30

Pretty easy DIY job. All you'll need is: a hammer, old metal putty knife, utility knife, small pry bar, pliers, and a pencil. For reinstallation, a finish nail gun really makes the job go fast, and a nail set is also useful. The typical procedure: Cut away any caulk on the top edge and corners. Check any inside corners to see if they are coped rather than ...


24

Drywall should definitely not touch concrete as moisture will wick (ie flow up the surface as in a candle/lamp wick) into the drywall and encourage mold growth. 3/8" should be sufficient - your prop up plan is not only appropriate, but a common technique used by drywallers.


21

Yes, reversing them would be a bad thing. The cold water should be entering the bottom of the tank, the hot output at the top: I'd insist that the plumber fix this. But if they won't, I'd suggest picking up a pipe cutter, some sharkbite connectors, and just fix it yourself. Shouldn't take more than a half hour to do so.


20

1/2" give or take is fine, just be sure there's no direct contact that can wick up moisture. The trim will cover any gaps, so it's not critical that these are even. Note that drywall on the wall should support the ceiling drywall, meaning you install the ceiling first, and the wall is installed tight against the ceiling. For the bottom piece, you use a roll ...


18

I start by hand tightening as much as I can, then I tighten a little on each side and check if the toilet moves. If it does then I tighten a bit more, check and repeat until there's no movement. You're trying to avoid bowl movement, so that it doesn't shift or fall over, not to hold the floor up by the toilet bolts. As tight as you can go will probably ...


16

I use a painters multi tool to pry loose baseboards. Its wider and thickeer than a putty knife. It also has a hard place on the end of the handle where its meant to be tapped with a hammer. I find it pretty handy.


16

Nobody uses a pneumatic nailer for drywall. And in a world where shortcuts are revered, that has to tell you something. You know this already, but screws are the gold standard. They stay put and they pull the drywall as close to framing as possible. Badly set screws can pop, but properly set ones don't. Nails were common in the past, but they were usually ...


14

It's totally normal. Carpet comes on rolls in widths from 11'6" to 13'. They need to cut off a chunk of that roll to fit the room. It's the reason why if you're carpeting a 10x10' room, you can't buy 100sqft of carpet: they'll charge you for more like 120sqft (12' roll, 10' long). It also depends on the layout of the room, and where they put seams (if ...


14

Probably you have two or more phone jacks daisy-chained together. One cable goes to wherever the phone line enters the house and the other runs to another phone jack somewhere else in the house. This is a common practice. I did some pricing online, and it seems that Cat 5e is comparable in price to 4-conductor phone cable, so the builders may simply have ...


13

I would build a 2x4 (or 2x6, it's hard to tell the depth from this picture) frame to fit into the cubby hole, something like this: Spacing and attaching Space the studs 16" on center. You'll need to attach this securely to the rest of the walls. Assuming they're also wood, a few 3" #10 screws into either side would probably do the trick. Be sure to recess ...


12

While this will not directly answer your question, I'd like to offer an alternative solution. Modify Existing Molding If it were me. I'd get some transition molding, with a profile like this. I'd then set up my table saw to rip the piece, to remove the angle profile on the back edge. Which would give me a profile like this. Once I had my molding ripped ...


12

That's just.... nasty. The spout looks fine but the faucet is both too far out and not square. There's a large gap at the base that looks like it can leak water into the wall space. The "plumber" was either drunk, half-asleep or incompetent. There is no excuse for work that sloppy.


12

HD and Lowes to my knowledge do not have any contractors on staff. Meaning that they outsource all of their services to local contractors. Pros you get a warranty from a company you know will probably honor it in a year you can sometimes - not all the time - use their financing and may be able to have zero interest for a year if your credit is good ...


11

You can mount them vertically, but they have to be installed 4-12 inches (spacing usually on the instructions) from the ceiling. So it might be better to put in on the column than the beam, depending on how large that beam is. More information from FEMA


11

First, sit on your couch in the ideal viewing position (ie: where your butt imprint is). The bottom 1/3 of the TV should be at eye level when mounted. Everyone has an opinion about exact positioning, but this is more or less the general rule of thumb I've found from various sources, and it has always worked well for me. I find most people mount them too ...


11

No, it will not be OK. A fan blade system is meant to be balanced. Even when all of the original equipment blades are in place, minor imbalances can occur and need to be corrected with weights from a balance kit. Failure to have a balanced fan causes wobble. If the wobble is bad enough, it can damage the motor, loosen the fan in its mounting and even cause ...


10

The toilet flange needs to be on top of the finished floor. Meaning the bottom edge of the flange needs to be on the same plane as the toilet. So if your toilet sits on the tile, the flange needs to be on top of the tile too. The spacing of the toilet exit "horn" and sealing surface is designed for this height. almost all plumbers agree, here are some ...


10

You likely need flat, not level. And for that, all you really need is some sort of a long, straight edge. A yard stick works pretty well ... just place it down anywhere you think there might be a dip or bump, and if the yard stick is flat against the floor its whole length, you're fine. As for the implications of not having it flat, I'm not sure for ...


10

It's quite common for a rough in to be slightly off square. As long as you shim it properly and anchor it securely, there won't be a problem.


10

reasons going to the service entrance will be difficult: you'll have to open the meter box, and most meter boxes are tamper sealed by the electric company so you will have to involve them. the meter box lugs are probably not sized for multiple connections. this creates a potentially dangerous wiring setup. someone may assume that the main panel in the house ...


10

Rent a small excavator, perhaps including a person to operate it. A machine can do in hours what you would spend days (or weeks!) doing with two hands and one shovel.


9

The floor doesn't have to be completely flat as long as any bumps or hollows are relatively shallow (like rolling hills rather than mountain peaks and valleys). If there are gaps or ridges in the floor then this will create areas where the linoleum will wear more than the rest of the floor. This is because there will be movement of the linoleum where it can ...


9

For those interested, here's the process I ended up using: Measure, level and mark boards, appropriately aligning the future holes with the mortar between bricks. Drill pilot holes into the wood shutters, including a 1/4" countersink to cover the screw heads up with wood filler. What I learned at this step: Unlike screwing wood to wood, where you can sink ...


9

One thing that will help prevent the porcelain cracking is to use a rubber or plastic washer between the head of the bolt and the bowl. This will take some of the "excess" force by deforming slightly, and by checking for the washer deforming as you tighten you'll have an extra visual check that you've applied enough force.


9

Now you've learned the hard way, the same way the rest of us learned, why they say "measure twice." A spade bit may work for this trick, but an auger bit may be easier to control. First, use the bit to cut a hole in center of some scrap wood. A piece of plywood that's 4"x6" would work well, and a 2x4 that's 6-8" long would also work. You need a few inches ...


9

Contact your local building department, and ask them if this would require a permit, and if you can do the work yourself. That's the only way to know for sure, as different areas have different rules. You'll likely have to pay a small fee for the permit, and have the work inspected at different stages of the job (or maybe only once it's done). Most areas ...


9

With option 2 you have twice as much seam length running down the center of ceiling joists. This can be a real pain to keep everything aligned, especially when you have roof braces, overhead door brackets, and other structures holding the truss members rigidly in place. Also, some brands of drywall aren't designed to resist sag parallel to the mounting ...


8

If you look at the picture below you will see pex tubing. This has become the industry norm in some areas of the US - I know some countries have adopted similar things and some haven't. The compression fittings are supposedly made to last longer than than a soldered copper joints - jury is still out on that. Let's see what complaints there are in 10-20 ...


8

Back in the day when I used to put up vinyl siding, I found that the best way to cut it with a circular saw was with a cheap 140 tooth plywood blade installed backwards (to give the teeth a negative rake and prevent chipping): For really hard plastics, I've used a diamond abrasive blade before and that did a great job (these are incredibly expensive if we'...


8

A turn is 360 degrees. You are expected to put a mark on the thing you are turning, so you can observe its rotation. They have no way of knowing which kind of wrench you are using, what your wrenching style is, or what amount of swing angle local clearances will afford you. "Hand/finger tight" is the point at which all free lash/slop has been removed, ...


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