38

I'm not an expert to tell you whether this is actually a good idea, but an AC unit used for heating is called a heat pump. There are two differences between "a heat pump" and "an air conditioner": Heat pumps contain a reversing valve which reverses the operation so that what would usually be the cold side gets hot and the hot side cools instead. The ...


29

Yes, this would work, but I caution you to consider that the hot side of the A/C could produce airborne water droplets full of bacteria. The typical through-window or through-wall air conditioner condenses water on the cool side and channels this water to a condensate tray on the hot side. The condenser fan typically has fan blades joined by an outer ring ...


9

This would work fine, go for it! The efficiency will come from the differences in temperatures between the heating and cooling elements and the room temperatures, the greater the difference the greater the efficiently (or effectiveness). An HVAC (Heating Ventilation, Air Conditioning) person or store will be able to help you with the calculations, even if ...


5

It sounds like a good plan. but you're right that the controls will be regulating the heat in the wrong room. If you can find a unit that takes an external (to the unit) dumb thermostat, a thermostat could be positioned in the proofer room and used to command heat from the AC. Else you're going to need to have the air conditioner modified to meet your ...


4

Unconventional Alternative I see you have three problems, which you reasonably note may be related: Too much heat on the oven side Too little heat on the proofing side Too little humidity on the proofing side, due to heating the air While a heat pump will certainly solve your problem, I claim that it might actually be overkill. You see, a heat pump is ...


3

A split A/C would avoid big openings in the wall (only a small hole for a pipe/tube is needed), is not expensive and would allow to freely position the elements. And can be extended by a 2nd or 3rd unit if needed resp. for redundancy.


2

I believe that this document is for your unit and it indicates a 3amp fuse. Refer page 29, the trouble shooting section, top row, 5th column


2

This isn't quite an "answer" but too long for a comment. Very interesting and energy efficient idea, very creative! OK, here goes my solution and I would welcome others (esp. the "big 3") to contribute and hopefully improve this suggestion. This would definitely be a "one off" approach. The bottom line parts are: 1) A thermostat (tstat) in the ...


1

First, if it works even at all, check with your power company about any appliance upgrade assistance they may have. They will often subsidize replacement with efficient appliances, especially air conditioners, because every watt of A/C draw they eliminate is a peaking unit power plant they don't have to build. Peaking units are by far the most expensive ...


1

Thinking of using an AC system similar to Rimworld pc game? It is not going to work, efficiently. You are using R22 or R123a gas as a heating fluid? Thouse systems operating at an ambient temperatures around 45-55 C? And you wont be getting a thermal shut-off if you reached your desired heating temprature. So you wont be having any cooling nor ...


1

The idea is good and pretty much possible. Constructing it from off-the-shelf parts can be only a little tricky. First, I am yet to see an AC unit capable of humidifying a room (drying is trivial and will happen by itself, but is not what you need). The temperature controls are not necessarily on the cool side. Where I live, AC units are used more for ...


1

I think this is a clever idea, and doable with a pretty simple hack. If you locate an ordinary hardwired thermostat in the proofer room, and tie the heating terminals on the thermostat to the cooling terminals on the air conditioner, you should get what you're looking for. That will limit your options to units with terminals for an external thermostat. ...


1

I was in the a/c, refrigeration field from 1985-1995. 1) They just fail sometimes and don't need a reason. 2) Technician error, using a capacitor with too low a voltage rating. 3) Poor quality! Dual capacitors are not nearly as durable as single caps. When a dual cap blows, company policy was to replace it with 2 singles. These are basically the only ...


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