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8

You have a "single-pole" arrangement, i.e. one switch controlling the load (the light). You simply need to turn off the circuit breaker controlling this circuit, remove the two wires from your existing dimmer switch and place them on the two wire terminals on the new dimmer switch (the terminals that are NOT green). It does not matter which wire goes to ...


8

DON'T try random stuff when you get stuck Trying to replace actual knowledge with "throw things at the wall and see what sticks" is a fatal error when dealing with electrical equipment. Why? The entire strategy is based on stopping when you find "the" combination that works. Actually, many combinations will work and also kill you. The only way to avoid ...


5

Based on the instructions and Single Pole installation (i.e., one switch rather than 2 switches), this should be quite simple: Line - Hot This is one of your black wires. Hard to tell from the old dimmer *and it may not have made any difference on the old dimmer which wire was hot and which wire was switched hot. It might not matter on the dimmer, but you ...


2

I count 6 wires in the box - I have circled the extra black which immediately diverts out of frame. Anyway, this connects like a normal switch: Pigtail a ground to the switch then all grounds together under the same wirenut If the switch needs a neutral, pigtail it, then all neutrals together Each of the two remaining black wires to the switch


2

Based on your wiring color and photo, I'm going to assume this is an older house in the US. First a few things. Sometimes there are wires in a box that just pass through and go somewhere else, so all the wires might not be used by the switches or outlets in a given box. It's not unusual to have 5 wires in a switch box. Also, the ground wire is there for ...


2

There are two conduit factors: Thermal derate Yes, overheating is an issue, but the limitations don't really start to pinch until you have more than four circuits. Generally in a split-phase system, the rule of thumb is 2 wires per circuit (a circuit being something powered from one breaker where all handle(s) throw together) ... unless for some reason ...


2

Your control systems are incompatible This is one we see all the time. People try to dim their remote controlled fan. Or a timer with a motion sensor. Or get their modern era smart switch to play nice with a series dimmer in 3-way mode. Bottom line: one thing must control the light. One thing. It must be the master of the light. And then, other ...


1

Great pics Looks like a bad splice to switch. Or the guy that wired house had his own way of doing it.Most of the time ,black and red are used as travelers White as load out. It seems to be a dead end 3 way splice. The one box with the problem may be, the one with the 3 wires.White to black screw, red black on brass as travelers.White wire should be made a ...


1

If none of the above is fixing the issue... it will most likely be inrush current. Drivers for LED lights have a very high instantaneous inrush current at start up. A 6a RCBO will not cope well as it it a very low amperage. Try take half out and see what happens


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