20

Infinite time. Your 12 amp vacuum cleaner is probably labeled according to the maximum current it can draw (to be sure, look at its electrical specifications rather than the big marketing label some manufacturers put on the front to make the vacuum sound powerful). It is unlikely that it was actually drawing 12 amps at that particular time. If it was ...


12

I find it interesting that you looked up the breaker rating on Waytek’s Table but did not use an amp meter to verify your true amperage usage on the circuit. Many appliance makers advertise the amperage or horsepower of a device because they believe it attracts buyers. Yet we have constantly found that their advertising doesn't hold up. Try to simulate ...


8

15 amperes or 20 amperes on a typical circuit is not a magic critical number. The wires (14 AWG or 12 AWG) can actually carry far more current. The concern is heat. The electrical code is based on an understanding of how much heat, for how long, actually poses a problem. While you should not push the limits, an occasional overage is built in which is why the ...


6

No! The wire is (almost certainly) only rated for 20A. If the breaker is tripping because more than 20A is flowing, then uprating the breaker will mean more than 20A flows through the wires, your wires heat up, and your house burns down. (If the breaker is tripping because it's a GFCI breaker and there is a ground fault, then a 30A GFCI breaker will also ...


5

The middle image clearly shows a nut at the bottom of the recess or hole. Get some deep thin wall sockets and it should come undone easily. Or undo the flathead screws and make the wires safe then break the base. Then remove or grind down the threads...


5

Some good points already: But significant numbers of breakers in recent production are failing to meet the standard trip on 130% of rated current. The Federal stablok and their chinese knockoffs are the worst. https://inspectapedia.com/electric/Circuit_Breaker_Failures.php


4

Yes, that will cut energy use in half, though the type of bulb (LED, CFL, incandescent, one that's not invented yet) does not matter. Of course, you also get half the light. A bulb which is removed does not use any electricity whether or not the fixture is switched on (James Thurber's Grandmother notwithstanding, for the literarily inclined.)


4

Look for a switch with a yellow wire that doesn't seem to control anything. That will become the switch for the light fixture. Connect your light fixture green to green, white to white, and fixture black to ceiling yellow.


4

You're going to need a deep socket or maybe a needle nosed pliers.


3

20 AWG is rated for 5 amps, so it's good for taking any strip as far as you ought to. I prefer 22 AWG or 0.25 mm2, and stranded wire. The reason is, if the wires are any thicker, they will tend to "wag the dog", pulling the LED strip out of shape/position and potentially tearing off the solder pad. The "0.75" on the output terminals is surely not a ...


3

Either remove the wires entirely, or if it is impossible to do so, remove as much of the cables at most ends obliterate the cables at both ends so they are entirely orphaned in the wall. Don't get your cables mixed up! Then, remove the old junction box entirely. Gone.


3

You will need to bypass the ballast! Failing to do so will fry the LED. Corncob LEDs are always a bad idea. They are inefficient. They intentionally defeat the best characteristic of LED -- that they make a wedge of light, which is what you really want. Look around at lights. You have wallpack lights painting a super bright spot on the wall (useless), ...


3

There are two likely possibilities here, and one a little more unusual: Regular Switch If this is a regular, single switch controlling the light, then it will typically have embossed on it "ON" and "OFF" indicators. If it does, and the operation seems to be opposite of what those indicate then I don't know what is going on. But if has those and they are ...


2

Are they salvageable at all? Have I just ruined two otherwise perfectly good LED lights? No, they are not salvageable. Yes, you have just ruined two otherwise perfectly good LED lights. Dimming, with a non-LED compatible dimmer or with non-dimmable LED lights, is not good for the lights. Dimming is not normally, as much as it might appear (and as I used ...


2

It appears Allen & Roth is a "house brand" of Lowes, meaning Lowes buyers visit Shenzhen and go around to Chinese makers and wheel and deal to get things like this made as a limited run. However in their defense, they make the manufacturer build to US safety standards and secure a UL listing ETL listing for the item. Because US retailers are required to ...


2

I've had the same problem and I don't like buying a new sensor for want of a $0.01 piece of plastic. Yes, I've found that a piece cut from a milk jug seems to work perfectly for me.


2

Can't do it Here's the problem. Your original installation only has the two wires, even though it controls both light and fan. This means the original switch was not a plain switch. It was a complex beast, which multiplexed both fan and light control onto those two wires. It can be fairly guessed that it's having a conversation either with a smart fan,...


2

Unbeknownst to you, this is a 3-way switch. There is another switch in another location which also controls the light. At some point, the other switch got thrown. Now, your switch operates upside down from the way it did before. You can confirm this by looking for the word "Off" and "On" on the toggle itself. If you don't see any, that's a 3-way ...


2

If I am correct, Waytek supplies automotive breakers. Mains breakers are quite different. They have a magnetic (instant) trip for extreme overloads. And a thermal trip for lesser overloads. The thermal trip mode is to protect the wires from melting. The thermal trip must trip (eventually) at 135% of rating, in order to get a UL listing. Also, thermal ...


1

Regarding running costs, at a price of 11.5 cents a kilowatt hour a 1 Watt bulb left on all year would cost $1.00. So assuming you only have the light on when its dark, say an average 8 hours a day throughout the year then removing the 3 LED bulbs would save you about $5.


1

You're saying "last one", but that has two meanings. First as position: the last one in the row. Second as time: the last one remaining. The second meaning is relevant here. What's actually the case is all 4 sockets are wired the same. What's causing the problem is removing the last (final) incandescent. It wouldn't matter if you removed it from ...


1

Wow, this is a tangle. Here's what's really going on here. There are 2 lights! Your photo doesn't document which (non-visible) terminal on the 3-way is common. But we can figure it out for 2 reasons: a) we can see one traveler, and both travelers are always in the same cable. And b) the upper right has 2 wires, and there would be no earthly reason for ...


1

You have an open neutral somewhere in the line From the meter readings you took with the breaker off, namely no continuity between any pair of wires, even neutral to ground which should have a low resistance between them since they are connected at the main panel, as well as the neutral "ringing" as hot with a non-contact voltage detector, it sounds like ...


1

I invite other answers, but since you mention cove lighting specifically, there are slim transformers that are made to be easy to hide like this model: Armacost 12v LED Driver transformer To use this, you could have a 120v standard electrical box behind the molding where the NM cable would exit the wall and attach to the transformer. I'm not sure exactly ...


1

Since your yellow wire was not stripped it is probably your switched hot and this being an extra light fixture I would pull the light black wire off the connection to the other blacks and connect the lights black wire to the un-used yellow, this will probably give you control of the new light and probably an existing one that’s how I would have done a spec ...


1

The "PS" in your lamp part number means "Pulse Start", which is the way in which the Metal Halide bulb is initially excited to begin putting out light. That means it most certainly has a ballast in the fixture. So to use your LED replacement, someone will need to remove the ballast and run the wires directly to your mogul base socket (you can leave the old ...


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