60

It's in the Building and Electrical Codes You may have noticed that you can walk into a room that you've never been in before, and reach for a light switch, your hand has a really good chance of finding it. It's almost like magic, and it's so universal that people take it for granted. Actually, it's no accident. It's required by both the electrical and the ...


22

Crossing existing utilities is no problem; it happens all the time. Just be careful when digging. There is probably a prescribed margin to either side of the marks within which digging must be done with "hand tools only." In some areas the margin is 24 inches to either side (48 inches plus the width of the marks themselves); in other areas it is 18 ...


14

No, that's illegal and has always been illegal. You are confusing neutral and ground, which is understandable since they go to the same place in the main panel. However they are actually different and separate; they are tied together in the main panel and that is the only reason they're allowed on the same bus. Don't let that confuse you. The water heater ...


10

No, you can't do it unless there's a "nail plate" to protect it from physical damage (nails). You could mill it out to 15/16" and lay in EMT metal conduit. It has the thinnest wall of any conduit and will provide the needed physical protection. Use that either simply as a damage shield in the vulnerable area, or if able, as a full-on wiring ...


9

You can put your new underground line at that location. Where it may get tough is the depth of the trench: if the existing lines are just at 18 or 24”, depending on your run. If you are using UF you need 24” of cover, if conduit 18” or dig under the existing services. Be cautious, as I have had markings be over a foot off and the lines be shallower than code ...


9

Additional reason: More than 20 years ago I had a socket in the garden, switched from the inside. That was to deny any unauthorized person a connection for power tools. While still doing that, is is no longer effective as everything is battry operated now.


7

When you pull the trigger of the saw, the motor winding looks like nearly a dead short (maybe 0.3 ohms) for a few AC line cycles. Until the motor spins up and/or heats up, the current is primarily limited only by series resistance in the building wiring and the motor windings. During motor start, the type and length of wire makes a huge difference. You ...


7

Think aluminum Since you are concerned about costs, I would try to nudge you off novices' preconceptions about copper vs aluminum wire. Novices tend to "stay with what they know" (having worked with copper in 15/20A branch circuits), and tend to believe all the scary stories about aluminum wiring in 15/20A branch circuits. This extrapolates into ...


6

There are spring tabs on the left side of the fitting, against the mounting plate. As you suspected, squeeze them. You'll probably need a pliers to get them tight enough to the fitting to fit back through. Loosen the screw or press the tab to release it from the flex conduit.


6

A number of years ago it was required by building code to have a switched receptacle if there are no ceiling fixtures in a room. It still is I am certain. It is a safety issue for entering a room when it is dark. If you have a ceiling light, then I believe it can go, but to remove all the related wiring and switch will require drywall work and/or a blank ...


5

Sure, there is a mating plug: you need a L16-20P. The charger may not have come with a plug because it is built for different voltages/frequencies, meaning it is sold in other parts of the world that have different standards for their plugs and receptacles. NEMA sets the standards for plugs in the US, which is where the L16-20p standard comes from. Other ...


5

Personally, I'd switch to EMT once inside and away from the need for limited cover depth for burial. Maintains the conduit-as-grounding-path. No need for a junction on the wires - just a transition in conduit types at a pull point or box. Resists rodent teeth. Easily bent. Borrow, rent or buy a bender. Read up a bit on using a bender. Fulfills the "...


5

Although this has an accepted answer there is a lot of guessing going on here. NEC 300.18 requires raceways “shall be installed complete between outlet, junction, or splicing points prior to installation of the conductors”. The hand book then identifies the reason: the handbook is an expanded version of the code (and the book that most inspectors use with ...


4

As to your direct questions, Is this a valid and code-compliant configuration for safe, utility compliant net metering ? Have I described anything (other than the car hookup) that doesn't work the way I think it will ? There are 4 way manual transfer switches, right ? These reflect a "skill gap" which is rather enormous, and far too large to ...


4

Ok 2 parts, yes you are misunderstanding how a (listed) GFCI completes its test. The test is completed by the internal circuitry creating an imbalance. The clicking noise you hear is the mechanical debounce that helps the reset function work better (not all GFCI’s use this method but many do because who would trust a micro switch smaller than a pencil ...


4

Once inside convert to NM wire type in a junction box then no conduit will be needed. If you are using thhn dual rated you can use non metallic flexible conduit and stay with the same wire if you already have the wire. Non metallic is usually called smurf tubing because it is usually blue but comes in many colors if your walls will be closed it will be fine, ...


4

A remote switch for an power outlet can also be a safety measure. When I was a child, a TV appliance caught fire during the night and we lost part of our home. When my parents got to build their own house later, they put a master switch on each room that would control all power outlets in that room. Every night they would make the rounds cutting off power to ...


4

I'd simply take this transformer back and get a different one The transformer you have was designed for use as a replacement transformer inside HVAC equipment, hence the design with primary and secondary wires in the same nipple. However, this also means it's RU (UL Component Recognized, or Rather Useless to us) instead of being UL listed, which isn't ...


3

Power equals amps times volts, and for all practical purposes is exactly the same, other than measurement error. Twice the volts, half the amps, same power. That's a very power hungry computer by modern standards - there, there's real room for potential savings by using a more power efficient computer.


3

Any branch of the circuit whose hot and neutral are plugged into the "Load" terminals, will be protected from that GFCI. You are required to label those outlets "GFCI Protected" (NEC 110.3(B) and 8(C) of instructions). Use any labeling method that isn't handwritten. Also mark "No Equipment Ground" if applicable (NEC 406.4(D)2)....


3

Yes it's possible but it wouldn't be code compliant if it's 120v. Wires must be 1-1/2 inches from the surface so that you won't hit them by mistake with a screw or nail. If you had some sort of metal conduit you could do it. Low voltage wiring is fine.


3

I'd use conduit with THHNs in it and save the UF for wiring the office-shed One thing most people don't realize about UF is that it can be used as a substitute for NM with the same makeup; the NEC permits this in NEC 340.10 point 4, and while it's usually uneconomical, it's a good way to use up spare lengths of UF. This is because while it's legal to use UF ...


2

If your foam block is multiple layers deep sometimes it's possible to run a fish tape between layers. Take off the leader if present, use a blowtorch to heat the fishtape and fold about 3"(75mm) tightly back on itself (no loop), tape tightly together starting 1" down from the tip, stretching the tape slightly and use only 1 layer if possible. Use ...


2

You may be able to replace the mount plate and tubular arm with a custom assembly of black iron pipe and fittings that acts as a stand. From bottom up... A 3/4" or 1" floor flange (whatever is large enough to cover the junction box) A vertical pipe of ~18" A 90° elbow to horizontal A pipe nipple of ~8" A 90° elbow to vertical (downward) ...


2

That appears to be a solid state speed controller. On my side of the pond they don’t have the built in fuse. If you purchase a locally sourced solid state speed controller that has 1.6 amp capability or more you should be fine.


2

Here is a different answer, having now seen the ceiling box. (Thanks to @threephaseEel for requesting that) You have a shallow box with a chandelier hub in it that will obstruct a typical crossbar and nipple. You also have knob and tube wiring so I'm hesitant to suggest changing or modifying the box at all. To work with this box you need to buy an ...


2

If your goal is to minimize trenching, Rigid conduit is the best choice... it only needs 6" of cover, you can trench it with a garden trowel. Note this is 12" under a vehicle pathway (driveway etc.) Use largest size you're willing to pay for but 1/2" is enough for small stuff. Note that Rigid conduit and the metal boxes it is bolted to ...


2

From where I am, there is no code requiring switches to power outlets but I have installed one for my autistic son's TV. I require that all appliances not in use be unplugged to save on the electric bill. The outlet switch however makes it easier for my son to just leave the TV plugged in reducing the chances for him to be electrocuted.


2

Unlike some lamps this doesn't hang from a metal tube with the cord running through it. It hangs from the cord. Shove it through the nipple and tie a knot above it. There are S-shaped plastic dongles you can attach to the cable above the nipple, but those cost about 10 cents more than a knot and do the same thing. Hopefully your ceiling box already has a ...


2

You CANNOT add a neutral bus. You can add a ground bus. Neutral is not ground. The essential difference here is that neutrals handle normal service current 24x7... whereas grounds only handle current during a ground-fault event. So the neutral bars have thermal considerations ground bars do not, as well as, you don't want current to normally be present on ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible