55

It was installed incorrectly. It appears what you have in the picture is a knotting anchor. Near the tip of the plastic sleeve is a threaded section. Properly installed, tightening the screw should pull the far end of the sleeve up against the wall, making a thick "knot" that prevents the anchor from pulling through the wall. Since your failed anchor looks ...


30

Absolutely no problem. The screws (actually called "lag bolts") bite into the wood immediately around them, and the wood fibers around that hold the bolt in place. Yes the holes you made already weaken the fibers immediately around them but the amount is insignificant. And, for a flat screen TV like you're describing, the weight you'll be putting on ...


30

The traditional solution for a pulled out towel rack is to remove the towel rack, patch the holes (usu two on each end) and place the rack slightly higher or lower. An experienced or inventive person can patch the existing hole and, by adding reinforcement, remount in the same location. These racks are secured to a pair of metal brackets on the wall with ...


27

If the TV will be on a pivot arm the answer is absolutely not. If it will be tight to the wall, as you say, and generally nobody will be physically handling the TV (tilting or moving, e.g. to plug in game consoles or whatever) then it can be quite safe especially if you use several (4?) toggle bolts along the top edge of the bracket. You don't need them on ...


24

Cut some short strips of plywood or even paneling (long enough to overlap both sides of the hole by a couple of inches). Don't cut your fingers off. Put the plywood strip(s) in the hole and position the strip so it is extending out beyond both edges of the hole, behind the sheetrock. Hold the strip tightly by pulling outward on the back of strip with your ...


22

TL;DR If you mount the shelf supports directly to studs, do that. Just make sure to use long screws - at least 1" into the studs. There are two typical ways to attach a shelf (or heavy mirror or whatever) to a wall with screws: Anchors Anchors are the "plastic things". They come in various sizes/strengths - 30 lb. rating is typical. The way ...


21

Not only will you need to get your local inspector's approval, in writing (and the inspector will defer to Underwriter's Laboratories or other NRTL, so we're talking about getting a UL listing for your one-off) ... ... But all your thermostat wiring must now be re-done in Class I wiring methods Because you are intermixing thermostat control power with ...


21

If you are concerned about the presence of wiring near where you are installing this, grab yourself a stud finder with "live wire" detection from your local hardware store. Entry level models are inexpensive. This way, you can find the studs and the wires. More expensive models may also detect other services (e.g. metal plumbing or gas pipes). If you are ...


20

There's a few things in here so let's cover them one at a time Can I support a TV mount with only drywall? If we're talking a modern TV (i.e. a 2015+ 4k TV) then yes. I recently had my living room TV die and I bought a 65" 4k TV. It weighs perhaps 50 lbs, which is well within the tolerances of drywall using a flush-mount. I would buy either the best ...


18

Yes. They can be however far apart the builder wants them. I have used 3-4 studs within 16" when doing bathrooms, high traffic corner, in bathrooms for showers... and have installed an extra stud because of a previous mistake. I only use magnetic stud finder (finds your screws). If you use a method and you just aren't 100% sure the best thing to do ...


17

I'd try a few of these keyhole mounting plates: You'd need to be very precise with screw placement so everything lines up properly. If you're feeling adventurous, you could chisel or route out a recess so the whole thing is flush against the wall. You could also mount the plates to the wall at a stud, using sufficiently long screws, and then use smaller ...


17

Do not use drywall anchors to hang a TV that large on a swivel mount. If it was a mount that didn't have motion, I might say that's acceptable, but not with a swivel mount. You will need to use wood in some form to add the necessary strength. Plywood can be attached to the wall studs using 3-1/2" lag bolts with fender washers. To provide a clean finish, ...


17

As both bib and Johnny have said, the simplest way to do this is to use two separate ropes. You can either manually pull on both ropes at the same time, or the ropes can be tied together prior to each reaching its first pulley away from the wall (A & B in the image below). Alternately, as Alchymist mentioned in a comment, you can use a single rope with ...


17

It shouldn't be a problem. MDF doesn't have the best screw-holding strength, but TP holders are very light so it shouldn't be an issue. If you are concerned, you could put longer (1") bolts - not screws - through the MDF and put nuts on the back, so you're not relying on the pull-out strength of the MDF to hold the screws.


16

You might consider mounts like z-clips These are listed as 1 7/8 inches high overall, but you might be able to trim the height (a little off the top piece, a little off the bottom) to just a bit less than the thickness of a 2x4, recess them into the back of the piece, leaving a small lip of wood at the top to conceal the mount (the bottom would have to be ...


16

In the US code prohibits the panel from being in the vicinity of easily ignitible material with clothes closets specifically listed NEC 240.24.D. So based on that I would say it's not a good idea.


14

You could also simply redrill new holes to match the framing. 2 or 3 new holes near the ones that are there will not weaken the bar. The holes look oversized for a range of fasteners, you could use smaller holes if you are using 1/4" lag bolts for example.


14

Metal studs? Welcome to the world of the "self-drilling sheet metal screw" Image from "Albanycountyfasteners.com" never heard of them, not associated in any way. You don't need ones with a rubber washer, but this was the first image that wasn't impossible to copy - you can get them with various head types to match your wall mount ...


13

It's going to be more secure to use the studs, but depending on the weight of what you're hanging, it may not be necessary. If you're hanging more than 40+ pounds, I'd go ahead and use the studs. Instead of using wood screws or lag bolts as you would use in wood studs, use toggle bolts similar to the Toggler brand that you mentioned. Starting from the ...


13

Get to the Studs Regular anchors are fine for an ordinary towel bar. But not for a grab bar. For regular anchors to work here, you would need to (a) patch the drywall, (b) install the towel bar with heavy-duty anchors and hope the patch is strong enough to hold them and (c) teach the tenant - and future tenants - to not use the towel bar as a grab bar. The ...


13

Trying to mount an articulating arm that is designed to mount to a single stud will not stand up mounted to that type of wall construction. Even with long lag bolts there is just too much chance that mount will move around and cut into the drywall, become loose and make a mess of things. What you should be doing is to mount a panel of good quality 3/4" ...


12

This happens when bathroom fixtures are only fastened to drywall -- such fixtures are easily ripped out. If you have young children, they will be mysteriously compelled to swing like monkeys from these. Don't ask how I know. Here's how I permanently fix such fixtures: Remove the fixture, if it's still partially attached to the wall. Use a 3" hole saw to ...


11

In theory, a perfectly balanced load and frictionless pulleys would result in a level rise. But lack of balance and friction are always with us. The simplest way to ensure a level rise is to use two separate ropes, tied together on the pulling end, similar to the mechanism for venetian blinds. Note that the load is divided by 4 in the current setup (two ...


11

I wouldn't worry too much. Modern electrical standards have wire stapled an inch and a bit back from the interior of the drywall. If your screws are less than 1.5" long, you shouldn't hit anything. If you are pre-drilling for drywall plugs, only go 5/8" in. It's ideal (and still safe) if you get one screw into a stud. There should be one either on the left ...


10

Why, of course! You're looking for a "magnetic catch". Just you should possibly install it the other way around - a metal plate on the wall, and the catch screwed on the mirror. Images added: Magnet mounted as plug in the cabinet with large head screw contact Magnet in cup washer and mating contact washer mounted with screws Thin magnet to metal plate


10

Now that I see your photo I'd do this differently. I'd install a vertical cleat just behind the faceframe on each side of the cabinet, maybe 1" back (the thickness of the plate plus 1/4"). I'd then span a sheet of 3/4" plywood across them, creating a solid face on which to install your mount. You should have either a cabinet wall or framing to screw into. ...


10

A bunch of ways to do this. What I would probably do myself, which is not what you are currently planning, is: Cut a piece of plywood, probably 3/4" thick, 24" tall by ~ 20" (studs 16" apart) or ~ 28" (studs 24" apart). Mount the plywood with 3 screws on each stud. Paint the plywood to match the wall. It doesn't have to be perfect because it will be mostly ...


10

The general term for a hinge that allows something to move but keep the same orientation is a "pantograph hinge". The general term for that type of bed would be a "Murphy bed". The pantograph mechanism takes many forms, but the trick it uses is to have parallel connecting rods that pivot together so that the door or shelf that it is connected to can swing ...


9

DO NOT DO IT!!!! Chimney vents must not be compromised! All heat and gas related stacks must be left intact. No additional venting or other holes may be put in them. As the comments have noted, you run the serious risk of carbon monoxide poisoning, as well as the risk of chimney and house fires. Find another route well away from the chimney.


9

If you are flexible about the location that the towel bar is mounted then there is a relatively easy path to getting this repaired. There are two main steps involved with this. If you really want to keep the towel hanger in the same location then there is another way you could repair it in place but it involves more work. It's not really hard to do but takes ...


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