27

Gypsum and joint compound aren't combustible. It's not a problem. Clean it out if it bothers you. This has nothing to do with laziness. It has to do with efficiency of the process, which often looks like this: Framing carpenters or masons put up the walls Electricians "rough in" the conduit, boxes, and wiring Drywall hangers put up the sheets and ...


19

Using the hole(s) in the back is called a "back stab", and, while technically code-legal, they're frowned upon because they can come loose and cause arcing and, if left alone long enough, fires. The side screws are actually the preferred method and are applicable for either 12 or 14 gauge wire. However, the way you've done it is missing on 2 points:...


14

Those are just flakes of drywall compound. They are inert and not flammable. That quantity presents no problem at all. In the course of working in the boxes, you can clean them out, but I'd never deliberately open a box just to clean it.


14

As it is now, you can't. An outlet needs a hot and neutral(black and white) plus ground. Your switch only has a hot and a switch hot and maybe ground. To have an outlet there you need to add a cable from another source that has hot, neutral and ground.


10

Yes, I see several problems. Wire just stuck under a screw, and not using a proper shepherd's hook with a more than 180 degree bend (i.e. squeezing it together after forming it. Watch a Youtube video on how to put a wire on a screw. Insulation excessively stripped, leaving bare bits of wire sticking out beyond the back surface of the switch. Not OK. ...


6

Is feeding a 200A sub from a 200A main legit? Yes, and you don't even need another 200A breaker. The 200A breaker alread present in the panel will suffice, and so you can use a subfeed lug kit as DrSparks advises. For that matter, if the main breaker were out at the meter (e.g. a meter-main), you could simply "tee" off it with dual 4/0 to two main-...


5

I think you have already worked out the solution in your own mind. Good for you! 😆 If you're looking for an opinion on your conclusion, I would say that low voltage magnetic reed switch is your best option. This of course would require the use of a relay, but being a person who uses relays on a mundane daily basis, I would not consider such a solution to be ...


5

This is a common confusion for the novice. The part of the circuit you are interested in, is not the only part of the circuit. Obviously what you expect is 1 supply cable (always-hot and neutral) then fanning out into two lamp cables (always-hot and switched-hot). You do have that. But you also have hints of other stuff going on in the circuit. First, you ...


4

There's a good chance that there's only one hot coming into the box. It's wire nutted to a black wire that goes somewhere else as a hot,along with a neutral and ground, maybe to another room. The other two blacks in this group make both switches hot. In this case , all neutrals, white wires, would be connected together. Double breakers are normally used for ...


4

You mean 8/3 cables, which are going to have four individual wires in need of splicing. You can use extra-large wire nuts for the job. Another option is the ILSCO "MAC Block Connector". This is a lug connector, larger than an Alumiconn, far cheaper than a Polaris. Hard to find, but some box stores and many electrical supply houses will have it. (...


4

Plain breakers are an option for fewer and fewer circuits of late. However, here's something: if you have a 240V load that does not have a neutral (so we're talking water heater, air conditioner, EVSE etc.) you can take 2 singles and sandwich them into a 240V breaker, using a factory handle-tie. Again this does not work if the circuit is 240V with a neutral....


4

Yes it can and it is the best way to do it. Those holes in the back are commonly called backstabs and have a long history of failing. After you turn off the power, you can remove those wires by sticking a small screwdriver into the slot next to each hole and pulling the wire. You can also hold the wire and twist the switch back and forth while pulling the ...


4

The feeder needs to be correctly breakered at the supply end. That is 2 AWG (33.6 mm2) aluminum AA-8000 feeder. It is only good for 90 amps.* If the supply breaker is 100A, that's a common blunder due to misreading NEC. Change the breaker to 90A. Determining whether you have the amps to spare And adding a 20A to this subpanel is fine given that it's ...


4

From the added information in the comments, this 2-gang box is only 3-5/8" wide which is insufficient for the two modern outlets which are installed in the photo. Standard device boxes are 2" wide and this leaves plenty of room for a clean installation without resorting to hacks like tape. This old device box would be grandfathered and code ...


3

First, I would like you to consider using aluminum wiring instead of copper. The cost difference is staggering and there's no measurable disadvantage to using aluminum if it's installed properly. If you're dead set on copper, #3 THHN is fine. You'll need 1-1/4 SCH 80 PVC for areas exposed to damage. In particular, this is generally where the conduit exits ...


3

As far as GFCI requirements in a bathroom all bathroom receptacles have been required to be GFCI protected for many cycles NEC 210.8.A.1. currently AFCI’s are not required in bathrooms and I would suggest not getting a dual function device as AFCI technology is still not mature and there are problems, since my last job change I won’t be wiring homes anymore ...


3

The metal strip is a bonding strip between your neutral bus and your ground bus. You'll notice it isn't connected to your neutral bus which is correct for a sub panel but unfortunately, the grounds are connected to the neutral bus. You should move the copper grounds from the neutral bus over to the existing ground bus.You can splice some copper wire if the ...


3

The contactor is probably stuck closed. You should shut the breaker off immediately to prevent a fire. There's a high limit switch but that won't do any good if the contactor is mechanically stuck closed.


3

I'm guessing the wiring is in conduit since you've got two black wires in the box. The conduit probably goes to whatever the switch controls, the source location. At that location, you'll have a hot wire and a neutral. You'll need to pull a new wire (white) from there to the box where you want to install the switch/outlet. Pigtail the new wire to the ...


3

To reliably determine the gauge of the copper wire inside your brown unmarked jacketed cable from 1977, use a wire gauge that comes with wire strippers like this one: You'll need access to the copper core, which means you need to get into a junction box or other outlet box that the cable leads to, and disconnect the black or white wire at a nut or screw. ...


3

The datasheet for your panel says it is a 6 slot, 12 circuit panel, which means it should be compatible with tandem breakers. A tandem breaker is two small breakers that take up the same slot as one full sized breaker. But you have all double-pole breakers... Well, they make a solution for that too which is two tandem breakers joined together. The middle ...


2

It sounds like you know a little about logic. The problem you posed would best be solved using a small PLC, commonly referred to as a smart relay. I have used Zelio in the past and had fantastic results. Smart relays are very easy to setup and program. Zelio, in particular, has a visual design app to simplify programming. They come with a number of different ...


2

Yes, you can certainly do that. However, you don't really need a 200 amp breaker on the bus bars as the bus is already protected by a 200 amp main breaker. You can get the HOML2225 sub feed lug kit. It looks like a circuit breaker but it has no handle. It simply allows you to tap the bus bars to add a sub feed, and comes with an additional neutral lug as ...


2

It is just a bit of drywall. It does not conduct electricity and is not combustible or flammable. Don't worry about it.


2

That 2-2-2-4 is just a trifle too small for your plans... Were this an actual 100A subpanel, fed by 1AWG hot and neutral wires, you'd be able to do this without much issue. However, since you're dealing with 2AWG Al here, your feeder is only good for 90A due to the fact the 83% service/feeder rule for entire dwelling units doesn't apply to feeders that ...


2

If this was new construction and an inspector saw this, he's make you pull new wire. Since it's existing, wire nut some extra wire onto the short piece so you have room to work with the switch. Never, ever cut wire in a junction box. you never know when you might need it.


2

You are going to have to figure out how to keep the foam out of the boxes. Once it cures you are fine. You will have to use the low expanding stuff and keep it from entering the back tabs. The fronts we saran wrap and rubber band. The back tabs are not easy to block. I don't really understand the logistics you have going on here too... You have the ...


2

Let's review how 3-ways work. Note the 2 travelers: one is hot, and one is not. They must necessarily always be in the same cable, and be the same on both ends. That uses up all the brass screws and leaving only 1 screw left per switch. Once you get the travelers right, there are precious few wires left. Hooking up the remaining wires is fairly obvious. ...


2

A few points First, EVs don't use neutral. The J1772 connector doesn't even have a neutral pin... and there's not much inside an EVSE, so it doesn't need neutral (unless they really chintzed out on the internal GFCI, in which case, don't buy that one). So neutral wire goes away. Second, you may be able to run better wire insulation that allows higher ...


2

A 50A receptacle/plug is the proper configuration to use with a 40A range and 40A range cord. Pay special attention to the instructions that come with your range, they are part of the UL/CSA/ETL Listing. If the instructions specify a 50A breaker then you need a 50A breaker and wire to feed to it. You may have a 40A breaker because a previous range specified ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible