Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
25

This is often a complex legal situation due to regulations that affect (in many parts of the world) what you can do in or near a body or stream of water even if the land next to it or around it belongs to you; not to mention the fact that you are fighting with a force that has literally shaped the planet, and it's inexorable and quite capable of undoing many ...


16

Legal issues aside (that's not our pigeon here), a reliable way is dry mix sand bagging:- Pick a low quality concrete sans water, place it at your leisure and let the rain /moisture make it go off. It's a common civil engineering technique, and very efficient in terms of cost, effort and design experience. It also requires very little ground preparation, ...


15

You asked for optimal: Follow a few thousand years of practical experience and put in a tension brace (lower outside corner to top hinge-side corner - opposite what you are going for, which is a compression brace) Go with the past few hundred years and make it a turnbuckle. The best form of compression brace "in plane" is none of the above, and has a point ...


13

As mentioned in another answer, there may be legal issues since the creek is a waterway. In the US, you would have Federal and probably state laws involved (many other countries have similar laws about waterways, even if you own the property). I would not try to fill the creek bed back in without approval, even if it is technically your property. What you ...


10

Nails are used in almost all framing and structural applications. Most code books are designed with nails in mind and will have specific minimum nailing requirements and patterns for different applications. Structural screws are coming more and more on the market every day, but because most code books don't include them you will need an engineer's approval ...


8

Been there , done that; my creek ( Plum Creek, Highland IN) was 30ft. width and embankment was 40 ft. high. I "coated" it with railroad ties, bricks, and many cuttings of trees and bushes. To reach my height I used 3 tiers of RR ties with slopes between. It required a lot of stuff and work. Yours looks much more manageable. Look for affordable rip-rap ;aka ...


7

What I’ve seen commonly done is either large rocks or large chunks of concrete dumped to protect the area eroding. You say it is slow moving, so I’m betting the erosion primarily happens during/after rains causing high, fast moving water. I think you’ll want pretty large rocks/concrete at the base (like maybe 2.5’ or 3’). If you own the other side, you can ...


6

Static load affects structures much differently than dynamic (moving) load. A dynamic load will give periods of relaxation for members to return to their previous shape. A static load will promote bending. Considering the pressure and surface area, you basically need this to sit on your slab. The tank can't take pressure, and you don't want the tank pulling ...


6

What you described with the 45 degree bevel is called a french cleat. It's used for securing heavy items to walls and I've seen them used in upper kitchen cabinet installations. 1x6 hardwood cut in half on a 45 I think would suffice. I would consider putting one on the top and one on the bottom (mounted upside down) if you have enough room to slide the ...


5

Here would be my basic approach (Mechanical Engineer here, Statics TA for 4 semesters): For starters, you could figure out the weight of the mattress and box spring plus the weight of two people lying on it (W). Add in a safety factor (at a minimum 2, ideally a bit more) - remember, an uneven or dynamic loading will apply significantly higher stresses to ...


5

You could truss the tubes as shown in the picture below. The center block helps to support the tube when the truss member is placed in tension. The truss could be constructed from heavy wire or threaded steel rod. The concept here would be similar to the scheme used on the wider steps of a wooden step ladder. I would have suggested the possibility to ...


5

There isn't enough information in that sketch to verify calculations (for instance, we have no idea what's on the floor above), but here are some reactions: Removing 60cm of support may be significant, depending on how much load that wall was carrying. If the arch is structural, removing it requires additional support. Your existing building may not be ...


5

It will be fine in terms of the weight... the 4x4s in the center will easily handle the load. I'm a bit concerned about the OSB though. Personally if it isn't too late I'd really suggest 3/4" CDX plywood. But if it's too late don't lose sleep over it, just a long shot.


5

The structural engineer sized that as a W6x25 steel beam because he wanted it flush in the 2x8 floor system as it is only 6.38" deep. If you changed it to a LVL, you would need a 3 ply 11-7/8" LVL, which would stick 4-5/8" below the floor system and you would have to build a soffit there. The steel posts are there on either end because of large end ...


4

If you can't use the truss technique described by @michaelkaras, the only real solution would be to move to thicker-walled tubing or larger diameter tubing. Anything you fill the tube with is not likely to make much of a difference at all. All the bending strength of the tubular member comes from its topmost and bottommost elements. The center of the tube ...


4

Normal Vibrations in Buildings Have Identifiable Sources I've encountered a vast range of vibrations in multi-dwelling buildings I have lived. Hear are the ones I can remember: washing machine spin cycle (this happens often and, if it matches the resonance of the building can travel throughout multiple floors) dishwasher valves and drain pump (not very ...


4

More or less a question for mechanics and machinists and an easy one. If you've ever busted a head stud off on a Jaguar, you know of the evils needed to get the remainder out of the block. Lots of methods out there, but aside from electrostatic erosion, most methods involve using a drill. This drilling machine is magnetic because the base is a very strong ...


4

OK first let me say that if you're going to be making major structural changes to a building (and this counts as a pretty serious structural change in my mind) it would be well worth your while to get an engineer or other qualified building professional to help you with your design. If you just "wing it" you may be endangering the house and its occupants. ...


4

Once you have corrected your axis of rotation it should be obvious that the idea to lengthen the "clip" will not change anything with regard to the force required to raise the flap. Actually it could make things worse if the longer clip added more weight to the whole assembly. The force needed to raise the flap is measured in some units like foot-pounds (ft-...


4

As @OrgnicLawnDIY suggests, use french cleats. These are 1x4 or 1x6 boards cut on a 45 degree angle. The lower section has the short side against the wall and the upper section, attached to the item to be hung, lowers into the trough created to snug the piece into the wall. Many carpenters use strips of 3/4" or 1 " plywood instead of solid boards. You can ...


4

If I'm reading this right(and looking at the final picture), the beam itself is sagging. It may have reached an equilibrium point, and simply jacking up an reattaching it will fix it. But you'll still have a bowed beam. My inclination is, a properly built beam should be able to span that distance and hold the weight without sagging. I have smaller, longer ...


4

Seeing as you're in the UK (lots of well-enforced building regulations) and you're wanting to remove at least one load-bearing wall (the old external wall), you absolutely need to bring in the pros and start dealing with all the hassles of permitted renovation. I'm not sure if you'll be allowed to do any of the work yourself, but if you are, it will ...


4

Presumably you engaged this person for their professional expertise, so can you indicate why you feel you are qualified to override them? Or is your question based on aesthetics or practicality? If it is the former, you're on slippery ground. If it is the latter, I would simply ask them and make whatever alternative suggestion you have. For example, "is ...


4

Most things we build are rectangular, and rectangular structures are prone to racking, which is illustrated in this drawing of a deck, but the same problem affects your rectangular shelves: As you see a structure can collapse due to racking if the joints flex without tearing apart. There are various ways to counter racking. Other shapes, like ...


4

Adding to some already good answers, I'd emphasize using vegetation to help stabilize the bank. Only one answer (https://diy.stackexchange.com/a/162118/76258 - a great one) mentioned that so far. My construction experience is limited but I have seen streambank stabilization done in various forestry operations. Vegetation and riprap is the key technique ...


4

Just a heads up, spanning 22' while being limited to 4-6" floor depth is extremely cost prohibitive. Deeper is always cheaper, but it sounds like you don't have the space to make this work as planned. What's below this storage space you want to create? Can you legally reduce the head height by framing the floor lower? This would allow for more storage space ...


3

I can't speak as to how to calculate it, but from experience, 2x4s are overkill. For the beds I've seen, 1x3s slats (laid down, not vertical), with a vertical 1x4 perimeter, were sufficient unless both people weigh 300+lbs. You will want a center rail and possibly a center leg (some mattress warranties actually require one!). Reducing the span length is a ...


3

putting the legs on the inside will induce a shearing load on the connection. A better connection would be having the wood frame rest on the leg (with a notch). You also need to account for the needed strength in the corners so everything stays square. or you can do a google search on bed plans and get a tried and tested design the first link even only ...


3

"...the short answer is, don't use the 2 x 4 for your swing..." Otis' question was posted long ago, but I thought this may help other people researching similar structural questions. I'm not an engineer, but I've worked with wood for 30+ years. An interesting question, and one a lot of DIYers ignore, and limit their consideration to one thing: is that 2 x ...


3

One thing that no one has mentioned: screws WILL NOT pull down a deck board nearly as tightly as a nail. If you have a twisted board or a board with a crown, a screw is pretty much useless. Screwing deck boards also creates large holes for water to soak into and rot much faster. Using a 3 inch galvanized nail and nailing it flush will pull the boards ...


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