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27

Unless your home is a 20 bedroom mansion I would simply tell them to keep that off your driveway period. You can't tell what load it will take because it depends how packed it still is, what condition it is in and how thick it was poured (and if this was uniformly done). Often these large trucks will crack driveways in the corners of their pours since ...


23

Disclaimer: I'm not a structural engineer, nor should you believe the word of a internet stranger. Contact a local structural engineer to take a look so you don't bring the house down. A few details point to the wall visible in the photo being load bearing: There is a beam in the open bit next to the wall. This implies something is worth supporting up ...


7

I'd bet it is bearing. The picture shows a wall with a large opening and a door. I'll assume the plan view is the second floor plan. In the picture you can see your knotty pine running parallel with the wall. This typically means that they are secured to the rafters and are perpendicular. The rafters are then resting one end on that wall. This is also ...


4

You need a layout of the ceiling joists to determined if it is load bearing. However, I would highly lean towards believing that it is a structural support wall. The exposed beam that runs in the span beside it is a good indicator. Licensed Home Builder AL HBLB #25782


4

Like most have already said, I also believe it's a load bearing wall.. So for all the clues others have mentioned that it's a bearing wall, I also wanna add, and this may or may not actually be applicable here, but that it's common to hatch shear walls diagonally like the drawings show, so not only is that wall a part of your load bearing system, it may also ...


4

Yes, it’s acceptable to have bearing walls NOT align vertically, provided: 1) the walls are less distance apart than the depth of the joists, or 2) the side that has the upper bearing wall rests on a considerably shorter span, 3) the load is accounted for in the design of the joists. 1) If the upper wall is slightly off center, the upper load will transfer ...


3

You can use a concept from rock climbing here. There are methods of attaching to multiple anchors that are meant to distribute the load to three anchors, such as a cordalette: You can search and find instructions for how to tie a cordalette, which might be all you need. There are other methods that are meant to have some slip so that the load is ...


3

It's highly unlikely that there's a full beam in that wall. There's probably a doubled 2x10 header over the opening. Plan on installing a 3-1/2" by 14" LVL beam (or steel) to span that distance (after talking to an engineer, of course). You can remove studs under a load-bearing beam if the beam is designed for the resulting span(s) and the remaining studs (...


3

Observations studying the drawing, 100% Load Bearing. Section A will confirm further. Structural engineers will always span the shortest distance for timber joists. Taking out that wall, is physically impossible to do that without steel (span the floor over that is what I mean.) plus you would remove partial bearing support of the landing to the top of the ...


3

I would use 3/16 Tapcon screws. (Use 5/32 masonry bit.) The Tapcon screws are thread hardened specifically for use in masonry materials. The hardened thread will hold up better than a wood or machine screw. A lighter (smaller diameter) screw will likely suffice, but in my experience sometimes heavier weights get placed on shelves. To level the shelves, I ...


3

Understand the constraints of the existing framing. I'd have probably kept the new vertical 2x4 you added 3.5" shorter (along with the plywood spacer you added), and made the header stick out 3.5" on that side to rest on top of that new 2x4. You'd essentially be using the existing vertical 2x4 as the king stud and your new 2x4 as the jack stud, ...


3

Yes. That's what pigtails are for. No problem at all. Incoming (from panel) wires -> LINE side of GFCI Outgoing wires - short pigtails (colors matching the outgoing wires, normally black & white) -> LOAD side of GFCI On the other end of each pigtail, wire nut the two matching wires to the other locations. All grounds (both sides) are connected ...


2

A typical install would us 2x4's with plywood across. Basically mimic wood stud framing. Doing the same with 2x2's should be fine for this application. I'm assuming a 100lb dead load. Use 23/32" sheathing plywood or MDF. Mount with nuts/bolts into the plywood and framing nails elsewhere. Weak point would be tearout of a connector not deflection of the 2x2 ...


2

Probably your wires are thin and/or the line serving your appliance is long. Anyway the standard voltage is 230 +/-10% so anything between 207 and 253 is regular. Remember that voltage drop on a wire increase with the current so having a lower resistance (thicker) cable will reduce the voltage drop. Usually for 16A circuits is used 2,5mm^2 (or 4mm^2) cable ...


2

This indicates that you have a higher resistance in the service connection than there should be. I think you should get a service call from a competent electrician.


2

I would sister several of the joists, then add solid blocking in each span. The blocking might not be critical, but the ceiling is now open so why not? Solid blocking does not need strapping across the bottom. Look closely where the joists meet the load-bearing wall at each end. A 2x6 ledger might give extra assurance. Look at the rest of the floor structure ...


2

Picture 2 clearly shows the relation of front door to “wall I want to remove”. The wall you want to remove is a bearing wall ... supporting the roof as shown in last Picture #7, from the exterior. That one small opening you’ve cut in the ceiling in Pictures #1 and #3 shows something spanning the opposite direction you’re indicating the joists run. You’d ...


2

I had a very similar situation at my previous home. As far as I'm concerned, safety isn't much of an issue. It's mostly you going in and out, and not very often. The real concern is bottoming clearance for your mower. It's akin to asking what a tolerable slope is on a trailer ramp. Do a little experimentation to find out what slope your mower allows with ...


2

5° is standard (ADA) which is 1:12. So at 8" height you would have an 8' ramp. If this is too long to line up the mower, shorten/steepen it as little as is necessary for you to use it. How steep is too steep is impossible to know without understanding all the circumstances. Find a solid sloped surface somewhere nearby and test drive the mower up and down, ...


2

Since your front section at one time was a garage the there was a need to provide a fire break wall between the garage and the living portion of the house. Since the garage undoubtedly had an open ceiling all the way up into the rafter area the fire break wall had to extend way up to the roof line. To support the heavy drywall used as sheathing on the fire ...


2

When you're using old style steam switches, 3-way circuits look like this. Yellow=travelers, red=switched-hot. Note in this switch position the light will be off. Notice that there are 2 travelers, and the remote 3-way is lucky if the third wire is neutral. There's no question of bringing always-hot along with the travelers; there simply isn't a 4th ...


2

Talk to your inspector (AHJ), but I suspect you have too much solar for your panel's bussing Normally, all the current in a panel is sourced from a single point, and thus the panel busbars are protected by a single OCPD (main breaker or upstream feeder breaker), meaning that the panel's busbars cannot be overloaded without eventually tripping the OCPD. ...


2

I doubt the wall between the living and dining area is structural. It appears you have a one-story (in that area) living space with roof trusses spanning 26’ from front to back of your house indicating no load don that wall. Things to consider: I’d go down in the basement below that wall and see if there is any posts coming down through the wall above, ...


2

Almost any good quality 5mm (#12) screw in a set of four will carry 10kg (~22 lbs.) without issue, assuming that you're in solid anchoring. Plastic plugs of the correct size should do well, or wood if you're precise. I would actually consider using stainless steel machine-thread screws with hex heads. They'll look nicer and allow you to rotate the head to ...


2

How much weight can a 3/4" x 8" lag bolt hold when drilled in half way? It's not just about weight but where and how that weight is applied. In your case, it would seem that the how is purely vertical, that is, no tension and applied to the perpendicular grain of the tree. The where is still open. Where on the bolt is the load applied? The further it is ...


2

First, I don't know about those charts. (actually I do know; I browsed them on Friday as part of other research; but you need to look at context and notice they are and NOT for breakers in your home.) The only trip curve that matters to you is the one published in the catalog for the breakers that are in your own panel. It's possible to get breakers ...


1

Check with the manufacturer of the fixture. They should have some design parameters. If they are modern day conventional residential roof trusses, I recommend contacting a mfg of same. See what they say. I personally would take a 3' piece of standard #2-and-better 4x6 lumber, free of flaws, lay it perpendicular across the top side of two trusses to use as ...


1

Honestly I think you are over thinking this. As long as your anchor point spread out too far you shouldn't have a problem you don't really need to worry too much about transferring load because there is only one load on it. If you plan on swinging in your hammock that's a different story. On the other hand you don't have to worry about plummeting to your ...


1

The first thing that comes to mind is getting a welded steel ring to act as the "junction" point for your rope: Random welded ring on Amazon These are normally available at hardware stores in the rope and chain section. Other options would be a chain "quick link" or a load-rated carabiner (not the keychain type). The upper ropes that are fastening to the ...


1

The dimensions of that table are 3' 9" wide and 7' 8" long. Turn the table top sideways and it will slide right into the van. Stack the chairs on top of each other seat-to-seat beside the table top from front to back. Slide the legs in between the legs of the chairs and it should all fit. You can probably place the chairs any way you like with the table ...


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