35

It looks like the cabinet is intended to sit on top of a base cabinet. You are right to be concerned about the structure of the cabinet. You can add a discrete support below it. In addition to the suggestions above I would add a couple of L brackets on the bottom.


29

Nearly all the reasons you proposed for leaving them free are rare occurrences. (I'm not sure what "doing the stove" means. Cleaning?) On those occurrences it's fairly easy to pull a few 3" screws and do your business. To my mind they don't outweigh the reasons you offered for anchoring them, which mostly involve stability (safety) and a quality feel. Most ...


24

If you are lacking a wooden peg or the skills to make one use round wooden toothpicks. Coat the toothpicks with woodglue. Place as many toothpicks in the hole as will fit. Gently tap in one more with a hammer. Break off any bits of toothpick that protrude from the hole. After the glue has dried, reinstall the screw.


21

Clean out the hole of debris and then carve a tapered peg from another piece of wood that will start into the hole. Fill the hole with wood glue and then pound in your peg. Let it dry overnight and then cut off the remainder of the peg flush with the surface. At this point you can drill a new pilot hole for your screws.


15

@Ralpharama- Use concrete screws (Tap-Cons) specifically the larger diameter screws that use a 3/16th inch concrete bit. You won't have to use as many screws so less drilling. Also use the the Tap-Cons with a hex head. They are easier to drive with the proper driver and don't strip-out as much as the Philips head screws. Finally, you want to drill pilot ...


15

@ojait's answer has good info about getting things attached into the wall (I'd rent a rotary hammer for this.) In order to make things a lot easier and get a good sturdy support I would suggest creating a french cleat. It will save you a lot of trouble. As @Criggie notes, the image below shows the holes evenly spaced and in a straight line. That is likely ...


14

OK, so this is a classic prep-paint situation, on a metal thing which has alkyd (that's what its mom calls oil paint when it's in trouble) or possibly LPU paint. Definitely not latex, so we dodged that bullet. shudder Latex paints are not for metal equipment like this. They will fail very quickly. However alkyds are very stinky. If you can't paint ...


11

If you're making many similar cuts, it's often worth it to build a jig. Jigs will allow you to make many repeatable cuts, quickly and easily. There are also loads of guides, slides, and jigs available off the shelf (or online anyway). Also, don't forget to use the proper blade. You probably wouldn't want to make furniture with a 24 tooth blade, unless you ...


11

I decided to try to install a cross brace inside the cabinet to spread the walls enough so the drawers would fit. I made a trip to the hardware store and picked up: A 1x6 pine board Angle brackets with screws Then I: measured the front opening of the cabinet. cut a piece off the pine board 2mm longer than the cabinet is wide. used a rubber mallet to tap ...


11

How about not screwing up your countertop seams, by moving? How about not collapsing sideways due to weight of porcelain + iron sink and granite counter? (I live in earthquake country...) How about not making drawers and doors not work correctly by being out of square? True, the back panel of cabinets ought to act as a shear brace... How about not having ...


11

You don't need to go to bare metal on paint that is well adhered. Hammerite has a particular "look" (a deliberately uneven, uniformly) surface which can help to hide surface defects under it - if that look is what you want. It's a common machine tool or toolbox finish - less of a common choice for the living room. But if you look at some and like it, that ...


11

You can change it so it opens the opposite direction. I.E. Flip the door over and attach the hinges to the left side of the cabinet. You can remove door by removing the screw on each hinge that holds them to the cabinet frame. Once you have the door un-atached you can measure where the holes are, from top and bottom, on the right side and transfer those ...


10

Cleats. Well, If I didn't simply add up what this expletive redacted liquor cabinet just cost me (not counting husky-containment and mopping time) and shoot it into the sun to be wholly replaced with a decently made hunk of furniture, which I'd be fairly inclined to do after what you just went through. I would glue and screw 1x2 wooden cleats (non-...


10

Looks like you got about 3.5" to make up. I'd put a couple of 2x4s front to back stacked flat and screwed down where the DW feet go. My wife and I are both tall and when we built our house we decided on a 39" counter height, meaning we had to build up for the range and dishwashers. Worked fine. It also means not having to bend over the dishwasher ...


9

They are the remnants from the rivets used to hold the pieces of steel together. Each rivet contains a piece that holds the metal together and a piece that looks similar to a finish nail. When the "nail like" piece is pulled by the riveting tool it distorts the head then breaks off. Pop Rivet set tool grips shank, draws ball head up through tube rivet to ...


9

The type of shelf pins shown in your photo are able to twist out of crappy MDF or particle board side walls when a lot of torque is placed on the pin due to excessive weight placed upon the shelf. There are alternate types of shelf bracket pins that are designed to keep the pin at 90 degrees to the side wall thus keeping it from torquing out of the hole. ...


9

Carpenters don't usually do custom cabinetry--it requires a special skillset and some specialized tools. Some do, of course, and if you find a high-caliber handyperson he or she could probably get the job done. A better bet is probably a local custom cabinet shop. They'll have the tooling required to match your design, edge profile, etc., and they'll be ...


9

Push up on the pointy thing and pull on the drawer. see details here


9

I'm a 62 year old (2nd gen.) custom cabinet shop owner and have a ton of experience in cabinets. I strongly suggest you really look at the back of that piece before you do anything. All the fasteners in the world mean nothing if the cabinet/furniture is built in such a way where it won't support itself on the wall. I think the easiest (not the most nicest ...


8

Absolutely, install backers. I prefer 2X6 backers. This will make your life so much easier when you install your cabinets.


8

I find it hard to believe that a few bottles would tear those pins out, unless either 1) the shelves are too short, resulting in a lot of torsional force, or 2) the pins weren't fully seated. Four pins, even in MDF, should support 100 lbs. easily. Custom and pre-built cabinets around the world use simple dowels for shelf support, even in particle board, and ...


8

In the UK at least your cabinets will all be screwed into the underside of your kitchen worktop (except stone worktops which will be glued down with silicone), and also all screwed to each other, so they will all be rigidly connected together anyway. Cabinets may also have utilities such as gas and electric services passing through them. For this reason ...


8

Yes, when doing in-bench or in-cabinet work like that, I am very comfortable with EMT, provided it is anchored properly and not used as a hanger for other things.


8

These plastic anchors can support up to 435 pounds (green) in concrete. Just make sure to use more than one :) If you choose something like a Tapcon screw then it really gets impressive: Just be careful not to overtighten or else you'll turn the concrete into dust and have almost no holding power. Whichever route you take just make sure you use a washer ...


7

While having all four mount points connect to structure (aka: the stud) is ideal, I think in your case, having two mount points in wood and two in a drywall anchor, you're going to be ok. Consider this question: What is the weight capacity of a drywall screw? One drywall screw CAN (not should) hold a lot of weight for its size. Also a properly installed ...


7

If you have access to the inside of the cabinet you could replace the wood screw with T-nut and a machine screw. You would need to drill the hole to fit the T-nut and place the T-nut on the inside of the cabinet. Again, this only works if you have access to both sides of the cabinet wall.


7

Whether you use a table saw or a circular saw, precision isn't based on the tool but on how you control the tool. With a circular saw, as long as your measurements are precise, you can get precision, if you can control the saw well. To that end, a track saw is a GREAT help. It can ensure your long cuts on lines are perfect (if your line is perfect, of ...


7

While I can't speak to the quality of all manufacturers blades, in general the blade that comes with the saw is of no lower quality than any other blade offered by the manufacturer. Most miter saws come with a 24 tooth FTG (Flat Top Grind) blade, which is good for fast course cuts. If you're looking to chop 2x lumber, this blade will work fine for you. If ...


7

It will be best to replace any doors where the plastic laminate has been burnt, distorted or partially melted.


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