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8

THWN is rated for wet locations As Ecnerwal discusses. The issue is thermal The difference is at the top of Table 310.15(B)(16). THWN is allowed 75 degree C running temperature. THWN-2 is allowed 90 degrees C. THHN also is allowed 90 C Southwire is making a disclaimer: they are saying they don’t guarantee #14-10 will be THWN-2. What’s on their mind is a ...


8

Not sure where you got the idea that you need THWN-2, only. All you need is the W. TWN, THWN, RHW, XHW, XHHW, etc. are all perfectly fine, because they have the W that means they are waterproof, that means they can go in outdoor conduit. Most THHN is also THWN and MTW (multiply rated.) If you are in a situation where the wire temperature may be extreme you ...


7

The details of this answer assume you are in North America. If you are elsewhere, you should add that information to your question. Assuming you are correct in the wiring, then no, it is neither legal nor safe currently, though if the wiring is old enough, it may have been "normal" at the time. The problem is that the switch is interrupting the ...


4

Wire expansion/contraction in conduit is quite minimal. I’ve never left more than the few inches you normally get when you don’t straightline through a junction box. Part of the reason 6/3 is so stiff is it’s not intended to be run in conduit. It’s intended for direct underground burial. And it’s stiff because it’s four wires bundled together. It’s not ...


4

On a single-phase, Euro-style connection, neutral and line must be equal - if they were not, your RCD would trip, because looking for unequal line and neutral is how it detects ground faults. If neutral is larger than line, then my only guess is one or more of your neighbors has a broken neutral wire, and their neutral is returning via their neutral-earth ...


4

That is correct. If those are the only wires in the box you have a typical switch loop: You'd simply nut the two wires together, reinstall the switch and plate (or a blank plate) and be happy. However, that switch might come in handy as it is. You could also use one of the small retainers that go under the lower plate screw to lock switch position. That's ...


4

Get a different remote and receiver If you want a remote and receiver that will play nicely with having light switches in the wall that work, you'll need to set what came with your fan aside and get something else instead. My suggestion would be to get a Lutron Caseta fan controller and matching dimmer; they install instead of your existing wall switches ...


4

You can keep the existing wiring and breaker Range loads are computed from their wattage, based on the rules in NEC's Table 220.55. In particular, since 422.10(A) paragraph 4 explicitly permits range loads to be sized as per Table 220.55: Branch circuits and branch-circuit conductors for household ranges and cooking appliances shall be permitted to be in ...


3

There is really no change in underground conduit. Above ground with pvc the conduit itself can change quite a bit steel only ~20% of pvc if I remember correctly. I always have a small service loop it may be an additional 6” to a foot at each end depending on the size box but it is a good idea for several reasons. If you think you need 60 get 65 unless you ...


3

Yes, you can use 15A sockets on 20A circuits, as long as there are 2 or more sockets on the circuit. That is due to a Code exception, that is made just for your application. There are 2 other ways you can do the GFCIs, if you are willing to slow up and do some learning about how downline protection works. (And if you are not willing to learn that, then it’...


3

If I have an issue I add a chair lug and screw it directly to the buss, years ago we used to split the wires into 2 equal groups but I think they quit allowing that back in 99 maybe prior, I usually carry a few single and double lug chair Lugs with my crimps ( I carry probably 50 lbs of different sized crimps) just for this reason. I do agree with George ...


3

Never posted on this site so sorry if my formatting is off but I noticed this post is still active. I was hoping after 5 years you have gotten the solution you were looking for but to shed some light on this in simple terms. Click on the link of the Mike Holt document on Article 800 of the NEC the other person posted. Reference these parts below: 800.110(A)(...


2

Can’t do it. There’s a “Great Wall of China” between the left switch (and its cables) and the right switch. You cannot cross that with any wire, except safety ground. It’s a Code violation, it’s a safety hazard to workmen working on the left circuit... and what’s more, if there are any GFCIs or AFCIs in either circuit, it will trip them. What you might be ...


2

Everything you have observed points at a bad connection with high resistance. When the load is small (voltmeter or neon test lamp), the measured voltage is high, and when there is a larger load, the voltage drops. LED and CFL lights may flicker because they can start with very little current and they have capacitors in their power supplies enabling momentary ...


2

The neutral should be equal to or less than the phase currents. If all loads are line to neutral then the maximum neutral would be equal to the phase, however when using split phase 120v to ground or 240 leg to leg any devices that do not use a neutral would have no neutral currents. So your maximum neutral current will always be equal or less than the ...


2

Neutral currents should not be more than the phase currents. They could be in some individual household circuits if you've got some multi wired branch circuits on the same phase, if you even utilize them. I would verify with the power company what In and Ip actually are and what the units of measurement are. The smart meters I'm familiar with do not measure ...


2

You don't have enough wires for a double switch You don't have enough wires in the wall for a double switch, unfortunately. You'd need a /3 cable (black, red, white, bare) for that, but you only have a /2 cable (black, white, bare), and all the wires in that cable are already spoken for. Maestro to the rescue! However, Lutron makes a solution for this ...


2

You could be seeing a false indication from the NCVT. It happens. Re-check with a volt meter, or try powering the light fixture from just one cable and then from just the other cable. If you find that this light, and perhaps others too, remains off when it's connected to a particular cable that's a good sign that the cable isn't truly powered.


2

For most applications you would use wire in household installations, you don't need the THWN-2. The 90C rating is pointless for anything other than when you need to de-rate wire for having a lot of conductors in a single conduit. Most residential products have terminals rated for 60 or 75C anyway, so you still end up sizing the wire for that anyway, meaning ...


1

Not all commonly used UK cables comply with the harmonised standards anyway. UK flat PVC twin-and-earth (and triple-) cables should comply with BS6004. I can't see any consistency with major suppliers listing either Y or YH type cables.


1

When adding a load and multiple things quit working without tripping a breaker it is normally a back stab that has failed. Back stabs are the push in connectors used on many receptacles , the wire is pushed in and a “edge of a metal” contact is made with the wire. Many times when heated the contact point arcs and looses connection. Some times they start ...


1

Yes you can as long as there is more than one outlet in the circuit or the GFCI is a duplex outlet. You'd want to use an outdoor rated GFCI. Additionally, if you are plugging in a 20 Amp plug, then the GFCI outlet must be 20 AMP. You can install one GFCI and feed the other off of it's load terminals. If daisy chaining from an inside outlet, you can replace ...


1

Your new light probably has insufficient terminals and you're connecting wires which should not be connected, causing a dead short. You need a 4-terminal ceiling rose or connection block: live (red, or brown); neutral (black, or blue); switched live (black with red marker); and earth (bare, sleeved green-yellow). The earths should all go in the brass ...


1

So you currently have the black wires from NM4, NM3, and NM1 connected together, and similarly the white wires from NM4, NM3, and NM1 connected together. What you probably have is power arriving via NM4 and being distributed to other rooms via NM3 and NM1. You can verify this by temporarily disconnecting NM3 or NM1 and observing what parts of your house go ...


1

The way you describe it, the receptacle has: one hot and one neutral (single wire) when switch is on two hot (single and triple) when switch is off That would be functional (as in the light would turn on and off correctly), but dangerous (all the time) by modern standards. The light would go between the three black wires and the single black wire. (two ...


1

Remove the old metal box altogether The “fan light assembly” includes that ring which left in the ceiling, and also the metal junction box which the wires now (I guess?) come into. Normally when you remove a can light, you remove that entire kit-n-kaboodle as an assembly. You carefully disconnect and pull the Romex/NM cables (unsheathed wires, bare wire ...


1

The FMT coming from the box should be grounded. You need to check this with a volt meter. Connect the FMT to a metal fan rated box with the appropriate connector. Then, with the power on, check the voltage from the fan rated box to the black wire from the FMT, you should get 120V+- if the box is grounded through the FMT. Turn power back off. Then take the ...


1

If you want to wire in the switch you've got you need to replace that two conductor romex with a 3 conductor one (3 insulated conductors plus earth) Your supply connection (the short black wire from the wire nut) goes to the side of the switch where the terminals are linked by a brass fin the red and black to the fant-light go to the other side of the switch....


1

Above 8’ the Romex or nmb can be exposed , the only thing I see not 100% is the staple with the wire sideways. It could be 14-3 and round wire but the other pieces look flat so other than that it would meet minimum code but not a nice job that’s for sure. You don’t show the cable going in the garage door opener or light if there are clamps that would be the ...


1

This is a really strange configuration. A better way would have been to have two separate fixture but I'll y to address just returning it to the way it was. You'll need a two bulb fixture with each bulb in it's own socket and individually wired. Then turn off both breakers to the fixture and determine which two wires from each unit control the the light. It ...


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