28

It should be replaced. Electrically it will work but mechanically the sharp edges exposed by the burnt off plastic insulation could damage the new socket. Also the missing insulation makes it less safe.


22

Replace both the plug and the socket and don't use either until they're repaired properly. If you choose to use this burnt plug in a different socket, the carbonising will add resistance to the circuit, heating it up and damaging the second socket which then also needs replacing. The heat buildup can also start a fire, and there's a fair chance any Insurance ...


19

Since you've got conduit, and since most lights are not designed to be directly on 30A circuits (normally in the US designed for 15A or 20A circuits), run two 15A or 20A circuits through that conduit instead. It will take more spaces in your panel - if that is a problem, upload a picture of the panel for help. Note that 2 x 15A is perfect for the lighting. ...


16

Back to the store it goes. Switches which only take backstab connections are the cheapest of the builder/slumlord grade cheap. Backstab connection, in general, are bad news - while legal, they are widely known to be unreliable. They tend to knock out half your circuit and send you on a frustrating "bug hunt" - hang out here for a week and you'll ...


15

Screw-down insert connectors are very reliable. They're really no different from a well-done loop under a screw. Just be sure to strip the wire to the correct length. There should be a gauge molded into the outlet back plate. These aren't really "push-in" connectors since you still have to clamp them. The push-in connectors that are problematic use ...


12

You can, but you need a 3/4" KO and the correct clamp to do so If you're working with a 3/4" or larger knockout, you can get 3 12/2 or 12/3 NM cables into it. You just need a cable clamp that's listed/rated for that many cables; fortunately, the Arlington NM842 is cheap and fits the bill perfectly here. It can even accept 4 12/2, or 2 12/3 and 1 ...


11

REPLACE IT. <- that is all the answer should require....and you probably already suspected that.


11

You put the switch and the light fixture both between hot & neutral, effectively parallel to each other. That makes the light always on and the switch creates a short between hot & neutral - correctly tripping the breaker. What you have is a switch loop. They are confusing at first but actually quite simple. Light switches are normally wired in the &...


8

Your grow lamps plugs are probably NEMA 5-15 or 5-20 if not hard-wired. NEMA 5-15 or 5-20 are rated for a 15 or 20 amp circuit, but not a 30 amp circuit. If not hard wired, or not NEMA 15 or 20, you'll need to run 2 circuits....absolute minimum is 12 gauge on 20 amp breakers. That will give you 1,920 watts per circuit. The theoretical limit is 2,400 watts ...


7

Having multiple circuits in one box as fine, as long as you don't cross the streams! What you propose (i.e. having a 15A circuit share a box with a 20A circuit) is entirely fine and normal. There is one thing you'll want to be careful about though, and that's not crossing the streams; while you'll need to connect all the grounding conductors together, you ...


6

I suggest that for this scale of operation you make a greenhouse addition to your house. 18 hr * 30A * 120v = 65 kWh/day. At 10 c/kwh thats $200/month. A greenhouse allows you to reduce your lamp time to about 6 hours a day. Depending on what you raise, and your climate you may need to heat your greenhouse at night in winter.


6

NEC 210.23(A) Says 15 and 20A branch circuits "shall be permitted to supply lighting unit(s)...", and (B) say 30A circuits shall be allowed for "heavy-duty lampholders in other than a dwelling unit(s).." So you can't do a 30A branch in a family room of a home. Multiple circuits or a subpanel (even if for 2 15A circuits) are your options.


6

There's a concept called grandfathering which says If the work was legal on the day it was installed, then when Code changes later, it's still legal. You're not required to tear out a bunch of wiring every 3 years when Code is revised. This gets into a lot of lawyering about when the work was done and what was legal then. However we can safely pass ...


6

Clamps/fittings need to be NRTL (UL/ETL) Listed, and the instructions on or with the fittings are part of the Listing, and will indicate the number and type of cables allowed.


5

Other than quickly reducing your visitors (wow, remember when we had visitors?) to those like-minded individuals who love HPS light, there's no issue with putting a wet-rated "exterior" fixture indoors, unless the instructions forbid that. Indoors is generally a less extreme environment than outdoors, so a fixture that operates safely outdoors will ...


5

For line voltage (120/240 - all 120V to ground, so basically the same voltage from a code perspective) you don't need a divider. A divider is needed when you have low voltage (network/TV/phone) sharing with line voltage. Unless you are sticking in a 240/120 receptacle (like an L14-20) you'll only have one neutral, so @manassehkatz-Moving 2 Codidact's concern ...


5

With devices that are not listed to run on 30 amps the best option would be to go ahead and run the #10 and set up a small sub panel. With the sub panel you could run the circuits for the devices you want to use. I do commercial lighting and even with that it is rare to have more than 1000w lamps at 240v that’s only ~4.1 amps or ~8.3 amps at 120v. A sub ...


5

You can block it. However, you should consider one of three other options: Disconnect - Find the other end. Disconnect it. Label it ("living room bookcase"). That way if someone (including yourself) years from now looks at the tangle of wiring and wonders "Hmmm, maybe this wire might go where I need it" or "What does this do, can I ...


5

Meet the old-style switch loop Back in the bad old days when "smart switches" were not a thing, switches only required two wires, namely always-hot and switched-hot. So, to save money, electricians took advantage of that fact and ran /2 cable to connect a switch to a light fixture when power came into the light. This scheme is called a switch ...


4

Don't use the back stabs, they are often the cause of failures. Use the screws on the side instead. If the switch doesn't have screws, buy an other one that does. And NO, you can't use 14ga on a 20 amp circuit anywhere. Just get a high quality switch, it's your least expensive and best option.


4

You state in your comment that you plan to run conduit. In that case, do NOT use UF cable. Use THWN wiring - the conduit protects it, and it's much easier to pull than UF cable. It may also cost you less, and it can indeed be easily upgraded if or when you or a later owner wants to upgrade. 12Ga should be fine for your planned use. If your use increased, ...


4

What you're after is called messenger supported wiring, and it's an established part of the NEC The good news is that what you're after is quite possible within the NEC, using a wiring method called messenger supported wiring. In short, this involves suspending a steel messenger wire between the two structures, and then using that messenger to support ...


4

I'd use an indoor JB directly opposite the disconnect with a nipple connecting the two Rather than trying to run the cable out exposed and then into the bottom of the box, or try to clamp it when it's going into the back, I'd put an ordinary 2½" deep, "5S" (really just under 4¾") square metal junction box on the inside back-to-back with ...


4

You would first need to change the breaker from 50A to 15A. Your 50A circuit needs to be one with a neutral (in terms of a typical range outlet, a 4-prong, not a 3-prong.) At that point, not a problem (assuming you are on normal USA/Canada 120/240 split-phase, 120V to neutral power.) However, you might find more use in putting a sub-panel fed by the 50A ...


4

That's only a problem if your wire-nut technique is bad. Most people's technique is terrible when they start. Where people depart is that some refuse to learn, and do not test their work, or think, or refine their technique. They simply tape the wires onto the nuts to keep them from falling apart. This only hides the symptom; the root problem is a poor ...


3

DANGER! First things first, until you get this corrected stop using your 1500W heater! You're seriously overloading your 16 AWG extension cord. That cord is only good for about 870W (source). Very likely the only reason it hasn't melted is that you're using it outside in the cold, so it can shed its excessive heat more easily than normal, but it's only a ...


3

The existing circuit doesn't comply with Code in the first instance... The one Code issue with your plan is that the existing circuit you're trying to tap from doesn't conform with the NEC to begin with. In particular, it violates NEC 210.52(B) because (B)(1) requires that the kitchen small appliance branch circuits not only feed the kitchen countertops, ...


3

This looks good, although you'll have to pay attention to keeping your neutrals separated in the switch boxes! Your plan for the light circuit should not be an issue at all; you're running proper NEC 2011 new-style switch loops with neutrals provisioned for future use, and your fixtures are designed to take LED modules, not Edison-base bulbs, so some dim ...


3

Because it bends easier and even when bent to extremes it normally doesn't break or malfunction. Single strand gets nicks and kinks when bent and just a lot harder for your average person to deal with. You have to think sometimes you are shoving wires where ever when installing a light fixture or fan. A home owner may not be comfortable pressing as hard ...


3

General convention is "Up" is on and "Down" is off. However, for a 3-way switch, "light is on" is on and "light is off" is off, and people manage to live with that every day. I would recommend that you install your standard toggle switch with the lettering readable from the normal, human, upright position. However, as ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible