27

Yes, that's a scary article but keep in mind that both safety devices have to fail to have the tank explode. The pressure release valve and the high limit on the thermostat both have to malfunction. Both of them to my knowledge operate at around 200 degrees F. The maximum you can set most water heaters is 150 degrees F but most recommendations are to set ...


24

Consider the sources; it is plumbers giving you a scare story to get you to hire them. See also "aluminum wiring". It will take a chain of 3 events at once: failure of the thermostat, causing the heater to overheat the water, boiling it. the pressure relief valve fails to operate, preventing the pressure from simply blowing out the relief valve; that'...


8

An electric water heater explodes when the water in it starts boiling, producing pressurized steam that causes the heater to rupture. In order for this to happen, three things all need to fail; if any one of them works properly, no explosion will happen. First, the thermostat needs to get stuck in the "on" position. If it's working normally, or if it ...


7

No, because of the source. Generally anything you find on eBay or Amazon Marketplace is from the endless junkstream from Alibaba. These things are firestarters. There are two things you need. Must have a UL listing (or other recognized testing lab; not CE) Equipment used in mains wiring must meet basic quality standards. That is called out on ...


6

Connect all ground wires together in the light/fan combo. Ground paths often parallel, like anytime MC cable is used, a ground wire is pulled into a conduit, or a metal box is installed on a metal stud. 250.130(C) only applies in conditions of the paragraph ahead of it, where it refers to receptacle replacements and circuit extensions of existing circuits (...


6

Well, the answer is right there in the article you linked: Always check your hot water heater’s pressure relief valve to ensure it is in good working condition. If you have any concerns that your water heater is not functioning accurately, have an inspector come take a look at it. The best precaution you can take to avoid having this happen to ...


5

No, that's not right. -- Unless UL says it is (i.e. if they approved the labeling and instructions for the lug to say that you can do that). But I really doubt that. Retrofit a ground bar. They are readily available in the $7 range. Your panel probably has holes pre-drilled and pre-tapped for an accessory ground bar; add a photo of your panel's labeling ...


5

That cable is old cloth jacketed nonmetallic cable. I would say by the 1970's, this was no longer being installed, nonmetallic cable in the 1970's had a plastic jacket not too much different than what's used today. The ground wire was considerably smaller on the old cloth jacketed cable, and the early plastic jacketed cable. I see a lot of old 12-2 ...


4

Yes, you will need grounding rods in addition to a wired ground wire in the feeder. You need 2 grounding rods at least 10' apart. Do not use a 60A panel in the garage; they have too few spaces in them to be useful. Use a panel with at least 16 spaces; it costs very little more and you'll want the spaces later. The size of the main breaker in the ...


4

You mean like a rattail or Western Union splice, Al-Cu? Your first problem is that soldering in general is so alien that an AHJ is likely to reject it out of hand, even if it were all Cu. The ruling would likely be "You can solder if you can show how every other splicing method is impracticable". But when it comes to Cu-Al splicing... NEC 110.14 ...


4

Yes. You understand to never parallel neutrals. Paralleling grounds is fine. Go ahead and attach them all; the more the merrier!


4

You may be able to pull the panel off the wall and attach the plywood then screw into the plywood. I usually seal the plywood so it will last longer and look nicer. All my phone and data patch blocks are hung with plywood. I do this in unfinished basements as this extends the life of the panel if the wall is damp.


4

My guess is this is a retrofit ground wire, added to upgrade a two-prong receptacle to a three-prong. If this is the case, the wire would go from the ground terminal on that receptacle to another ground - the code allows several things for the other ground. It should not be orange, instead green or bare, and it should be installed in a more "neat and ...


3

The amount of voltage and power that we are talking about here is too low to worry about stressing the wires or any other part of the system so don't worry about that. The Ring will require a "modern" doorbell transformer, so that needs to be replaced for sure. The old chime will likely not work with a 16v transformer if it was made for 10v. It might work ...


3

What you're trying to do isn't going to work Judging by the extra Romex freshly brought into this box, it looks like you're trying to power an additional lamp or outlet from here, and specifically, from this here switch. Not gonna happen. At least not the way you intend. However, a new thing changes the picture: Smart switches. There's good chance ...


3

Mains guy here. Nope. To be precise, Ms. Nope. We often see people take a bog-standard NEMA 5-15 socket and intentionally miswire it so the (tall) neutral pin is actually connected to the opposing hot pole. That seems to work, when you plug in a computer via the common cord (NEMA 5-15P to IEC C13). But like many things that seem to work, it will kill ...


3

Looks fine, provided it doesn't reflect the physical route of the wires. Looks fine. Those words aren't the right words, but you have the gist. I would say "branched" and "daisy chained". The toaster receptacle needs GFCI protection. The fridge should avoid GFCI. The electrical code doesn't care about whether your fridge is on GFCI, but it ought to, ...


3

Box fill is covered in article 314.16 of the NEC. The wires are counted by size and type for example 14 awg wire is 2 cubic inches for each hot , neutral and only counted once for the ground, if you have a pig tail that doesn’t add to the count, if you have 12 awg wire it is 2.25 for each with a mix of 14 & 12 the 1 ground wire counted will be the ...


3

You will need at least 1 new circuit, and break the circuit and install that new 15amp circuit (I am guessing the wiring is 14 awg) you can get things to work by removing some of the load but you probably have figured that out. If you have room adding a breaker is not that hard but you will need to do some reading and ask more questions. You cannot use 20 ...


3

the terminals are thus: Phase one line Phase one switched Phase two line Phase two switched The little white wires run the timer motor


3

This is a double pole single throw switch. It is designed to run on straight 240V. If you look at the insulator cover, you'll see that #1 and #3 are the line, feed, terminals. If you hook your multi meter to those two terminals you should get 240V. #2 and #4 are your load wires. They will go to your pump. The two white wire hooked up to #1 and #3 supply 240V ...


2

The extractor fan should have a junction box for the splice. There should be a cable like Romex or conduit encasing individual wires. As this is a rental, in the US electrical work in most jurisdictions is required to be done by a licensed electrician or possibly a handyman if it was a replacement, From your description it would not meet code. A photo of ...


2

A more modern solution here involves can-less LED fixtures. No can and no energy loss. Rated for insulation contact in virtually all cases Often wet location rated


2

I strongly advise double protection for any light fixture, fan or switch installed over or within 3' of a bathtub or shower, e.g., provide GFI protection as well. Remember code is only a minimum safety standard which manufacturers and builders substantially influence with a desire to keep costs down. Invariably, you want much better safety protection for ...


2

My answer is just a little different from @Ed Beal 's. There should be enough give in the wiring to lift it off the wall an inch or two without straining any of the connections. If that is the case, I would just cut two pressure treated 2x4's a little wider than the panel, and set them between the panel and the wall, positioned so the boards are behind ...


2

Assuming the connections are not rigid, it shouldn't be too hard to temporarily pull it away. Just be safe, pull the meter socket first.


2

This is a very good, interesting question. The question specifically asks about the NEC, but code aside, aluminum is not really suitable for soldering in the field. Typical tin-lead solder used for electrical / electronic applications will not bond well to aluminum or the aluminum alloys used for aluminum wire. The National Electrical Code has changed ...


2

I would think that the biggest problem would be trying to solder the Aluminum to begin with. Normally it is a major pain to solder for the simple fact that it will start to oxidize as soon as air hits it and just swiping it with flux is not enough. As soon as you get heat near it, unless it is completely covered in flux, it will form a layer of oxide and ...


2

I'm not an expert in this area but I can't see any way that copper wiring can be safely soldered to aluminum wiring. Aside from the galvanic corrosion that would probably occur, copper and aluminum expand at different rates when heat is present from current passing through the wire. The joint will ultimately weaken and fail and I don't see anything in the ...


2

$600 solution You can fit a phase converter, which will take single-phase 240V power and synthesize 240V 3-phase delta (by creating the phantom third phase electronically). $400 solution You can replace the entire motor with any bog-standard 240V single-phase 5 horsepower motor that is 3450 RPM.


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