16

Nobody uses a pneumatic nailer for drywall. And in a world where shortcuts are revered, that has to tell you something. You know this already, but screws are the gold standard. They stay put and they pull the drywall as close to framing as possible. Badly set screws can pop, but properly set ones don't. Nails were common in the past, but they were usually ...


15

Probably you have two or more phone jacks daisy-chained together. One cable goes to wherever the phone line enters the house and the other runs to another phone jack somewhere else in the house. This is a common practice. I did some pricing online, and it seems that Cat 5e is comparable in price to 4-conductor phone cable, so the builders may simply have ...


13

I would build a 2x4 (or 2x6, it's hard to tell the depth from this picture) frame to fit into the cubby hole, something like this: Spacing and attaching Space the studs 16" on center. You'll need to attach this securely to the rest of the walls. Assuming they're also wood, a few 3" #10 screws into either side would probably do the trick. Be sure to recess ...


12

While this will not directly answer your question, I'd like to offer an alternative solution. Modify Existing Molding If it were me. I'd get some transition molding, with a profile like this. I'd then set up my table saw to rip the piece, to remove the angle profile on the back edge. Which would give me a profile like this. Once I had my molding ripped to ...


12

That's just.... nasty. The spout looks fine but the faucet is both too far out and not square. There's a large gap at the base that looks like it can leak water into the wall space. The "plumber" was either drunk, half-asleep or incompetent. There is no excuse for work that sloppy.


12

HD and Lowes to my knowledge do not have any contractors on staff. Meaning that they outsource all of their services to local contractors. Pros you get a warranty from a company you know will probably honor it in a year you can sometimes - not all the time - use their financing and may be able to have zero interest for a year if your credit is good ...


11

The toilet flange needs to be on top of the finished floor. Meaning the bottom edge of the flange needs to be on the same plane as the toilet. So if your toilet sits on the tile, the flange needs to be on top of the tile too. The spacing of the toilet exit "horn" and sealing surface is designed for this height. almost all plumbers agree, here are some ...


11

Having just done this, I'll report: doable, but a huge PITA. In order to get a good "fluff" on it, I ground it through expanded metal mesh (having tried a few other things which did not work as well first) - it's time consuming and dusty, but certainly possible if all you have to do is a bag/block or two. I've done one block, I might do another just to check ...


11

No, it will not be OK. A fan blade system is meant to be balanced. Even when all of the original equipment blades are in place, minor imbalances can occur and need to be corrected with weights from a balance kit. Failure to have a balanced fan causes wobble. If the wobble is bad enough, it can damage the motor, loosen the fan in its mounting and even cause ...


11

You can change it so it opens the opposite direction. I.E. Flip the door over and attach the hinges to the left side of the cabinet. You can remove door by removing the screw on each hinge that holds them to the cabinet frame. Once you have the door un-atached you can measure where the holes are, from top and bottom, on the right side and transfer those ...


9

Contact your local building department, and ask them if this would require a permit, and if you can do the work yourself. That's the only way to know for sure, as different areas have different rules. You'll likely have to pay a small fee for the permit, and have the work inspected at different stages of the job (or maybe only once it's done). Most areas ...


9

With option 2 you have twice as much seam length running down the center of ceiling joists. This can be a real pain to keep everything aligned, especially when you have roof braces, overhead door brackets, and other structures holding the truss members rigidly in place. Also, some brands of drywall aren't designed to resist sag parallel to the mounting ...


8

If you look at the picture below you will see pex tubing. This has become the industry norm in some areas of the US - I know some countries have adopted similar things and some haven't. The compression fittings are supposedly made to last longer than than a soldered copper joints - jury is still out on that. Let's see what complaints there are in 10-20 ...


8

Back in the day when I used to put up vinyl siding, I found that the best way to cut it with a circular saw was with a cheap 140 tooth plywood blade installed backwards (to give the teeth a negative rake and prevent chipping): For really hard plastics, I've used a diamond abrasive blade before and that did a great job (these are incredibly expensive if we'...


8

A turn is 360 degrees. You are expected to put a mark on the thing you are turning, so you can observe its rotation. They have no way of knowing which kind of wrench you are using, what your wrenching style is, or what amount of swing angle local clearances will afford you. "Hand/finger tight" is the point at which all free lash/slop has been removed, ...


8

This is a good idea, except 1/8" x 1/8" is kinda small. 5/32" would let you use common .160 spline. Check spline availability in your area prior to choosing groove size. Yes, "trying to use the circ saw on a vertical surface is a bit dodgy". You should remove the panels and lay them flat on sawhorses if possible. You should consider using a router, which ...


8

You have metal conduit connecting metal junction boxes. All of it is ground. The conduit, the boxes, all of it. This is the ideal system. Switches ground through the yokes and mounting screws. They don't need ground wires. Receptacles are not allowed to do that unless they yoke has hard clean flush metal-metal contact with the box, and yours won't ...


8

Vertical alignment is rarely an issue if you've installed your box level. There's not much play in the mounting holes of the devices. You can usually work a row of switches into a plate without a problem, for example. To get them horizontally aligned: Always start by centering the mounting screws in their slots. Make adjustments if necessary. Optionally ...


7

Looks to me like you have a GALANT leg. From IKEA's website The legs shall be fitted on to the frame before the table top is put in place. If you only have the table and legs, you may not have everything you need. Based on instructions found at the customer service site linked to by alt, you need to put the legs onto the frame bar piece, then put the ...


7

The cable you bought looks fine. You don't need STP (shielded twisted pair) wire. From what I've heard, it's mostly used in industrial environments with a lot of electrical interference issues. Won't really apply to residential environments. I don't think that's a drain wire since the cable is not shielded. That extra wire is not copper in the picture, so ...


7

Do NOT install expansion spaces between each board. You want a very tight fit between each board and then leave an expansion space around the perimeter of each room. First you’ll need to acclimate the wood to your house. This may vary by location and season, but generally the manufacturers recommend about 10 days. Second, seal the floor (again, according ...


6

I did an area above a garage using a mud (drywall) mixer on a drill and bent wire to fluff it up. For the few bales that I used, it worked well. I used a leaf rake to level it out. On flat ceilings with room to work it would be OK.


6

Measure the ceiling height every foot. It is likely there will be low and high points so you may want to split the difference between the counter and the ceiling (if you're not mounting to the ceiling. Uppers go in first, primarily because they're hard to install once the lowers are in. Install a ledgerboard to align and help install the uppers. Get long ...


6

Tooooonnnnsssss more cutting in option 2. Butt joints aren't a problem if you're careful with your screws so that you don't pop through or break the edge. I'd say option 1, imo.


6

The installation instructions you linked specifically say to "Apply a generous bead of polystyrene compatible adhesive" on the back wall studs first, then on the side panels. These installation instructions are the authoritative guide for how this product should be installed, so yes they should have been glued. Hopefully it's not too late to unscrew, add ...


6

According to Home Depot's website, they provide a year of warranty on anything that is done. Of course this has the added benefit that they're a huge company with the ability to cover any problem you may find yourself in. On that note, any reputable contractor will have insurance sufficient to cover any mishap that they cause and should also warrant their ...


6

I'll start by saying that I'm a big fan of following instructions. However, there are exceptions to rules sometimes. Let's assume for the sake of argument that you don't spend an inordinate amount of time in the closet with the boiler and the door closed. So risk of CO poisoning in there is pretty slim. Let's also assume that you spend time in the living ...


6

This is a really really poor installation. Everything will have to be pulled up. Tiles will need to be cleaned or thrown away and reinstall. Issues: The mortar/cement isn't even covering under the mesh in some pictures. To do this type of install you need to cement/mortar the mesh to the floor and a skim coat on top. Once this dries you can continue ...


6

Hopefully we can get you back on track he put the drywall flush to the floor. I know it needs to be off the ground 3/8 inch or so I tend to hang drywall from the top down for this reason. It sounds like he might have started from the bottom up and left them sitting on the floor. You're right about needing a gap from the floor (I use a super bar myself to ...


6

Don't look at device boxes, which are one gang, two gang, etc. Handy boxes are OK for a switch or etc. but not what I'd use here. I wouldn't want plastic faceplates for shop use, even though the nylon ones are pretty durable. You want 4x4 boxes and raised industrial covers The 4x4 (aka 4-square) boxes will have the holes where you want them. You can ...


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