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You need to learn the marvelous world of low voltage LED strips Seriously. You get a common 12 volt UL-listed power supply, and a small junction box to splice, and the world is your oyster. The strips price out at about $7 for 16 feet no kidding. Not $7/foot, more like 43 cents a foot. Since you're working entirely in low voltage, you're at ...


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You need 2 x 2-gang 2-way and 1 x 1-gang 2-way A faceplate with two switches on is two-gang. Note that 1-gang 1-way switches are also available, slightly cheaper; this will not work in your application. Switches that can be wired to operate from two locations is a 2-way. (This is UK terminology. USA terminology is different.) http://wiki.diyfaq.org....


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The cable in the wall have to be physically removed all the way to the other end, or if that is impracticable, as much as possible of both ends of the cables must be removed. It must be beyond any possibility of anyone ever energizing those wires again. If there are multiple cables in the wall, then I mean both ends of each cable, including the far ends ...


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The 2 blacks From the switch go to the red and orange. Doesn’t matter clip the reds straighten and use a wire nut to combine the 3 wires. Then black to orange with a wire nut. The white on the switch goes to that group of whites If you have a white on the switch, last the green to the ground or bare copper. That it was a 3 way doesn’t matter if the other ...


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If all you want to do is disconnect the switch A and put a blank in it's place then remove the wires from the switch and connect the yellow wire to either orange, and cap off the extra orange. If that makes switch B upside down then swap the oranges at switch A location. If you intend on eliminating the junction box for switch B or eliminating the conduit ...


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Turn off all power before starting any work. OK switch B can remain in place but you have to determine which of the two orange travelers is hot when switch B is in the top (ON) position, then disconnect and tape the other orange wire. Remove switch A and wire nut the yellow wire to the hot orange that you did not disconnect from the other switch. Tape the ...


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You could decide to disconnect all the wiring into & out of the unused box and run fresh wire directly to the active light fixture from the existing switch. Expensive(r), but then no need to retain either the box or access to it. In fact, if you're lucky, the fixture you're removing will be at the end of the run, so simply disconnecting the wires ...


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Make sure the light bulb is good. Measure voltage across those 2 wires. Does it read full line voltage? Remove all the light bulbs. Does the voltage change? (It might be "phantom voltage"). If the voltage is there with the bulb in, and gone/diminished to phantom when the bulb is out, then it probably is a switch to the bulb. The next test is to ...


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Can’t do it The unusual wire colors mean one thing: this house has conduit for its wiring. That would only happen if your jurisdiction requires it. It’s rather unfortunate. If you had spent hours watching Youtube videos on extending circuits with metal conduit, you’d be eager to get into what happens next. Sadly you watched videos on extending circuits ...


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It's capacitive coupling between the wires between the two switches, this allows a small amount of electric current to make a side-run around the open switch contacts. This small current is enough to cause some CFLs to flash periodically and some LED fixtures to glow dimly. and to trigger non-contact voltage detectors. It can be cured by adding a lighting ...


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Can’t do it. There’s a “Great Wall of China” between the left switch (and its cables) and the right switch. You cannot cross that with any wire, except safety ground. It’s a Code violation, it’s a safety hazard to workmen working on the left circuit... and what’s more, if there are any GFCIs or AFCIs in either circuit, it will trip them. What you might be ...


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It does seem like the center top cable in your diagram supplies the light fixture, and that the cable at switch 2 is a loop. If that's the case there's no way to reconfigure connections and maintain switching at switch 2 without adding a conductor.


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You're getting electro-magnetic transmission between the two travelers (A and B in your diagram). This is common and is more apparent with LED lights and highly sensitive multi-meters which will react to low level or phantom voltage. Nothing to be concerned about but if the low level glow bothers you you might want to switch back to the CFL.


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I'd venture it is poor wording by a low cost bottom feeder supplier in China that has no clue what they are talking about... Assuming by your use of the term "GFCI" that you are in the US or Canada (you didn't identify), to be able to use electrical equipment with 2 wire plugs, they must be "double insulated" and the plug itself must have a tag on it or a ...


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The switch is a switch leg , connect a switch to the 2 wires and it will provide the power to the fixture, use caution because with switches prior to the last code change it is quite common to have a switch leg and the white is always hot, the black is the switched hot, it is this way so you don’t think the white is a neutral. Since there were 2 wires only ...


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Because if an appliance trips the GFCI breaker, there go the lights The issue with having your whole shed on a GFCI consists of two parts: some things (power tools, hot things) can pose a stored-energy hazard after shutdown for a little while tripping the GFCI breaker will plunge you into the dark as the lights will have to be on it as well Being in the ...


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In my opinion, the GFCI Breaker offers the highest degree of safety. The point of GFCI is to protect any user in areas that can become wet. In the event you decide the lighting is not adequate and decide to replace the light with a droplight, anything plugged into the droplight would not be protected if the convenience outlet is the only protected supply. ...


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In my area, a few years ago, I ran a conduit in a trench to an outbuilding and didn't get the trench quite deep enough for the inspector, so he wanted GFCI protection in the panel supplying the run. I think it was about 14" deep. Your situation sounds pretty simple. Will this be inspected? But if not, you sound as if you want to do this according to ...


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My approach (which may not be your approach) is to use relays in parallel - so the motion sensor switches a relay that switches the lights, and the switch switches a relay that switches the lights (though the switch, if adequately "dumb" could just switch the lights directly.) The reason I do this is that the motion sensor circuitry may not like ...


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I have hooked up motion lights and used a 12/3 wire the normal black feeder conductor to the hot black for the sensor and the red feeder to the red of the light using a 3 way switch with the switch in 1 position the black is fed in the other position the lights are on. At first to turn this off I had to use the breaker. I later replaced the single 3 way ...


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Copied from my comment as an answer: I took off the working closet light and it is a black/white wire going to the fixture. I traced this wire back to the ceiling box and the black wire goes to #4, white goes to #1. Red wire in #1 is always hot, black wires in #4 are hot when the light is on. Wired my fixture the same as the wire to the closet light - black ...


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