19

The wattage limit on a light fitting is related to the amount of heat generated by a tungsten bulb of that wattage. Putting a 60W bulb in a 40W or 25W fitting is definitely not recommended. However, your choices are both LED bulbs, which a) run cold & b) use a small fraction of the rated power. They give tungsten bulb wattage equivalents as people ...


7

You can't - without some active component or spare poles on the switches. If you have spare poles on your switches, simply connect all three switches in parallel and to the 4. light. If you don't, you'll have to either change switches, or install a relay in parallel with each of the three light bulbs, and connect the output of those relays in parallel to ...


5

If you go from 3 to 4 or 9 or 10 watt LED bulbs in a fixture rated for 100W tungsten bulbs you will be fine. No LED bulb that fits the socket will overheat the fixture. However there is another consideration. If the fixture is closed, and especially if it has a small glass globe completely enclosing the bulb, you need to be careful when installing LED ...


4

As discussed in the comments, cove lighting is one alternative that lights the whole room from the edges instead of the center and without having a hanging chandelier (easily blocked if the ceiling is relatively low) and without using ordinary recessed lighting. I easily found a tutorial from Family Handyman which covers a lot of the issues involved. The ...


4

OK, based on some digging into the old and the new standard, and assuming I did the math right, here's what I think is the answer. TL;DR: The old A++ label roughly corresponds to the new A–E (and maybe F) labels, while old A+ corresponds to new E–G. Anything below A+ in the old system falls under G (least efficient) in the new system. The difficulty with ...


4

Your original switch was a 50 cent cheapie. It had both screw terminals and backstabs. In your photo, the "B" backstab is internally connected to the yellow screw. So the installer is using the dual connections to splice together "B" and "C", as well as connect them to that leg of the switch. It's very common to bring power (...


4

You're fine. The 2x35 watt max is the maximum heat, 3.4 btu's per watt, so your 4w bulb outputs about 14 btu's per hour each. Your fixture is rated for over 200 btu's of heat. It doesn't matter whether your watts come from LED's, tungsten, TV, coffee maker, or space heater. All put off 3412 btu's per kw/h. Watts are so directly connected to heat that some ...


3

Not gonna work. Electrical appliances don't run on voltage. They run on voltage difference. Here's a relevant example. Suppose your transformer puts out +6V and -6V (that is to say, opposite phases). The non-contact tester wouldn't detect anything at all. But there would be 12V between the two wires which is exactly what the lights want. See, current flows ...


3

Golden rule - if all you're doing is changing a ceiling rose & unless you're reconfiguring/replacing the actual house cabling, all you should need to do is replace what you took out with the old light with the equivalent in the new light. The rest is untouched. Your wires all go in the other face of the terminal block, in the same holes as the old ones ...


3

It is just a guess, but something held vertically from the top and still be straight, doe not need to be thick at all. Now take the same piece of material used horizontally and it will potentially sag between supports. Thicker material will withstand sagging over a given distance, especially over time where gravity will deflect an item that may have been ...


3

Nobody runs 50A/120V circuits, because you get munched by voltage drop, and it's easier to run a 25A/240V circuit once you're into that much power. So a 50A circuit is 12,000 watts not 6000. "Outlet" does not mean receptacle. It means any point-of-use, plug-in or hardwired, which is not a subpanel. Code here is not really thinking about one giant ...


2

The light flashes on and off repeatedly. If your new light bulb is LED and the previous was incandescent, this is an indication that some part of the path from panel to bulb is not LED compatible. This can include: Smart Switches Dimmers Timers Motion Sensors Photocells Since you indicated that you may have photocells, that fits the nature of the problem. ...


2

I had the same exact problem and solved it with a wiremold box. Here is a picture after installation.


2

Use wiremold, put a box at the wall entry with a hole to match where the cable comes out of the wall, and a box at the fixture, also with holes lining up. Or, use EMT (smooth and easy to clean) which should be do-able with a fitting at the fixture and a box at the wall.


2

Glare when looking at a light source is proportional to its lumen output divided by its surface area. A small bright light like a GU10 bulb makes a lot of glare, because all the light is emitted by a tiny area, so that area appears extremely bright if you look directly into it. If you don't like glare, but want a decent amount of light, then: either you use ...


2

A canopy does what you want but I haven't seen one for an exterior wall mount, they are usually for interior ceiling mount. The box you have there should be an exterior one, not a plain metal one like that, it should be recessed in the wall and there should be a cable or conduit coming through the wall, entering the box, and attached to the entry hole. There ...


2

Don't cut any wires - you don't have enough wire length remaining. If you needed additional wire to make pigtails, it's time to buy some wire. You can use any binding technique that is Code certified, however, if you're new to all this, I'd stick to the Wago 773 or Ideal In-Sure push-in type connectors as you're using now. Even better, the Wago 221 family ...


1

Can I put the 4.1A Shelly into the circuit Not in North America. Anything that goes into AC mains electrical equipment there needs to be certified by an independent Recognized Testing Lab such as Underwriter's Laboratories (UL) or ETL as to its safety. This assures that it's built not to start fires, e.g. proper PCB design, quality components, plastics ...


1

This is a common demand in "flats" - buildings with one common entryway serving 2-4 apartments. Each flat wants a switch which operates both its private stairway and a light in the shared entry way. The common answer is to use light fixtures which contain 3 bulbs, with the fixture designed so each bulb gets its own live and neutral wire. This ...


1

This is a case for re-marking wire colors to indicate function There's a lot of subtle stuff going on here, along with a blatant mis-wiring/Code violation regarding wire markings. However, this thing would be dog-simple if you could just visualize it. I'm a huge fan of using wire colors for that, and the key to that is using colored electrical tape to re-...


1

You can't "split cables". All wiring must be grouped (minimum pair hot/neutral or switched hot/neutral, but sometimes three = hot/travelers or switched hot/travelers etc.). This isn't just to keep track of things, though it does help with that. It is because of the way electricity (alternating current) works. The end result is either cables (2 or 3 ...


1

Since you appear to have 2 cables rather than 3 (3 would be incoming power, light fixture, dining room), you likely had something like the following: Power goes first to kitchen light - black hot, white neutral At kitchen light, black incoming to black 3-wire cable, whites together (and to fixture neutral), red of 3-wire cable to fixture hot (aka switched-...


1

Actually, flush mount means the fixture is in the ceiling--flush means "on the same plane as". Otherwise it's surface mount. (Marketing departments use the term to sound clever when they should say "surface mount".) Image source Examples of flush mounting are recessed cannisters and undercabinet lighting. So, "semi-flush mount"...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible