56

DANGER!!! This sounds like a ground fault. They are particularly dangerous if you get wet, which is why Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters have been required for many years in kitchens and bathrooms, among other places. If you have shoes on, you are insulated from the floor. Without shoes, a little bit of electricity makes its way from the fan through you to ...


17

Your pull chain switch is probably starting to fail. The switch and chain wouldn't be grounded because it in a plastic housing so if the switch contacts are leaking over to the chain, that's where your shock is probably coming from.


14

The red wire is the ungrounded (hot) conductor from one switch, while the black wire is the ungrounded (hot) conductor from the other switch. In the original installation one switch would energize the red wire causing the fan to come on, while the other would energize the black turning on the light. With the new fixture, both the fan and light ...


13

Electrical boxes serve several functions. They protect wiring where insulation has been removed. They prevent inadvertent contact with exposed components. They contain sparks when the worst occurs. And they provide standard mounting points for fixtures. I'd be inclined to "code things up" with a wraparound box like so: Nonmetallic ceiling joist box for ...


11

The type of wire you use depends on what kind of circuit you are attaching to. Go to your electrical box, find the circuit for the current light switch, and read what it is rated for (probably 15 or 20 amps). If it is 15 then you use 14-3 wire. If it is 20 then you need 12-3 wire. The "3" will give you an extra red wire and that will be used to separate ...


11

There's no problem at all with what you've done. In fact, that's the way it's supposed to be done. If you were to use two /2 cables, you'd either be paralleling the neutral (310.4), and/or not running all the circuit conductors together (300.3(B)). Parallel neutrals are not allowed in this situation, so you've actually avoided a code violation by doing it ...


11

No, it will not be OK. A fan blade system is meant to be balanced. Even when all of the original equipment blades are in place, minor imbalances can occur and need to be corrected with weights from a balance kit. Failure to have a balanced fan causes wobble. If the wobble is bad enough, it can damage the motor, loosen the fan in its mounting and even cause ...


11

A lot of this comes down to aesthetics and practicality, so you will probably get lots of right answers. Here's my take: I would run your short piece of 2x4 level at the peak alongside 2 of the rafters. You will then be able to use a saddle fan box to mount your fan. This box slides over the 2x4, and is only fastened using a set screw. You then use wood ...


11

I would drill suitable sized holes and fit 4 or even 6 rivnuts in M6 or M8 size. Rivnuts are easily found and once the hole is drilled, you nut them up and they collapse on the far side like a rivet. They take a lot of force to pull out.


10

Yes, you can do that and it will swap the power to the light and fan. Just remember to turn off the power at the breaker before doing any work.


8

Do you have a multi-meter and an extension cord? If you do plug the cord into any outlet then drag it over to the fan and measure between the fan case and a ground pin on the cord... It should read close to 0 resistance.


8

Is this ceiling fan going to fall? There is nothing in the photo that tells me a fall is about to happen, but the installation looks poor, and I think you need to get under that cover. Will it cut your head off? No, if the physical support let’s go, it will dangle by it’s wiring like a wounded buzzard, but probably give you time to get clear. A bonk with a ...


8

First of all, Aluminum wiring is not unsafe in and of itself. When properly installed it's just as safe as any other kind of wiring. Its poor reputation comes from improperly connecting it to switches, outlets, and panels and from making incorrect Cu/Al junctions. As far as your new ceiling fan, if it had Al wiring it would be clearly noted on the product'...


7

That is a recessed light. That flex whip goes to a junction box mounted on the frame of the light. You need to remove the whole light, after removing the circuit cable from the junction box. DO NOT wire the fan box from that metallic flex whip. What you have looks something like this:


7

Okay, stop. The 10-32 screw requirement is for the lower screws which attach the fan to the box, not the upper screws which attach the box to the wood. You can see the holes that the 10-32 screws go into, in those tiny squares to left and right of your photo. It's entirely possible those squares do something clever, like capture a nut. But they are ...


7

Return that bracket and get a box only (no metal bar) rated for a fan. Run a length of 2x4 or 2x6 horizontally across from one rafter to the opposite one. Mount the box on the underside of this 2x. It will have no wobble and you can center it. You don't need bolts to attach this horizontal member; 2 to 4 screws on each end would do. You might need an ...


6

Late response, but posting this for people that happen to google the problem... was probably a bad fan motor capacitor. You can find a replacement for a few bucks on amazon.


6

Use a fan control (dimmer designed specifically for fans) on the power supply to the fan. Common AC electric motors have a high low impedance on starting because velocity is 0, This draws a large initial current to get the motion started and as velocity increases impedance drops increases and the current draw decreases. A dimmer will reduce the wattage ...


6

The bare copper wire and any green insulated wires are meant to be connected together, making it a "party of three" as you stated in your question. That said there is another consideration to take into account as well. These safety ground wires are also meant to be connected to a common ground point of the electrical box as well. If one of these wires (...


6

With another clockwise fan from the same maker, I was able to reverse the direction by interchanging the yellow and black wires as some answers here indicated. The explanation as I understood is that the rewiring changes the winding with which the capacitor is in series and hence the starting direction is inverted. In 3-phase motors, each of the three ...


6

You'll have to look at the inside of the box where the light is mounted. It should have printing inside it - although at the age of the house, it may not. Boxes that can support ceiling fans will be known as "acceptable for fan support": If you don't see something like that, you're going to need to take out some of the ceiling and replace to box with a fan ...


6

It sounds like whoever installed it, used the neutral as a hot and the ground as a neutral. Likely they wanted to control the fan and light separately, but only had two conductor cable between the switch and fixture. If you're installing a remote, you'll only need the two conductors. Without seeing what you have, this is what you might have to do. ...


6

Connect the black wire from the ceiling, to the black and blue wires from the fan/light. Connect the white wire from the ceiling, to the white/black and white/blue wires from the fan/light unit. Connect all bare/green grounding conductors. Cap the red and white/red wires from the fan/light unit. When you're done, the switch will turn on both the light and ...


6

As long as the twist-on wire connectors (colloquially known as "wire nuts", though that's a trademark) were the right size, attached firmly, and left no un-insulated wire exposed, electrical tape over them is unnecessary (and I believe is not recommended).


6

Ceiling fan boxes only have to support 35 lbs. ceiling fans (according to NEC), unless they are designed to support more. In which case they will be marked with the amount they can support, up to the maximum of 70 lbs. So no, I would not recommend hanging a punching bag (assuming a heavy bag) from a ceiling fan bracket.


6

It can be done, but the fan blades will need cleaned more often from any smoke/oil/residue from cooking in the kitchen as compared to elsewhere in the house. That may result in increased wear and tear, so you may end up replacing the unit sooner than if it were somewhere else in the house.


6

There surface mount boxes that are fan rated. You can use one of the back knockouts and the proper connector to bring your cable in from above. Your plan to reinforce with wood above the mounting seems sound. You should not try to mount such a box with just plaster mounted fasteners. You may want to consider steel joist hangers for your crossbeam. Links ...


6

That should be fine. The only question is how many neutral (white) wires are connected and if two, are they connected to separate wires to the fan. If there are two and they connect separately, you should swap them too. As @Jack noted, make sure to turn off the breaker before working; don’t depend on the switches being off.


6

Most of those fans have brackets attached to the sides of the housing that extend and are nailed into the studs. Since it's the motor making the noise, try unplugging it from the housing and removing those silver screws. You should be able to remove the motor and fan impeller. Now try to clean it up and dab a few drops of oil on the motor bearings.Re install ...


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