25

Oh dear. This is a foogly mess. First, you did the right thing by punching that main panel breaker down onto a single. The problem is with the subpanel; it is very badly misconfigured by a guy who cut a lot of shortcuts. First, it is illegal to double-tap neutral bar screws like that, unless the panel's labeling or instructions say they are intended ...


10

Edit: I wrote this answer before the photo was added. I will defer to Harper’s answer that goes into much detail about the problems. You have a 240 volt sub panel which was fed from a 240 volt breaker. Now you’re feeding only half of the sub panel with a 120 volt breaker. Sorry, what did you think would happen? Maybe you don’t understand how dual-leg 240 ...


7

Yes, but negligibly. Any connection increases fire risk by increasing the chance of heat buildup due to resistance, sparks due to arcing, etc. The question is how much, and the answer is not much. Since you already probably have dozens of such connections in your home (including such high-current things as a microwave and kitchen range), and since most of ...


7

In fact, there are UL-listed power strips that provide an octopus of short cords-on-sockets. (by the way it was hell to find a genuine UL-listed unit of good provenance from Stanley; most of the Amazon listings are cheap Cheese junk off the Amazon marketplace.) It depends If it's blocky because it's a wall-wart style transformer, then normal loads simply ...


6

Neutral is not ground Neutral is the normal path of current return. Ground is an emergency path, only used if something is seriously wrong (in lieu of sending power through a human, and it helps to get breaker to trip). Because of that, it's OK to spiderweb all grounds to each other. This should never be done with neutral. Currents must be equal in ...


5

Call the power company and report an outage! Specifically a Lost Neutral. This situation of two loads (on different circuits) "competing" for voltage and affecting the voltage of everything else, with some appliances not getting enough power and others getting fried, is a classic symptom of a lost neutral. It's as simple as that. Don't make it ...


5

You need a double pole breaker. More specifically, you need a breaker that supplies power from both phases on the main panel. Half your breakers in the sub are now not powered because they were connected to the second phase. It’s not clear what they are tied to now.


5

Suppose you did. The unit is labeled for 2500 watts, which means that is how much power you must provision. Let's allow 3% for transformer losses; now we are at 2575 watts. An air conditioner is treated as a continuous load, so like a lot of things, you must provision power for 125% of the actual load. So 2575 watts x 125% = 3219 watts. If you've ...


5

No, you can't do that in this case UNLESS... Note that the AC requires 240V @ 15A. Assuming perfect conversion with the transformer (not reality but it doesn't matter here) that means you need a 120V @ 30A outlet. While these are possible, chances are you don't have this. It's most likely a 15A or 20A circuit either of which will be inadequate for the AC ...


5

10 gauge is larger than 12 gauge. If you meant "can I use the smaller one coz it's cheaper", the answer to that is pretty universally no, but you don't need us to tell you that. The distance might be a factor that might call for going with a larger wire (that would be #8 or #6). But if your pump is recommending the 30A breaker, its draw is certainly ...


4

Yo Dawg Who was the electrician? Xzibit??? Because putting a GFCI in another GFCI's protected zone is rather silly. Speaking of silly... Refrigerators and GFCIs You want a refrigerator to last a long time, so they want to hermetically seal the Freon stages so the Freon doesn't leak out. But how do you seal the piston rings of a compressor? By ...


4

It's in NEC 110.12. Mechanical Execution of Work. "Electrical equipment shall be installed in a neat and workmanlike manner." (which does not mean nipping back all the wires in your service panel). First, they make non-metallic caps for the ends of conduit fittings. Google "rigid conduit insulated bushing". They are nominally to prevent wire gouging, but ...


4

The problems of 'greedy' power supplies can be resolved by using power bars which have proper individual sockets for each position. They also tend to have better quality contacts than the cheap multi-way strips. from https://olsondirect.co.uk/oldsite/13a_standard_flat.htm They also do USA standard ones, eg https://olsondirect.co.uk/oldsite/usa_15amp.htm


3

The red alert here isn't actually the aluminum wire. It's the multi-wire branch circuits particularly when combined with double-stuff breakers, with that stacked on top of a 1970 era panel. Aside from the usual horror-shows like Zinsco, FPE, Challenger (that one's fixable) etc., there's also the inherent fact that 1970s era panels are much too small. That ...


3

No! A non-contact tester is used to double-check that a circuit is on/wired correctly (i.e., if it doesn't light up when expected, then there is a problem) or off (i.e., if it lights up when you don't not expected, then there is a problem). When used to check that a circuit is off, that is typically to make sure that it is safe to work on the wiring: Check ...


3

There is a poor connection wire to connector or connector to element, either causes an increase in resistance and therefore heating. It may be worth replacing that wire either from its source or cutting it back until you get to clean undamaged wire with a good connection to a newcterminal and cleaning the element connection surface.


3

Big arc flash is big Sparks flew out from your breaker box. Not from your meter pan, nor from a socket; from the breaker box. I assume you normally keep the cover on it and no gaps in the cover, so sparks getting around the breakers is actually a pretty big deal. This is a big arc flash. So I would expect it to leave big evidence behind. And where I ...


3

Yes you should replace the socket. It sounds like the contacts in the socket are going bad and are just about making contact with one plug and not the other. Socket contacts that are only just about making contact are not a good thing.


3

As the gauge number goes up, the size goes DOWN. You cannot use 12ga wire on a 30A breaker, 10ga is the minimum size. Whether or not you can use 10ga wire for something that is 160' away is another issue relating to what's called "voltage drop" and is caused by the natural resistance of the wire based on the actual load at the other end. How you combat ...


2

I used an NO relay at the back of the switch box. Link here. The dimmer now dims the LED baffles and the relay always send full current to the non-dimmable LEDs whenever the dimmer is at any level.


2

I have also been advised to include some lights on the smoke & fire detector circuit, in order to give you some indication if the smoke & fire has gone offline. I believe Ed Beal's comment about 760.41.b refers to dedicated fire alarm panels, and that residential detectors are considered receptacles. I found this https://www.electriciantalk.com/f5/...


2

There are two separate issues here: Bare Ground vs. Anything Else A bare ground of a particular size is, nominally, no different from an insulated wire of the same size. However, wrapping a length of wire with electrical tape does not provide the same level of protection as manufactured insulation, and is not considered a reliable substitute. Among the ...


2

Is it practical? I guess the question is, "does lightning strike twice?" One problem is with near misses. Lightning has so much voltage at biblical amperage, that it creates a voltage gradient across the ground. Earth at your remote outlet could be 20,000 volts hotter than your house. This is what kills animals; the voltage on their front feet is ...


2

If you have an electrical box at the second switch bank location with enough cubic inch volume you should really keep each circuit separate (i.e. not inter tie the neutrals). The primary reason is that you want the current in the hot line (in this case the travellers) and the neutral of each cable to be the same. Another good reason for that would be that ...


2

First, this wire is probably dead and unused because of how short someone cut it. It's not usable like that and I would hope the person that cut it intended it to be dead and never used in the future. That said, the work was done by an amateur so you shouldn't assume anything. You are correct that you shouldn't work on a circuit when the breaker is on (...


2

Yes. That is exactly what we recommend. You can go as large as 42 space for just a few dollars more. Beyond 42 space, the cost gets prohibitive. There is no problem having the subpanel be of a larger ampacity than the breaker protecting it.


2

Out of Balance The first, and foremost, concern is that your MWBC doesn't follow the rules needed for a MWBC, and in fact won't work, even, as the shared neutral will cause imbalanced current into the GFCI in space 4, tripping it. You can fix all the issues with this MWBC in a single stroke by getting a QF220A and putting it in spaces 3 and 4, then landing ...


2

I'd use a saddle box instead Instead of trying to cobble together something out of two different boxes, raising issues of access to the upper box, I would use a saddle box that fits around the rafter instead, as shown below (photo for exposition only). This provides adequate space for splicing while allowing easy access to all the wiring here just by ...


1

Safe to touch the insulation (that is undamaged)... But NOT the conductor under any circumstances. But for me, and this is IMHO, give me my favorite Fluke multimeter over that device as when I need to check for a loss of voltage ie 10% or 20% low etc it's the tool for the job.


1

Nope, there's another section of the NEC that limits here In copper, 14AWG is limited to 15A, 12AWG to 20A, and 10AWG to 30A not by the ampacity tables or even necessarily termination ratings, but by the small conductor rules set forth in NEC 240.4(D), points 3 through 7 (points 1 and 2 apply to 18AWG and 16AWG conductors, but no branch circuit breakers I ...


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