17

Even "dry" concrete contains considerable water, and is a relatively good conductor. So, it's a relatively good path to ground for a person touching it, increasing the odds of a lethal shock. Generally, for something to make it into the electrical code, some number of people have probably died due to the lack of it before that happened.


14

Do you need actual outlets? Chargers and lights can both be run off of USB, and a USB hub+extension cables doesn't even involve real wiring. It also works in both 120V and 240V countries with just a plug adapter as long as you get a 120/240V hub, which could be an issue if you just use regular outlets. I'm not sure there's any legal concerns, because you're ...


10

Instructions are obtuse because of UL This has to do with the device's UL listing. UL only approves devices for certain applications; i.e. you can't use an Alumiconn to splice 9600V wiring. Two things assure you stay within those applications: First NEC 110.3(B) which requires you obey the labeling and instructions, and second, UL also approves the ...


9

I have seen those instructions, I thought it was funny at first but after thinking of the number of times DIY folks get line and load mixes up with just 4 wires and all the rat’s nests I have repaired over the years it may make sense for those that do not understand what they are doing. The line terminals connect to the feeder from the panel normally black ...


7

You don't need GFCI receptacles anywhere. Nobody cares how you provision the GFCI protection. You are welcome to have one GFCI device and feed all the receptacles from the protected zone (LOAD) of that GFCI device. You should take the time to learn exactly how downline protection works, and then, put LOAD to good use! That will greatly reduce the cost of ...


5

My preference for this kind of work is to use all steel junction boxes and metal "EMT" conduit throughout. This generally puts the work beyond question or reproach; you don't have to worry about things like wires being pinched. Further, you are able to use the EMT conduit as your ground; meaning you only need to put 2 wires in the pipe. You actually ...


4

I have seen these at Home Depot and a few other home stores. They are not cheap, about $10. I would be more concerned about why your fuses are blowing. Are the circuits overloaded? You need to determine that first. Don't even think about increasing the fuse/breaker size until you or someone else checks the wire size for the circuits. Just get a few boxes of ...


4

I recently did the exact same thing you're evaluating. We used a conversion kit to install a pendant light above our sink where there was previously a recessed light. As far as dimmability goes, that's mostly up to the switch and the bulb you have, i.e. you have to have a dimmer switch and a compatible, dimmable bulb. We went with Leviton in this particular ...


3

Get a cover plate with a knockout and a 90 degree connector to your NMT. That should get you started. If doing it for myself I'd use PVC conduit and an entrance ell, but that's just personal preference.


3

wonder if there are any chemical reactions or gases that will enter the van as a result of the back side of the solar panel working No. Solar panels are inert. I also know solar panels need ventilation underneath Yes. A solar panel has a low albedo, probably much lower than the white roof of your van. So the panel radiates a lot of heat. Roof hatches ...


3

This is probably what you are looking for. Hopefully image comes thru. I've never used them, so maybe others have an opinion about them.


3

That connection method should have no effect on dimmability - I've used dozens of replacement can lights that use such an adapter on dimmers, and they work fine. The more common problem I've experienced with dimming a single fixture with LEDs is that many of the LED-compatible dimmers have a minimum wattage as well as a maximum wattage that they will dim on ...


2

Use a Raco 665 or 187 over the receptacle location, then any type of connector out of the top of the box, and you still have the required access to the wires in the box.


2

A 240v only panel has no need for a neutral, I have panels in a industrial facility with no neutral, but for residential my jurisdiction requires a 4 wire feed or 3 with conduit as a ground even for all 240v loads. I think this is because someone may try to use the ground buss at a later date so they require it for residential. But industrial since ...


2

If it's zoned commercial, you may have some permitting issues, because inspectors are not idiots, and they know that you're going to put a Point of Sale system out on that counter/island. If that cabinetry is fixed, you may be better off running some EMT metal conduit along inside the cabinets, and popping that out to some receptacles in appropriate ...


2

This is really a subjective question, and there's a lot of slop in the definition of "temporary". If you know you'll use this space for the long term as it is, I'd work on getting some hard outlets installed. If not, I'd get a 2" hole saw and cut some pass-through ports at strategic places out of sight between cabinet sections and through the floor, as ...


2

How about something like this? You plug the switched outlet into the regular outlet and the remote switch operates your new outlet. You can mount the switch where ever you want. These are available at many home stores and Walmarts. They're inexpensive, about $10 to 15 bucks


2

This is not good! What size breakers are on those circuits?T here are definitely signs of arcing and burning on some of the neutrals that could be caused by loose connections. Turn off the power to those circuits, cut the burnt part of those white wires off, strip off 1/2" of the insulation and insert the wires in different holes in the neutral buss and ...


2

Those colors OK, so B2-B5 (blacks I assume?) are hot all the time, and would be even if B1 and B6 were disconnected. Those four wires perform the following 4 jobs (and I really don't care which is which, as it's irrelevant): Always-hot from the supply Always-hot onward to other points of use Always-hot to switch 1 Always-hot to switch 2 I like to force ...


2

Honestly, smart switches are the way to do that. I still don't understand why you want a switch on the PIR, however; it only disrupts its functionality. So I would straight-wire right through the leftmost switch so it is bypassed. In the right switch box, put a smart-switch "master" and control the garage lights. Then in the leftmost switch box, fit a ...


1

Don't worry about how to wire up a 120v bulb - just get one that is designed for 220v. Half the world uses 220v for lighting and general purpose outlets, so it's not hard to find online. If you want to find something in a local store, look closely at the boxes for LED bulbs. They could have a power supply that supports a wide range for the global market. ...


1

First no mater what the generator’s alternator has stamped on it this means nothing! You do not know the test conditions in either case for the alternator or the complete gen set. And taking things apart probably voided warranty. I maintain very large gen sets and to provide an example one is a 350kva this gen set is certified for life safety equipment and ...


1

When the outlets/receptacles were installed, replaced were the backstabs used or were the wires shepherd hooked around the screw terminals? The backstabs are notorious for failing and causing exactly the type of problem you're experiencing. You need to check all the outlets and correct this if in fact backstabs were utilized.


1

You typically put this horizontally between joists or trusts so you can center an electrical box. The 50LB load will be pulling down on the bar hanger. To support an octagonal box between trusts. Adjustable from 11.5" to 18.5" Maximum load: 50 Lb (22.70 Kg) Not intended for ceiling fan


1

The first outlets you replaced had a black wire, white wire and ground coming in, feeding the outlet and then leaving the outlet to go to another outlet, feeding it and going somewhere else. The last outlet on the circuit will only have a black wire, white wire and ground coming in to feed the outlet and will end there. Just hook the single black wire to ...


1

OK, based on this highly technical drawing I'm going to say that B2, B3, B4 & B5 are all connected and hot. one of the B's is the feed and is connected to a feed out. B2 and B5 make both switches hot. B1 would then control the lanterns and B6 would control the post light. Now you've stated that the grounds have not been shown. You also seem to be ...


1

Normally they will only hang their wire on their pole, set in an easement. Your first option "run a power line straight down along the pole" is still your first option. The utility must already have easements to access the pole that would in all likelihood cover burial to your yard. In my State they even need an easement for the overhead to cross neighbors ...


1

Try Using A radio, Plug it in, Turn it on, and set the volume to full. Then go to your circuit breakers and start switching them on and off until you hear the radio turn off.


1

That light fixture was too close to the wall anyway. Patch the old hole with a self-sticking drywall patch, then mount a new box to the joist about 8" further away from the wall. There are boxes that can be screwed right into the joist from below the ceiling (look for Madison Electric Products Fan and Fixture 1-Gang Gray Polycarbonate New Work/Old Work ...


1

There's no point to adding a switch here Since you will have to move the meter-main anyway, which'll require PG&E to cut your service drop and reattach it at the pole, there's no point in adding the extra switch you describe. So, why can't the new meter-main go where the old one did? Well, the NEC simply requires clear working space (110.26(A)) around ...


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