Hot answers tagged

23

Before. I have done both and you can certainly do it either way but it is easier (and cheaper) more sturdy to fasten and shim the bottom to the floor without carpet in the way and because of the carpet you may need to shim more. The only argument for doing it after is "I may hate these bookshelves in a few years and when I tear them down I don't want ...


18

Looks like effloresence to me, which itself is not harmful, but possibly a symptom, mainly of water movement; I would check perimeter walls for further signs of water infiltration, and make sure water movement outside is properly being handled, i.e. gutters, grading.


12

You should cut away carpet. The cabinets will last longer than the carpet and will just be a mess when it's time to install new carpet. I'd want the cabinets secured directly to the floor, not through carpet/pad. When you pull up the carpet and baseboard, you'll see the tack strip. If you are careful, you can re-use it, but it is cheap to replace. You'...


11

There are two main reasons: When you install planks there is a requirement that the ends of the plank must be within a certain distance of ends of other planks on adjacent rows. This means you probably cannot make your rows match perfectly even if the planking comes in a variety of sizes. So you will have some cut-off waste and for most planking, ...


9

No, I would not recommend nailing through carpet. Whether or not you prefer to, cutting the carpet and pad and removing them (under the wall) is the only right way to do this job. Baseboards on top of carpet will look like baseboards on top of carpet. If that's not how the rest of the baseboards are done, they will indeed look "off;" especially in the ...


8

Technically, yes you can, but in reality the results might not be great: Carpet is measured and cut to fit a house's floorplan: individual pieces are cut from a carpet roll to fit around the tricky bits in your house (door openings, inside closets, etc.) and then taped and ironed together on site. Unless you have the exact same floorplan, you're going to ...


8

Start by contacting your local waste management provider, either by phone or on the web. They will be able to tell you if they'll take it, and how you need to prepare it. If they don't take it, they should be able to direct you to a local company who will. Every area is different. The best way to get a straight answer, is to go right to the source. ...


8

3/8-5/8" but most 1/2" Reasoning: you have padding and carpet. With a plush carpet and pad you might be at almost an inch or even over. you don't want the tuck to be so tight that it looks like the carpet is being smashed under the baseboards. The carpet should look like it is just flowing under. Note that most floors aren't exactly flat. So make sure ...


8

Efflorescence, salts rising to the surface due to presence of moisture. Common in cementitious materials where water is present. You can wash it away with mild HCL solution but the stains will remain. Not much to worry about here. On structural masonry over long periods of time there might be a concern as it could be indicative of structural integrity ...


7

It is possible to replace a section of carpet if you have a piece that is large enough. To tell the truth you will be able to see the section in most cases, to see other splices look at the doorways that have carpet you can usually see a line, sometimes the “grain” of the carpet is wrong so it even shows worse. If you have a large enough pice and want to ...


6

Rent a carpet cleaner and don't put in any detergent. Just use hot water.


6

The trade name for it is... wait for it... carpet tape. This is a roll of 4" Carpet Seam Tape courtesy of wholesaletape.com and while although: This pressure sensitive tape applies quick and easy without the need of a "step on" hot iron. Made of a 42lb natural kraft paper with a fiberglass and cotton reinforced scrim it can join most carpet and wood ...


6

My recommendation would be to terminate the carpet on the last riser. If you put in a threshold, yes you'll protect the end of the carpet, but you'll still have a lip for people to trip over and fall. Not fun. If your flooring has no terminal piece at the top of the stairs, you can certainly get pre-shaped "noses" with proper support built into the ...


6

I have used a combination of construction adhesive and concrete nails. Doing it by drilling and an insert or a concrete screw would be awesome but that is really going to take some time


6

There is no reason if you get on your hands and knees that you cannot feel the grates or empty space. I would check all walls from 8-16" and press down with my hand. But even if you find them, what will you do? Also an easier way is to have Lowe's get their stupid installer out and lift up the carpet on all walls to make sure there are no vents ...


5

I installed carpet with a professional for two years right out of college. I don't think you need to buy anything. You need to pry the lip of that transition piece up so you can get the carpet loose along the entire length, then stretch the carpet forward more with a knee kicker. You can hold the carpet in place with the kicker while you use a rubber ...


5

If it's not vacuuming out, the issue may be with your vacuum. Check that the bag isn't full and that the brush doesn't need to be lowered for your carpet style. If you're still having difficulty cleaning it, then I'd consider a carpet shampooing wet vac. They can be rented from a variety of stores and pull out a lot of dirt as they vacuum up the cleaning ...


5

The tackless carpet strips installed on masonry surfaces have short evenly-spaced concrete nails on every strip. They are set in position and with a well placed hammer strike the point of the nail penetrates the concrete securing the strip tightly. Of course in the real world not every nail hit goes as planned. It's a good idea to have a few spares on hand ...


5

No, that's not a very good idea for a few reasons. One is that if water is spilled and leaks through the cracks in the hardwood floor then the carpet will soak it up and do lots of bad stuff do the hardwood floor above it. And I'm not a concrete expert but I think concrete on top of carpet would not be a good idea either. And that would be way more work ...


5

Yes, a skilled flooring installer can patch in carpet to repair damage. It needs to be oriented with respect to the "grain" and pattern-matched. Chances are you won't want to do that more than once or twice during the life of the carpet, since worn carpet tends to appear quite different from new carpet, diminishing the value of the repair. If you're a ...


5

Yes way too much labor. Use powder actuated fasteners and loads specific for concrete. I've removed the tack strips from concrete and this is what held them down. The fasteners were maybe 1" long. https://www.ramset.com/Portals/0/pdf/RamsetPdrFastener_LoadChart.pdf


5

Tack strip for concrete, plus construction adhesive They make tack strip with nails specifically for concrete. They're thicker and harder than what's in the usual stuff, but nowhere near as large as actual concrete (cut) nails. That said, in older concrete many of the nails will spall out and not hold. The few that do can be considered temporary if you ...


5

There are shims made for these situations. Have a look These are made by traxx. Ask at your local carpet shop or order on line If you take a look at the link you will see a variety of options including one shim that is 24” in the ramp from 0-1”. In my opinion this is a good fix for a transition like yours and is easy to walk across. You can of course ...


5

Urine (human and animal) contains ammonia, paricularly if it's left for a while, e.g. if you didn't notice it at first. Ammonia is used in carpet-cleaning products. In fact it's been used for stain-removal since Roman times. You might want to track down an ammonia-based carpet cleaner, but use it when you can open all the windows and sit outside for a bit ...


4

Simple floor scrapers like this one, pictured below have always done the job for me - they will take pretty much anything off a flat surface including splashed concrete.


4

As long as the add on is more than 1.5–2 inches wide, it will make a fine extension. Much narrower than that and the seaming iron and seaming glue will make a bit of a mess. Someone very experienced can probably manage it well enough though to make it turn out all right. The six inch piece will be invisible if professionally done. If you have any ...


4

They are what is know to me as "housed stringers" the sides, have notches cut into them to allow the treads to set in the notches. The small vertical pieces in the corners are wedges driven in with glue to snug everything up tight to reduce or eliminate squeaks. To remove the treads, you would need to cut out the treads, and install new ones... Not what you ...


4

Go up and over the door, and along the top of the wall. then down the wall to the computer. Use wiremold cable duct to make it neat. wiremold is a brand-name, I guess. Cable duct is more generic.


4

Carpet isn't paint. You can't infinitely cut and splice carpet and put a bunch of seams in it, and expect to have a surface that will wear well. So you can't understand the problem until you know the dimensions of each space and also the dimensions of the supplied carpet. It's just like if you buy cloth to make a pair of pants, and your waist is 44 ...


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