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5

The middle image clearly shows a nut at the bottom of the recess or hole. Get some deep thin wall sockets and it should come undone easily. Or undo the flathead screws and make the wires safe then break the base. Then remove or grind down the threads...


5

I don't think your plan to make a custom bracket will work for a number of reasons. It's way larger and heavier than necessary, it will be very hard to make a spring clamp of that size to make a pressure clamp, and it will be hard or impossible to slide it on over VHB tape. VHB tape may or may not hold up to the heat generated by the light. It's always ...


4

Yes, that will cut energy use in half, though the type of bulb (LED, CFL, incandescent, one that's not invented yet) does not matter. Of course, you also get half the light. A bulb which is removed does not use any electricity whether or not the fixture is switched on (James Thurber's Grandmother notwithstanding, for the literarily inclined.)


4

You're going to need a deep socket or maybe a needle nosed pliers.


3

I can't be certain from the image provided but it looks like an LED fixture. A lot of times those LED fixtures are made to not have a replaceable bulb (IE the bulb is built into the fixture itself). If that is the case, then the whole fixture would need to be replaced. If you don't have open access to the ceiling (in the case of an open attic above or the ...


3

Either remove the wires entirely, or if it is impossible to do so, remove as much of the cables at most ends obliterate the cables at both ends so they are entirely orphaned in the wall. Don't get your cables mixed up! Then, remove the old junction box entirely. Gone.


2

When you have two switches in this configuration, you have to look at one important detail. Power is supplied to one switch, and the switched power comes off of the other switch and goes to the lights. In your diagram, "from source" wire leads to the switch on the left. The switch on the right has a black wire coming from it that supplies power to the ...


1

Regarding running costs, at a price of 11.5 cents a kilowatt hour a 1 Watt bulb left on all year would cost $1.00. So assuming you only have the light on when its dark, say an average 8 hours a day throughout the year then removing the 3 LED bulbs would save you about $5.


1

If you know it in fact to be a screw-in bulb, you are supposed to grip the face of the bulb and rotate it. You typically grip it with a suction-cup device on a pole. Dakcenturi thinks it's an LED fixture because you can look right through the diffuser and see a row of yellow things. Those look all the world like LED emitters and not at all like ...


1

Ok like with a swagger lamp. It might be possible. A swagger lamp has a connection inside the globe. Some chandeliers have a wiring space where a junction can be made. All junctions need to be in a box or inside the fixture So it may be possible to do it legally by cutting the line and chain it may end up slightly higher depending on the style but now that I ...


1

Doesn't sound like this will be possible. What you have now in the switch box is just a switch loop--hot in and hot out. There's no neutral return path, which would be required for your light. If you were to connect your light to what's there it would probably work, but everything that gets plugged into the outlet thereafter would have its supply voltage ...


1

To me this sounds like a bad connection. My first look is for backstabs prior to the switch or at the switch, it can also be a broken wire sometimes a Knick on the wire when striped the wire can break over time, and last a wire not fully in a wire nut. All of these can show full voltage without a load but once a load (the light) is added it opens. I see ...


1

Traditional "steam" wiring Nope. Cannot get there from here. What you want is simply impossible. The wires you need are simply not present in the places you need them. Your option is to abate the asbestos, replace the inter-light cable with a 12/4 cable, and extend off one of the lights to the additional. Smart switches Naturally, this is easy, and ...


1

Pull down hard and then turn the nut (perhaps use locking pliers) what has probably happened is that a different nut at the top has loosened and is spinning freely along with the shaft, while the bottom nut has frozen up. pulling down will increase friction with the nut and hopefully allow it to unscrew.


1

You have an open neutral somewhere in the line From the meter readings you took with the breaker off, namely no continuity between any pair of wires, even neutral to ground which should have a low resistance between them since they are connected at the main panel, as well as the neutral "ringing" as hot with a non-contact voltage detector, it sounds like ...


1

Why not just remove it at the terminal blocks visible in the background? You may have to pull them out of the wall. These are single-use "backstab" connections. The wire can be removed either by firm pulling or jabbing a screwdriver in the slot release there, but then, the spring will be damaged and will no longer hold reliably. You would need to replace ...


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