Hot answers tagged

48

TLDR: an overhead light is a fine "outlet" here. I think the issue is NEC definition of outlet vs receptacle Outlet. A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment. Receptacle. A contact device installed at the outlet for the connection of an attachment plug, or for the direct connection of electrical ...


9

A "lighting outlet" in NEC terms (or possibly black&decker rewording, or old NEC language that may have been updated since that book) includes an overhead light.


8

At this point in time they are both considered duplex outlets. The square ones usually have the word "decor" or "decorator" in the description, and became a decorator item in the 80's. The ones with the hole in the center, for mounting the cover plate have been around since Adam, and have no actual name. The ones you want are readily ...


6

Each entrance to a room needs a switch that can operate a light. It can be by an wired overhead junction box in the ceiling or a switched duplex outlet.


6

Based on your panel pic, it looks like you've got 2 AWG AL wire (green box) of type XLPE. However, the writing is a bit worn, so it's hard to tell for sure. If I'm wrong, I'm sure one of the electricians will be by shortly to let me know. I believe that this is sufficient and appropriate for a 100A breaker, so you should be good to go there. Again, one of ...


5

As FreeMan notes, this is 2 AWG aluminum wire. 2 AWG is allowed 90A, per Table 310.15(B)(16). There's a rumor running around that #2 is good to 100A. That is false, as is plainly evident by the table above. However, the place that falsehood comes from is NEC 310.15(B)(7) -- a whole service to a dwelling are granted an 83% favorable derate -- so a 100A ...


4

#1. Anytime you're into #10 or larger copper, there are better alternatives. #2. Use a receptacle that is rated for 75C thermal, and aluminum. There is nothing wrong with aluminum wire at these larger sizes (#6 and larger). Use Aluminum wire, AWG 6/2 or THHN or XHHW This is rated for 50A if both terminals are 75C thermal rated (breakers are). And well ...


3

Can I use it along with conduit to make 8/2 (with ground)for my application? What throws a lot of folks is that they tend to base amps off the rating for NM-B. Your 8/2 (plus ground) NM-B is only rated for 40 amps, because NEC says NM-B is considered 60° C rated. You cannot use this wire at all here. It must be 6/2 plus ground NM-B cable if you want cable ...


2

Two ground wires usually used when a device has two or more pieces, and ground can be broken or not guaranteed between them. Like a light fixture with a chain holding a lower part or a part separated by plastic.


2

You should not need the Power Extender Kit for this install. The thermostat wire that has the green, white, red, and blue wire will also have a yellow wire in it. I think I even see the nub of cut yellow wire peeking out of the brown cable jacket. To simplify the installation, I would try and use that yellow wire. Trim down the cable insulation on both ...


2

Turns out it was a blown fuse within the boiler itself, no other issues with wiring.


2

You've got the breakers backwards. The breaker in the source (main panel) needs to be small so that it protects the wires. The breaker in the destination (subpanel) needs to be large to avoid nuisance trips. An extreme example would be a 40A breaker on a subpanel connected to a 100A breaker in the main panel. Go to 80A (allowed for continuous usage on a 100A ...


2

Well, if the conduit was competently done, all ends of the conduit pipes will be at accessible access covers (and most access covers have an outlet or switch). Now, the #1 blunder I would expect to see here is someone putting data cables in power conduits. That is a serious code violation. That's super easy to correct, just remove the non-power cables. ...


2

Well, low-voltage and line voltage should be in DIFFERENT conduits, so you can investigate yourself with relative easy and safety, and wiring in conduits should be running between accessible junction boxes, so there would be no need to break walls open. Nor any need to hire an electrician, and if you do, you should look for a "low-voltage electrician&...


2

To clarify a bit: The traditional style goes back a long time. Unfortunately, I'm not sure how long, but sometime in the early 20th century. This includes the "duplex with a screw in the middle" for receptacles and a small slot for a simple toggle switch for lighting (can be used for appliances too). Sometime in the 1970s, Leviton started selling ...


2

There will be continuity between red and the metal box, once you install the switch into the box. The mounting screws on a switch are a perfectly legitimate way to ground a switch. The green screw on the switch is connected to the yoke on the switch, which in turn is connected to the screw, the metal box and the jacket on the BX. So it's possible someone is ...


1

If the fan doesn't come with a remote, it will have three wires to connect. A neutral, a hot for the light kit, and a hot for the fan. Any fan without a remote should be a direct replacement for your existing fan. The new ceiling fan might require a new light dimmer if you plan on using LED bulbs or it requires energy saving bulbs. As far as I know, fan ...


1

By NEC you could protect 1/0 AL at 100A at both ends. Loading it to 80A would result in a 5.3% voltage loss, which would leave you in great shape. Loading #1 to 80A would result in 6.7% loss, which is more than "recommended" by the NEC, and if branch circuit length in the shop are excessively long you could suffer greater loss that could effect ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible