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27

First that post is not carrying the load of the whole house. The beam is and the beam is attached on both sides. The post's job is to keep the beam from sagging and act as a point load. I would not leave it like that for sure - and in my area there is no way in the world it would meet local code. Always have to be secured on both ends by at least two ...


17

This is fine. It's a wooden open web truss system. The weight is transferred to the column at the one top point. The lower bar and diagonal bracing are to prevent the top bar from sagging over a wide span. The lower bar extends all the way to the wall so there is something for the ceiling drywall to screw into, but isn't supposed to rest on the column....


11

At least in the area where I live, that type of support post is used when a house is modified (wall was removed, to prop up a sagging beam, etc). If the house was designed to have a support post there, the post would either be the same type of wood as the rest of the frame or would be a solid (not adjustable) metal post. The lack of screws/bolts on either ...


9

Notice the post is not just supporting the beam, it’s holding up ends of the boards that make up the beam! Would strongly recommend consulting an engineer ASAP and having the beam supported correctly. Versus any “I think it’ll be ok” patch that could indeed make things far worse.


8

This is not meant to be an authoritative answer, but I have worked in many homes and buildings of similar age and you almost always see some cracks in the beams, they are usually there for decades, in fact they probably occur when wood is new and drying out for the first time. Still it can't hurt to have someone take a look at it. You could take some ...


7

Just add (nail, screw, and/or glue) additional framing material to the side face of the joist to provide more bearing area for the subfloor.


6

If you want to install it yourself, great. But I suggest you start by having an engineer look at the application and calculate your requirements. Could be well worth the investment.


6

Shear strength of the hardware isn't going to be a real concern. A single 1/4" Grade 5 lag bolt, in a configuration like this, will fail at roughly 13,000 lbs. Even 1/8" lag screws (well down into "numbered" screw sizes) will have a shear strength of over 3,000 pounds. Your piece of slate, if its density and dimensions are fairly regular for the species of ...


6

Any of the pipe hangers available at your local big-box home improvement store are designed to support a full pipe. They would be just decorations if they didn't... Pick a type that seems simplest to you to use, get appropriate fasteners (you're attaching this to concrete, a simple screw or nail isn't going to do the trick), ensure you've got the proper 1/4&...


5

For an 8.5' span I'd say no. The purpose of the jack studs isn't just to hold up the header - it also helps distribute the load more evenly to the foundation. For that wide of a span the IRC calls for 2 jacks(see R502.5 Allowable girder spans).


5

2015 INTERNATIONAL RESIDENTIAL CODE CHAPTER 15 EXHAUST SYSTEMS M1502.2 Independent exhaust systems. Dryer exhaust systems shall be independent of all other systems and shall convey the moisture to the outdoors. M1502.3 Duct termination. Exhaust ducts shall terminate on the outside of the building. Exhaust duct terminations shall be in accordance with the ...


5

Hmmm...no digging in the ground and no concrete. Sounds like the four perimeter beams will be your foundation. They’ll need to be treated for ground contact (pressure treated) as you indicate. Your total load will be about 220 lbs. (Live Load) as you indicate, plus about 800 lbs. in lumber and material (Dead Load). I did not add snow load as I’d assume ...


5

Unless there is more to this than you've shown, this was added AFTER construction to permit the installation of the squat rack. As such, it's NOT a part of the garage's structure and so removing it will not compromise it in any way.


5

The "very minimalist look" is a bit too minimalist for boring old function. You may regret "living with it" when it fails and a hunk of rock lands on your foot (or other body part), or someone else's. Failure is very much an option. Fasteners can be ripped out pretty easily, and wood can fail when you have a long lever (legs) attached to ...


4

What Nate said in his answer is true, but need to go a bit further on this question. There are several charts available that specify beam sizes based on span, spacing and types of materials used. A beam 20 foot long would be difficult to create with dimensional lumber, but not impossible. You will be more likely to find that a LAM or steel beam will be ...


4

@Ecnerwal and @UnhandledExcepSean, I believe you are correct. Looking at this thing from below, I can see screw holes where a speed bag was probably mounted in the past.


4

In general, bolts are great fasteners, and unless the engineers did a particularly poor job designing the connection, you shouldn't have to worry about a properly assembled pull up bar. The issue comes when bolts start to loosen up and move. If that bolt were to loosen up a bit, it would start to jiggle and move as you worked out. A pull-up bar will have ...


4

I wanted to follow up on this in case anyone stumbles upon it. I actually ended up using a relatively new solution -- a 2810HR Joist Reinforcer. It's a 14-gauge steel plate which allowed for a larger bore (in my case I made it 4.5") through a 2x10 and I put one on each side of the headers. The IBC/IRC certification they have for the plates passed ...


3

My suspicion is that the ceiling joists are lapped over that beam, something like: So moving the beam is nearly impossible without major structural work. Furthermore, in the basement, under the post there is likely a footer. You'd need to crack the concrete floor and dig a 20 inch deep hole and fill it with concrete and rebar for the new post location in ...


3

You would certainly need to consult a structural engineer and get all plans approved and permitted before beginning work. It will be expensive but since you indicate willingness here goes.... It is completely possible to relocate that post. The question will always be price and design. In my humble opinion the work isn't even all that difficult once you know ...


3

I did this before for a kitchen remodel, just as Mike mentioned, it looks like you have good access inside your attic. For the remodel I built a scaffold outside at the gable end that was closest to the work at hand, removed the vinyl siding in my case cut a hole in between the gable studs and pushed the LVL in from there. It took a second scaffold to get ...


3

it this case, it is not a home improvement project. Since it is a commercial building, you really need to have an engineer design a fix. the liability is to great in rental or commercial property not to have it endorsed. Don't take a cheap fix, it will bite you. The safety of a lot of people depend on how you fix the problem.


3

Your picture suggests that they are different truss types. The fact that one doesn't have the vertical member in the middle doesn't mean that it isn't needed. I could design a roof without any bracing members - that doesn't mean that you can go and take out bracing members from a different roof. My design would need chunkier members and connections to take ...


3

My house has encountered a very similar issue with joists splitting in the basement. I was told by two contractors that its been like that and not fallen down so no need to worry.. I don't accept that as an answer. I (as an engineer) called in an engineer who specialized in residential construction and inspection. The engineer I brought in had a ...


3

If I saw that in my basement I wouldn't worry about it until the column (post) started moving. But if I did want to get proactive I'd get a jack and a 4x4 set up next to that column and jack it until that post is loose. Then put a new steel plate in there which should last the next 50 years. And since this is internet advice and might actually be ...


3

There may be some options on how to handle this situation but you have left out some pretty important information. Missing is how high the existing 4x6 supports are already. It the posts are only 6 inches high then it would be pretty hard to add 30 inches on top of them. On the other hand if they are 4 feet high then the possibilities increase. Given ...


3

Concrete does not react well with normal wood, so don't pour up along the post. That's why the little block is on top of the pier you have, its made either of pressure treated wood, or redwood. If you really want a better pier, pour one a little larger then what you have, and you can include a metal hold down or strap to make sure nothing moves later. (and ...


3

2x8s aren't adequate for floor joists by modern standards, let alone for beams (even doubled). Someone probably added the steel beam and post due to floor bounce or sag. My former home had something nearly identical underneath where a fireplace was added. I'd either leave it in place or bolster the doubled 2x8s that are along the duct with additional ...


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