54

This is exactly the purpose of a basin wrench Here's a picture from familyhandyman.com that shows a basin wrench in action: Note that as mentioned in another answer, you usually don't need to remove the faucet to replace the washers; but if you do need to remove the faucet for whatever reason - this is the tool.


49

I would not mount the latch to the door skin. Even if you can attach it well, chances are you'll pull the skin off the door over time. It's not designed to withstand that sort of stress. Instead, use long bolts with acorn nuts to sandwich the two sides to the door, or use coupling nuts and bolts from both sides. The latter requires larger holes through the ...


37

Maybe I'm missing something here but why are you trying to take off those nuts? The washers for the valves are topside. You just have to remove the valve stems to expose and change the washers. If you wanted to replace the faucet, then you'd need to get these nuts off.


32

In the Netherlands (and other parts of Europe) we use a 'patentbout' for this situation. The holes are through the entire door and line up with the shields.


26

Looks like a run-of-the-mill landscape stake to me. They're used for securing plastic edging, fabric, etc. Could also be a tent peg. It's a horse apiece. I'd give it a few taps with a hammer to loosen it, then try prying it out with a spade or the hammer with a block under it.


20

(so far, other answers don't show something I'd use on a 2x4, hence this answer) Two of these can go around a 2x4, then bolts run through the holes ... Is there a common application where these appear? "Straight Timber Connector" - for non-structural connections such as landscaping. Smaller versions are usually called mending plates in my part of the ...


14

In the USA, this has been known as a mending plate for as long as I can recall. I might have learned about the terminology in shop class, it's that old: A quick google search using those terms results in far too many links to list. Stainless steel, brass, zinc plated steel, probably even copper, although the latter would be a terminal jumper rather than a ...


14

Nylon is self-lubricating. Even when tight it's very slippery against itself. You'll need to increase friction. It may seem counter-intuitive, but you could apply some PTFE (Teflon) plumbing tape to the bolt threads. Even though PTFE is used as a lubricant, it'll thicken the thread diameter and create resistance to movement. Wrap 3-5 layers on the threads ...


14

While difficult to tell for sure I think it is an E-Z Lok threaded insert. It consists of a course threaded screw that is inserted into the wood. A pilot hole is drilled and the insert is screwed in with a Allen wrench until it is flush. The center of the insert is tapped for a machine screw. The advantage of this fastener is it can be disassembled numerous ...


14

Most municipalities and counties maintain a central resource of buried utility line locations. Here in New England it's telephone 888-DIG-SAFE. In most of the U.S. you can start with telephone 811. They probably do not know exactly where the lines run onto your property, but they will tell you what to look for, and if that stake is one of theirs.


13

You could install a few of these three prong tee nuts on the back of your board before it's attached to your studs and then bolt the inverter from the front. I'm curious why you'd "feel better" with two bolts instead of four.


12

I wish comments would allow pictures, but what you have is something generically called a "push on fastener" I have to disagree with jsotola, I consider them "barely reusable", they often break when when removing, esp. if old. I wouldn't count on being able to re-use it. I attached a pic of something what I think is close to what you ...


12

What's in the photo is painted. Any pipe you use will require surface preparation for paint to last a long time and not chip off easily. Galvanized pipe will require either the galvanizing to be removed chemically or by harsh mechanical removal... or you can leave galvanized stuff outdoors for a year, and it will gain a zinc oxide layer paint will stick to. ...


12

Find someone with a drill press and a 3/8-16 tap. Take a cube of steel, drill holes in adjacent faces, and tap them for the thread size.


11

I have no idea why, but an open coupling for a lamp is called a hickey... As in 1/4" IPS Brass Hickey: I've also seen this sold on some sites as an "open cast coupling" or "open cast hickey".


11

Pipe thread and screw thread are different even if you could find the right size elbow. What you might have to do is take a threaded coupler or two and have them welded together. I've never seen a threaded 90 like that, but it might exist for some specialized purpose.


9

It is called a shoulder bolt. You will probably need to try a specialized hardware supplier. In the US, Fastenal or McMaster-Carr come to mind as far as national outfits. With this type of hardware, it is sometimes so specialized to the item it came off of, it could be easier to just locate the manufacturer and model of the scooter. You could then first ...


8

I've typically just seen that called metal strapping or steel strapping. Home depot sells a similar thing in their ventilation accessories section, and they call it 'perforated metal hanger straps': https://www.homedepot.com/p/Master-Flow-Perforated-Metal-Hanger-Straps-3-4HS/100396917 Most metal strapping I've seen has straight sides, instead of wavy ones ...


8

The black iron ( carbon steel ) pipe comes with "mill varnish". I have never seen an ASTM specification for it. I understand it can be anything a mill wants . Very long ago it was probably creosote from coke ovens. You just need to try things like naphtha, paint thinner, etc to see what works. When oil companies purchase pipeline pipe, they order ...


7

That's called peening (Wiki). TFD – peen, v.t. : 2. to enlarge, straighten, or smooth with a peen. I would like to know how to go about [peening] over the end of the stick tang onto the material at the very end of the handle. –britishblades.com (quote edited for misspelling)


7

It's a countersink style bolt or screw that comes with the ubiquitous Swedish "assemble-it-yourself" furniture and now some knock-off Ikea copycat furniture. If you look in the fastener section of your Big Box hardware store it will be with other fasteners labeled "furniture fasteners"; often sold in little packages, sometimes in the "specialty fastener" ...


7

maybe use some unistrut instead of wood.


7

One approach that might work is to use an angle bracket at each corner, held to the threaded rod with two 3/8" nuts on each end.


6

From surfing a bit, it seems Baldwin has a variety of handlesets that work with a limited number of their locksets. If you can't buy just the plate, you might only need to buy the lockset. It seems to be called a 'Landing Plate' http://www.electronicsweekly.com/made-by-monkeys/materialsmaterials-processing/view-image-youll-2009-01/ We’ve had two ...


6

It's not going to have a standard name. It performs different roles in different applications, where it receives semantic names. It's just a bar or strap that's bored for fasteners. For example, here it's a bracelet blank: And here it's a separator bar:


6

Those are just metal "caps" that push into the screw heads.. The screws are located under those metal "pins" The metal pins are actually screws that have metal caps pushed into them so they look like you can't unscrew them. Take a very sharp small screw driver and pry under those caps and they will pop off revealing the screw head. See here: https://www....


6

Possibly Appliance shipping locks. Probably for a washer or dryer. Keeps the vulnerable internal parts from banging around during shipment (for instance, the washer drum). Usually are just thrown away after installation.


6

It is likely that the plastic nut (or bolt it screws to) is stripped. It may feel like it is tightening, but works loose because the threads are damaged. You should grab a set of replacement toilet seat bolts at the plumbing shop, they are (fairly) universal and come in a set of two. You do need to tighten rather firmly, but it is easy to damage plastic ...


6

Highly unlikely that a Grade 5 bolt (90.000 psi yield, depending on size) would be galvanized. If electro-galvanizing were used there is a high risk of hydrogen cracking at that hardness level. If it were hot dip galvanized, the required temperature of about 800 F would temper the steel to a lower strength. This tempering affect can be fixed using alloy like ...


6

I usually remove both of the supply pipes then make a socket to fit from a suitable sized metal pipe. Even found a copper pipe hammered on was sufficient in some cases.


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