Hot answers tagged

18

Looks like effloresence to me, which itself is not harmful, but possibly a symptom, mainly of water movement; I would check perimeter walls for further signs of water infiltration, and make sure water movement outside is properly being handled, i.e. gutters, grading.


12

You should cut away carpet. The cabinets will last longer than the carpet and will just be a mess when it's time to install new carpet. I'd want the cabinets secured directly to the floor, not through carpet/pad. When you pull up the carpet and baseboard, you'll see the tack strip. If you are careful, you can re-use it, but it is cheap to replace. You'...


9

If the pros couldn't do much, It sounds like the stain is there for good. Some suggestions: small throw rug/welcome mat. Just cover it up! bring in a pro to swap that bit of carpet with maybe something in a closet, or just a far corner. A good carpet pro should be able to seam it all back together. dye the entire carpet a shade or two darker. I know such ...


9

No, I would not recommend nailing through carpet. Whether or not you prefer to, cutting the carpet and pad and removing them (under the wall) is the only right way to do this job. Baseboards on top of carpet will look like baseboards on top of carpet. If that's not how the rest of the baseboards are done, they will indeed look "off;" especially in the ...


8

If your soon-to-be-landlord is already making unreasonable demands, I would reconsider your choice to rent with them. Minor carpet staining from traffic is considered to be "wear and tear" in most states, as well as scuffing of the walls and other things that result from simply living in a space. Unless you're a group of college kids (to which, I could ...


8

Technically, yes you can, but in reality the results might not be great: Carpet is measured and cut to fit a house's floorplan: individual pieces are cut from a carpet roll to fit around the tricky bits in your house (door openings, inside closets, etc.) and then taped and ironed together on site. Unless you have the exact same floorplan, you're going to ...


8

Start by contacting your local waste management provider, either by phone or on the web. They will be able to tell you if they'll take it, and how you need to prepare it. If they don't take it, they should be able to direct you to a local company who will. Every area is different. The best way to get a straight answer, is to go right to the source. ...


8

3/8-5/8" but most 1/2" Reasoning: you have padding and carpet. With a plush carpet and pad you might be at almost an inch or even over. you don't want the tuck to be so tight that it looks like the carpet is being smashed under the baseboards. The carpet should look like it is just flowing under. Note that most floors aren't exactly flat. So make sure ...


8

Efflorescence, salts rising to the surface due to presence of moisture. Common in cementitious materials where water is present. You can wash it away with mild HCL solution but the stains will remain. Not much to worry about here. On structural masonry over long periods of time there might be a concern as it could be indicative of structural integrity ...


7

From a comfort and water protection perspective, I think you'll find it beneficial to install a sub floor. I'd recommend one which allows for ventilation beneath it such as these 2x2 panels you can buy at Home Depot/Lowes Dricore This will give you a nice, warm "softer" surface to put your carpet pad on, and help protect from any condensation issues with ...


7

It is possible to replace a section of carpet if you have a piece that is large enough. To tell the truth you will be able to see the section in most cases, to see other splices look at the doorways that have carpet you can usually see a line, sometimes the “grain” of the carpet is wrong so it even shows worse. If you have a large enough pice and want to ...


6

You absolutely should (must) bind the edges. Many consumer rugs are cut to length from a roll stock and bound for sale. Binding the edge is how it transforms from a textile on a roll into a rug. You could do it yourself if you had the requisite equipment and sewing skills but I can't imagine it would be tremendously expensive to have done. You can find ...


6

Carpets usually expand over time. This is caused by the fabric, under felt and entire carpet construction to stretch, caused by people walking over it over extended periods of time. It does not usually stretch as much as you show in your pictures. Possibly this happened because the material is sensitive to moisture and caused it to become more elastic. ...


6

Rent a carpet cleaner and don't put in any detergent. Just use hot water.


6

The trade name for it is... wait for it... carpet tape. This is a roll of 4" Carpet Seam Tape courtesy of wholesaletape.com and while although: This pressure sensitive tape applies quick and easy without the need of a "step on" hot iron. Made of a 42lb natural kraft paper with a fiberglass and cotton reinforced scrim it can join most carpet and wood ...


6

My recommendation would be to terminate the carpet on the last riser. If you put in a threshold, yes you'll protect the end of the carpet, but you'll still have a lip for people to trip over and fall. Not fun. If your flooring has no terminal piece at the top of the stairs, you can certainly get pre-shaped "noses" with proper support built into the ...


6

I have used a combination of construction adhesive and concrete nails. Doing it by drilling and an insert or a concrete screw would be awesome but that is really going to take some time


5

Depending on when this happened you might be able to just use water, or soap and water. Before it cures, latex paint is water soluble (so the absolute best time to clean it up is before it dries at all). I've had good luck using a couple of sponges and warm water - one to apply fresh clean water to the paint, and the other to blot up dissolved paint/water. ...


5

I'll assume you're installing a door and jamb, if you aren't installing a jamb I'd hold off on the door until the carpet is installed so it's not in the way If you're installing the jamb I would do it before the carpet so the jamb can rest on the ground. If it has a threshold you'll have to install it before the carpet. I'd remove the door from the jamb and ...


5

I installed carpet with a professional for two years right out of college. I don't think you need to buy anything. You need to pry the lip of that transition piece up so you can get the carpet loose along the entire length, then stretch the carpet forward more with a knee kicker. You can hold the carpet in place with the kicker while you use a rubber ...


5

If it's not vacuuming out, the issue may be with your vacuum. Check that the bag isn't full and that the brush doesn't need to be lowered for your carpet style. If you're still having difficulty cleaning it, then I'd consider a carpet shampooing wet vac. They can be rented from a variety of stores and pull out a lot of dirt as they vacuum up the cleaning ...


5

No, that's not a very good idea for a few reasons. One is that if water is spilled and leaks through the cracks in the hardwood floor then the carpet will soak it up and do lots of bad stuff do the hardwood floor above it. And I'm not a concrete expert but I think concrete on top of carpet would not be a good idea either. And that would be way more work ...


5

Yes way too much labor. Use powder actuated fasteners and loads specific for concrete. I've removed the tack strips from concrete and this is what held them down. The fasteners were maybe 1" long. https://www.ramset.com/Portals/0/pdf/RamsetPdrFastener_LoadChart.pdf


5

Tack strip for concrete, plus construction adhesive They make tack strip with nails specifically for concrete. They're thicker and harder than what's in the usual stuff, but nowhere near as large as actual concrete (cut) nails. That said, in older concrete many of the nails will spall out and not hold. The few that do can be considered temporary if you ...


5

There are shims made for these situations. Have a look These are made by traxx. Ask at your local carpet shop or order on line If you take a look at the link you will see a variety of options including one shim that is 24” in the ramp from 0-1”. In my opinion this is a good fix for a transition like yours and is easy to walk across. You can of course ...


4

If the glue is still a bit tacky then first get a bag of flour and throw handfuls of it on the floor, sweep it around on the whole floor. That will make it much less messy to get up. Then get a 4-inch floor scraper with plenty of blades and go to town. Here is a picture of the scraper from Lowes. Although I would try to find one with a little longer handle. ...


4

I'm not sure if your question is, 'What am I likely to find under my carpet,' or 'What should I do after ripping up carpet?' If the question is the former, the answer is absolutely anything depending on the age and history of your house. I know people who have ripped up carpet to find concrete, wood floors, and in one case magnificent hardwood that polished ...


4

expect stains, smells, and possibly mastic/glue. If you're looking for an 'industrial loft' feel, clean it up the best you can and then just cover it with some high-end concrete/floor paint...or epoxy. It'll be rough, but practical. For a more finished looked, hire someone with a concrete grinder to grind off the bad top layer of glue, dog pee and what-...


4

One potential location is on the last rise on the stairs. This is depicted below on my crude diagram. Make the cut of the carpet right under the lip of the top of the 2nd floor. Use a piece of trim to hide the cut and make it finished. Other options include: Create a small carpet landing at the top. Take the carpet off all the stairs and make the stairs ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible