjusted to the angle you want. By using a board the cut will be straight. Then move the board to the next side and repeat. There will be small screw holes in the post if you use screws but I have ...


4

I always have used 2' underground so use an 8' post for a 6' fence. I don't know if this would be adequate for a taller fence, but it would probably do at least for an 8' fence. Once while replacing termite eaten cedar 4x4" posts I encountered a soft limestone 14" or so below ground. I dug 4" or 6" deep into the limestone with a steel digging bar and ...


4

If a picture is worth a thousand words Here is a 4K word answer


3

Years ago, growing up on a rural farm in the midwest, my father solved the drunk driver mail box problem. He did this after drivers and snowplows took out the mail box several times. He placed the mail box on a long arm that was cantilevered over a swivel post 10 to 12 feet off the side of the roadway. The design of the swivel post was such that the mail ...


3

I would break up the concrete and redo. It'll be a lot easier to take out of the hole in chunks, or re-use as backfill.


3

Hi I had the same issue and some similar thoughts. I tried the drilling out process with an extended drill spade bit, But could not drill all of the post out. In the end I was able to remove all of the remainder by driving a stainless steel tube down the hole cutting the rotten post out a chunk at a time. Then sliding another smaller tube down the middle of ...


3

You would certainly need to consult a structural engineer and get all plans approved and permitted before beginning work. It will be expensive but since you indicate willingness here goes.... It is completely possible to relocate that post. The question will always be price and design. In my humble opinion the work isn't even all that difficult once you know ...


3

My suspicion is that the ceiling joists are lapped over that beam, something like: So moving the beam is nearly impossible without major structural work. Furthermore, in the basement, under the post there is likely a footer. You'd need to crack the concrete floor and dig a 20 inch deep hole and fill it with concrete and rebar for the new post location in ...


3

Concrete touching the foundation shouldn't be a problem, but make sure that you aren't constraining any of the services (wires and pipes) shown in the picture, and that you aren't butting up against the siding, potentially entrapping crud and/or insects.


3

Sure. Just make sure the face where the fence attaches, is in line with the 4x4s.


3

Concrete does not react well with normal wood, so don't pour up along the post. That's why the little block is on top of the pier you have, its made either of pressure treated wood, or redwood. If you really want a better pier, pour one a little larger then what you have, and you can include a metal hold down or strap to make sure nothing moves later. (and ...


3

Assuming that the framing around the post socket is solid, this is what I'd do for a rock-solid result: Procure some items: Heavy-duty construction adhesive--the kind that comes in a caulking gun tube. Liquid Nails in blue/gold is what I have in mind. Wood shims. 6" are ok. 8" are better. A bubble level in the 2-4' range Utility knife with a fresh blade ...


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