27

Like others have said in comments, drywall was commonly nailed in pairs to help prevent punch-through--hammers had a tendency to crush the drywall and weaken the hold of the nail. When screws were first adopted the practice was continued until it was known that precisely set flute-head screws hold better than nail heads, or until old-timers retired away. Fun ...


10

Contractor here. My opinion only. Contractors turn down jobs for a million reasons. Maybe they don't agree that your job is 'stable and high paying'. (Parenthetically, you can't know anything about their cost of doing business, so 'high paying' is an exceptionally variable metric.) Maybe they're busy. Maybe you ring alarm bells. Speaking of alarm bells, ...


6

I don't think this indicates a problem. Circuit breakers have at least 2 different triggers for cutting the power: Thermal mechanism for small over-current protection, e.g. trying to draw 20 amps from a 15 amp circuit. This may take several seconds or even more than a minute, depending on how much over the rated capacity you are. Magnetic mechanism for ...


6

My guess: The drywaller (novice) sank the screws too deep and broke the paper; yes, all of them! Their boss/inspector came by and told them it's not acceptable The drywaller had to re-screw their work Putting in a new screw close to the original screw is an easy way to make sure they hit a stud


5

Just put a piece of drywall in and give it a first coat of mud and tape. Seriously this is 10 minutes and no mess. Big box sells little kits for $10 or less for stuff like this. Then when you get around to selling no one will really mind a little patchwork to do in closet.


5

If your basement is even somewhat functional then I would try to wire to the attic. I think a good rule of thumb would be would you let your out of work cousin stay in your basement a few days? If it is even that nice I would go for the attic, given that you can reasonably get to almost all areas of your attic. Remember for bedrooms with outer walls that ...


5

Vinyl siding has seams between the pieces. You can push/pull at one of these to make enough room to get a small pen light inside for a peak. You can also inspect around any protrusions like water faucets or vents. Lastly, you can get a special vinyl pulling tool that is a thin blade with a small hook at the end. It's designed to be forced between two pieces ...


5

The tip I got from an electrician was to just buy the big boxes; the cost difference is minor, it's easier to work in bigger boxes, and then you don't have to work about it.


5

It was probably temporary bracing used during construction. It can be safely removed once the roof structure is complete and the walls have structural sheathing properly installed.


5

I have removed similar wallpaper multiple times and if it is like the type I have removed it is actually relatively easy to take off of the wall. You will simply soak it with a hot water and vinegar combo over and over until it peels off easily. You may need to soak one area 4-5 times over the course of an hour but you can do everything at the same time ...


5

If this is short-term and you have the space (i.e., private driveway) and permission (you don't live in a neighborhood where a homeowner's association or similar bureaucracy has rules against such things), the best thing would be a storage container that is brought to your location. Essentially like the trailer of a big truck, but designed to be lifted up ...


4

I would guess that your issue is that you didn't prime first. From Wikipedia: A primer or undercoat is a preparatory coating put on materials before painting. Priming ensures better adhesion of paint to the surface, increases paint durability, and provides additional protection for the material being painted You buy primer from the same store you would ...


4

Rewiring a house is an advanced activity; you have to understand what is code and what is reasonable, and then understand how to get wire to the places where you need to get wire. This will probably involve damage to some finished surfaces. I would not go the baseboard route, as it doesn't look very good and you would need to protect the wire against nails. ...


4

The hydraulic jack is an excellent way to be sure you have enough leverage, but more importantly, a high degree of control. Jackscrews are not as good at lifting by rotating the leadscrew due to high friction, which is overcome with a cheater bar so there is not as much feel developed. The jackscrew is excellent for holding a load securely, whereas a ...


4

I have been searching far and wide for answers to the same question, with one minor exception. I want to convert an existing single fireplace to a "see-through," or double fireplace, and put a natural gas insert, to be direct-vented through the existing flu. I have come to my own conclusions which have been reinforced by Jack in his answer above, and many ...


4

The easiest route to getting a straight, vertical wall is to identify the furthest out studs and then shim out those studs that are not as far out. Similarly, find the area on each stud that is furthest into the room and then shim the recessed areas of the stud to match. Shimming can be done using cedar shims, sold by the bundle in big box stores and lumber ...


4

The 2x4 ledger is sufficient to support your 2x8 joists, but it needs 4 or 5 16d common nails per stud at 16" on center to be able to carry the load if it is only carrying the floor load and no roof load. Typically the framers would have also nailed the side of the floor joist to the side of the wall stud so the the ledger isn't carrying all of the load, but ...


4

I'd paint the ceiling, unless it's like new it will look out of place with fresh walls and floors. Installing some down lights I'd do this first because of gravity - dirt falls down - you don't want that on brand new carpets, even the walls might get dirty so do it before the paint. No big deal painting around recessed lighting. Painting ...


4

The chair in the photo is indeed webbed cane. It features the most common (and traditional) installation method - the cane is woven in a sheet and held onto the chair by a spline pressed in a groove. The pane may be on a removable frame but sometimes the frames are integral to the structure of the chair. The pale wood strip around the perimeter of the cane ...


4

From the 2 images you've attached, this is not a load bearing group of walls. Feel free to remove all 3 of them.


4

You have enough room to get what you want, but nothing more than that The good news is that your panel can accept double-stuff (tandem/quadruplex) breakers at all positions, which means you can free up just enough room for the two new circuits in your panel and a feeder to a subpanel, but nothing more without compromising your ability to retrofit AFCI ...


3

Yes you can set drywall directly to the block wall. If it intersects with an exterior wall that is exposed to the weather, I would place a layer of poly of out of the intersecting corner, if accessible, out no more than 2', 18" would probably be better, vertically to prevent any moisture coming through the block and getting into the sheetrock. Use drywall ...


3

I would not let a designer make these kind of decisions. A good architect, a builder, or a good general contractor would be your best bet. You could always bring in a city inspector and ask them for a few thoughts too. If money is no object than almost anything goes with a basement. You can basically put a wall anywhere as long as you aren't moving ...


3

You should be able to remove the carpet and padding without disturbing the tile. Then you can install a floating laminate wood floor without any concern. A hardwood floor that requires nailing would be a bigger concern.


3

Freestanding steel studs are fine (assuming they are anchored to a sill and top plate). Steel studs anchored to the furring strips are fine. Why wouldn't steel studs anchored to the furring strips, plaster and lath be fine? The only limitation would be if the lath and plaster had significant bowing or hollowing in spots that the new studs came in contact ...


3

There are a few considerations to cost, I don't consider reliability to be a major factor in either style of roof. Dormer and shed style roofs have been used for many hundreds of years successfully. The main choice for either of these is aesthetics, and simplicity of assembly. First, if you have to deal with a large snow load it is cheaper and easier to go ...


3

I can attest to the other answer(s) here as to the utility of the 20 ton hydraulic bottle jacks for this purpose. I purchased two of them for a very similar project where I was taking out an existing metal support post and sistering an existing beam with three glue lams to gain a clear span support. The bottle jacks worked extremely well.


3

Every 14 ga. wire entering (or exiting) the box needs 2 cubic inches. Every 12 ga. needs 2.25 cubic inches. All grounds together count as 1 wire, as do internal clamps. Every device (such as a switch or a receptacle on a single strap) counts as double the wire size it connects to. Rough add-up (" standing for cubic inches): One 14/2 cable in (2x2"), two ...


3

You would certainly need to consult a structural engineer and get all plans approved and permitted before beginning work. It will be expensive but since you indicate willingness here goes.... It is completely possible to relocate that post. The question will always be price and design. In my humble opinion the work isn't even all that difficult once you know ...


3

My suspicion is that the ceiling joists are lapped over that beam, something like: So moving the beam is nearly impossible without major structural work. Furthermore, in the basement, under the post there is likely a footer. You'd need to crack the concrete floor and dig a 20 inch deep hole and fill it with concrete and rebar for the new post location in ...


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