15

Software would be nice, but setting up your room diagram is probably more work than just trying your layout in reality. Plus, there's no substitute for actually seeing it in place. I usually do this: Lay a row of tiles down the center of the long axis of the room. Don't forget to space them as you intend to do with the final floor. At key locations, run ...


8

Assuming that this is a locking tongue-and-groove product... Rip the strip and install it as normal. There's no reason at all not to, and it happens on almost every flooring install in one place or another. Your shoe will help secure it and it won't look like some sort of hack.


7

Yes, carpet can be installed without removing the skirting because slightly uneven carpet edges can be stuffed down between the tack strips and the skirting. For wood and tile, straight edges are harder to come by and even a 1/16 of an inch looks bad. The same goes for vinyl, that straight edge will be hard to get. Your alternative to removing the skirting ...


7

Laminate requires an expansion gap. When installed without a gap, laminate buckles up as the flooring heats and expands. Leaving the gap exposed would be unsightly, so the floor trim should be installed over the laminate. Tile likewise should have an expansion gap when installed over a dissimilar material, like wood subfloor. If the gap around the perimeter ...


7

Vinyl flooring will fail in short order if laid over something soft like carpet or carpet padding. It's not designed to flex and stretch as it will under foot traffic and furniture, and more concentrated point loads will simply tear it. It'll also wrinkle as it moves and stretches, creating trip hazards. It must be laid, even temporarily, on a hard surface.


6

Of course, don't tear up the whole thing. But you should consider tearing up just the last full board, and reducing the width of the last two courses: The last board will have to be glued or screwed down, but it will be wide enough so that it won't warp or capsize the way a skinny strip would.


5

Kerosene is a solvent and, like vinyl, also a hydrocarbon. Their molecular structure causes them to bind together, and if left untreated the kerosene will soften and possibly dissolve the vinyl. You can use a solution of water and mild soap such as dish detergent to break the bond and soak up the kerosene. Do not flood the floor with the solution. Use ...


5

Yes it is normal and no, you don't need to seal it. There's always a space between the floor and wall, but in finished parts of your house, there is baseboard that will cover it. If you want to spend money on baseboard behind your stove, go for it, but it serves no purpose other than aesthetics.


4

One product I know of that is meant for this type of scenario is Dricore. It provides a moisture barrier from the floor. DRIcore has an integrate high density polyethylene membrane bonded to the underside of the panel which provides an excellent moisture barrier I've never used it personally though it seems pretty popular in my neck of the woods. I'd ...


4

Sometimes it takes a village. Here's a summary of what ended up working: The first layer of tiling came off without too much trouble by using a heavy duty paint scraper (with a slight bend to it) and a hammer. I was able to get through this in less than an hour. The second layer was much harder. I believe @Ecnerwal was right in that it was actually a layer ...


4

First that concrete subfloor you have is great. Don't ever demo a good concrete bathroom subfloor unless you have to. Second if you don't want a tile floor it is very easy to demo the tile without hurting the concrete sub - How can I speed up the removal of stubborn tile? Third - an easier more viable option is to take out an area of tile around tub ...


4

It's a pain in the neck but you need to remove and dispose of the carpet. Anything you put on top of it will only cover a nasty mess that will get worse over time. Once the carpet is removed you will need to clean the cement of carpet glue. There are many videos and guides for how to remove carpet glue. Once the cement is prepped you have options. The ...


4

You cannot avoid a divot when pulling nails out of concrete small divots I use epoxy filler larger or a large number I use a self leveling compound or hydraulic cement. Vinyl flooring will show divots so they need to be filled.


3

When I lived in MN I had the same issue. I opted to stain the concrete floor. I liked the looked, it was affordable, and as long as I ran a dehumidifier (a requirement in most any mid-western basement anyways) there was no water worries at all. I'd never put carpet in a basement. Been in too many carpeted basements with a definite mildew smell to scare me ...


3

Vinyl isn't very thick, and it is quite plastic. This means that over time, it will conform to the shape of the floor beneath. This means that you will see grooves in the vinyl where there are gaps between the plywood sheets. This means you want the sub-floor to be as smooth as possible. BUT!!!! you need gaps between the sheets to allow for expansion or ...


3

You can use quarter round to extend your baseboards and cover small gaps. (source: houserepairtalk.com) If the gap is really large you can cut a new larger piece of the flooring and line it up with the current floor in order to create a hopefully invisible seam. I think it generally looks better to have two large pieces with a seam instead of one large ...


3

Normally vinyl is just glued down. Robert's adhesive can be bought at the big box. Loctite makes glue for vinyl that can be bought in a caulking tube. You just need to lay some heavy things on the floor after you glue and let it sit for a half day or so.


3

Definitely remove the vinyl no matter what the subfloor is. Especially if it is on particle board. Do the job right and don't listen to so-called carpenters giving bad advice and cutting corners. Remove that particle board too and add plywood to get your heights level. You will never be disappointed doing a job the right way!! Good Luck


3

Spend $50 on a non contact moisture meter rated for concrete. Make sure your system is ok with whatever level you have spring/fall.. Floor grinding with a diamond cup grinder, followed by SLC (self leveling compound) for the low spots would minimize the SLC needed. Follow your vinyl flooring manufacturer for sealing/curing/dryness.


3

aluminum stair nosing –Google source


3

I do happen to like the aluminum, but would stained and varnished oak stair nosing be elegant enough?


3

One option would to roughly fill the deep depressions with a relatively inexpensive mortar mix, and only then pull out the self-levelling stuff so you can use less of it.


3

Some vinyl planking, like mine, has a thin layer of corkboard on bottom to help padding. This is why orange-brown crust is seeping up. Moisture from slab is pushing thru the cork layer and forcing it up. In my case, just in very heavily traveled area in front of bar. Just scraped mine up with plastic dish scrubber and put some lemon oil on it after. Lasted 3 ...


3

I don't recommend doing what you're attempting to do but... If you're covering 2x12 carpet treads, the 2x12 treads will need to be pulled off and have most of the overhang ripped off so you don't end up with a 2-1/2" or better overhang. Then reinstall the treads with liquid nails and screws or 16d nails. From here, starting at the bottom, working towards ...


3

I agree completely with isherwood, especially on a smaller job like a bathroom, but I wanted to add my recent experience with my recent, fairly complicated, tile layout. It required some pre-planning before we could even start to dry-fit the tiles. There were a few factors that caused the need to plan: A very large area with lots of transitions and corners (...


3

If you’re not installing cove base, I would definitely caulk the base to the sheet vinyl...or make sure you never allow teenage girls in your basement bathroom.


3

Unless installing a rigid material such as new plywood, luan, cement board, etc - you generally do not nail it down. When you do, ring shank is the right type of nail. But it has to be a decent quality nail vs. the cheapest bidder, also, the condition of the flooring it is being nailed into is quite important. Just nailing into plywood isn't going to cut it ...


3

Because all the floor coverings you mention expand / contract as the temperature changes, but carpet does not.


3

I personally have never seen vinyl pulled up, after being glued down, come up in a usable condition. Even it it does not rip or tear i find the backing material separates and stays with the glue on the floor.


2

I'm surprised no one mentioned asbestos. Apparently it's common in old/70s vinyl flooring. Stirring it up and be a huge health risk. I plan to get take a sample and get it tested


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