29

Nearly all the reasons you proposed for leaving them free are rare occurrences. (I'm not sure what "doing the stove" means. Cleaning?) On those occurrences it's fairly easy to pull a few 3" screws and do your business. To my mind they don't outweigh the reasons you offered for anchoring them, which mostly involve stability (safety) and a quality feel. Most ...


23

If you are lacking a wooden peg or the skills to make one use round wooden toothpicks. Coat the toothpicks with woodglue. Place as many toothpicks in the hole as will fit. Gently tap in one more with a hammer. Break off any bits of toothpick that protrude from the hole. After the glue has dried, reinstall the screw.


21

Clean out the hole of debris and then carve a tapered peg from another piece of wood that will start into the hole. Fill the hole with wood glue and then pound in your peg. Let it dry overnight and then cut off the remainder of the peg flush with the surface. At this point you can drill a new pilot hole for your screws.


13

Particle board is generally pretty glue-able. Apply wood glue to the raw particle board and clamp the two pieces together overnight.


11

If you're making many similar cuts, it's often worth it to build a jig. Jigs will allow you to make many repeatable cuts, quickly and easily. There are also loads of guides, slides, and jigs available off the shelf (or online anyway). Also, don't forget to use the proper blade. You probably wouldn't want to make furniture with a 24 tooth blade, unless you ...


11

I decided to try to install a cross brace inside the cabinet to spread the walls enough so the drawers would fit. I made a trip to the hardware store and picked up: A 1x6 pine board Angle brackets with screws Then I: measured the front opening of the cabinet. cut a piece off the pine board 2mm longer than the cabinet is wide. used a rubber mallet to tap ...


11

How about not screwing up your countertop seams, by moving? How about not collapsing sideways due to weight of porcelain + iron sink and granite counter? (I live in earthquake country...) How about not making drawers and doors not work correctly by being out of square? True, the back panel of cabinets ought to act as a shear brace... How about not having ...


10

When installing cabinets, the "go-to" method is to "hang" them on a rail that you install first. The idea is that the rail, being much lighter and less bulky, is easier to put in place, get level, and then screw into the studs. Sometimes it's just one rail, sometimes two; depends on the cabinet system. The rail should be securely screwed into every stud ...


10

They are referred to as "Nail on Glides" at my local hardware store. They can be found near the other hardware like the hinges, locks, and door stops.


10

Cleats. Well, If I didn't simply add up what this expletive redacted liquor cabinet just cost me (not counting husky-containment and mopping time) and shoot it into the sun to be wholly replaced with a decently made hunk of furniture, which I'd be fairly inclined to do after what you just went through. I would glue and screw 1x2 wooden cleats (non-...


9

Echoing Steven's answer, I wouldn't do kitchen cabinets either. I would get/build a real workbench that can hold 100's of lbs on the surface. If you aren't up to building your own, you can buy some nice-looking kits from Lowe's, Home Depot, Sears, or Sam's Club. Maybe start with a ready-made workbench as the core of your workshop, and build the remaining ...


9

They are the remnants from the rivets used to hold the pieces of steel together. Each rivet contains a piece that holds the metal together and a piece that looks similar to a finish nail. When the "nail like" piece is pulled by the riveting tool it distorts the head then breaks off. Pop Rivet set tool grips shank, draws ball head up through tube rivet to ...


9

The type of shelf pins shown in your photo are able to twist out of crappy MDF or particle board side walls when a lot of torque is placed on the pin due to excessive weight placed upon the shelf. There are alternate types of shelf bracket pins that are designed to keep the pin at 90 degrees to the side wall thus keeping it from torquing out of the hole. ...


9

Push up on the pointy thing and pull on the drawer. see details here


8

You can get specialized cutters for that sort of thing, but you can do it without, all you need is a drill, hammer, and chisel. You drill 4 holes in the corners of the hole you want, at the depth you want, then chisel out the material in between. A workbench would be handy for this but you could do it on floor if you like. That is a load of work though, so ...


8

Absolutely, install backers. I prefer 2X6 backers. This will make your life so much easier when you install your cabinets.


8

I find it hard to believe that a few bottles would tear those pins out, unless either 1) the shelves are too short, resulting in a lot of torsional force, or 2) the pins weren't fully seated. Four pins, even in MDF, should support 100 lbs. easily. Custom and pre-built cabinets around the world use simple dowels for shelf support, even in particle board, and ...


8

Carpenters don't usually do custom cabinetry--it requires a special skillset and some specialized tools. Some do, of course, and if you find a high-caliber handyperson he or she could probably get the job done. A better bet is probably a local custom cabinet shop. They'll have the tooling required to match your design, edge profile, etc., and they'll be ...


8

In the UK at least your cabinets will all be screwed into the underside of your kitchen worktop (except stone worktops which will be glued down with silicone), and also all screwed to each other, so they will all be rigidly connected together anyway. Cabinets may also have utilities such as gas and electric services passing through them. For this reason ...


7

Ok serious answer. If in fact they are urethane, start with Dawn. If that isn't quite strong enough, step up to Barkeeper's Friend powdered cleaner. It will clean and polish most anything and not scratch the urethane finish.


7

I would use a pocket screw joint. It is generally considered to be a stronger joint, and you can remove the clamps immediately after driving the screws (as opposed to waiting until the glue sets). Along with the strength and speed, it also makes the construction process easier. You don't have to drill 2 separate holes, and then attempt to get the ...


7

Just to stop the ugliness, I would just get a can of Rust-Oleum gloss enamel (black, white, whatever), then remove the hinges from the cabinets. Clean them thoroughly, and if there's any existing lacquer or hardcoat, try roughing them up with a bit of steel wool. If you can completely disassemble each hinge, that would be ideal; otherwise, work a small ...


7

Yes you can do this. You need a hinge cutter: For best effect, use with a drill press if at all possible. You can accurately set the depth of cut and keep it perpendicular to the panel. As long as the material you are using for the door is thick enough at the location where you need to place the hinge.


7

While having all four mount points connect to structure (aka: the stud) is ideal, I think in your case, having two mount points in wood and two in a drywall anchor, you're going to be ok. Consider this question: What is the weight capacity of a drywall screw? One drywall screw CAN (not should) hold a lot of weight for its size. Also a properly installed ...


7

If you have access to the inside of the cabinet you could replace the wood screw with T-nut and a machine screw. You would need to drill the hole to fit the T-nut and place the T-nut on the inside of the cabinet. Again, this only works if you have access to both sides of the cabinet wall.


7

Whether you use a table saw or a circular saw, precision isn't based on the tool but on how you control the tool. With a circular saw, as long as your measurements are precise, you can get precision, if you can control the saw well. To that end, a track saw is a GREAT help. It can ensure your long cuts on lines are perfect (if your line is perfect, of ...


7

While I can't speak to the quality of all manufacturers blades, in general the blade that comes with the saw is of no lower quality than any other blade offered by the manufacturer. Most miter saws come with a 24 tooth FTG (Flat Top Grind) blade, which is good for fast course cuts. If you're looking to chop 2x lumber, this blade will work fine for you. If ...


7

It will be best to replace any doors where the plastic laminate has been burnt, distorted or partially melted.


7

Sorry I don't have enough points to comment yet so have to put this reply in the answer. I had a vent coming out under the cabinets in the kitchen of my house for 20 years with NO PROBLEM (i.e. at the floor level where the kick-plate is). This wasn't even ductwork under the cabinet, but rather the vent exhausted into the frame under the cabinets, which ...


7

Nonsense... there's no way the output from the AC will damage a modern cabinet. The carcass of the cabinet is undoubtedly plywood or MDF which is plenty dimensionally stable. If you're still worried, add louvers and point the exhaust away from the cabinets, but I wouldn't give it a second thought.


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