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5

Let's do the math. You are building an appliance that runs on mains electrical supply. It will be a water feature. And you're giving it to someone else. Do you own a copy of the UL White Book? Do you know how to do this safely? Will it have a GFCI cord? Rethink this thing in low-voltage LED lights are readily available in 12 volts DC (the ...


4

I don't think it's legal to power an outlet that's not in the kitchen off of one of the 2 required kitchen branch circuits (i.e. counter outlets). I think it would be OK to tap off of the un-switched side of a light circuit for the kitchen. Since you have access through the attic, is there another general purpose branch circuit (that is non-kitchen) that ...


4

The NEC only allows a single feeder to a building (NEC 225.30). If you want seven 20A circuits you would need to run a single set of 4 larger wires to an electrical panel, drive a ground rod (or rods depending on local interpretation) and break out your circuits from there. A good plan would be 3/#6 + 1/#8 ground being fed by a 60A breaker in 3/4" PVC. If ...


4

You can, but only if the breaker is 15 amps, and it creates possible confusion for someone who looks at the breaker box and thinks "huh, that's 12GA, I can change that to a 20A breaker." So you might want to leave that person a note in the box.


3

Your "3 hots + 3 neutrals terminating in 1 subpanel" is paralleling. You can't do that, NEC 366.20, unless a bunch of things are true, starting with The wires must be 1/0 or greater (so 125A per parallel) The supply end of the cable must be special equipment rated by the manufacturer specifically for paralleling. Typically this special equipment will ...


3

Your voltage drop is almost the same for a 240v feeder at 100’ at a full load. 1.84% with copper and 1.91% for aluminum. I would save a few bucks and go with aluminum for a residential feeder, code had no hard standard for voltage drop but the recommendation is 3% at the sub and 5% an the end of the branch circuit. Remember you need 4 wire , 2 hot a ground ...


2

You circuit is wired without bringing the neutral wire to the switch box and so only the HOT wire comes to the switch and the switched wire goes back to the fan. For a traditional (i.e. dumb) switch, this works fine. When you try to use a "smart" switch, and your electronic timer switch is such a switch, you have to supply power to the switch itself and ...


2

Take that range cord back and get the correct cord for the job 50A generator inlet boxes, as well as many generators with 50A outputs, do not use anything resembling the NEMA 14-50 that is certainly on the end of your range cord. Instead, they use locking type connectors; unfortunately, there is no such thing as a NEMA L14-50, so California had to step in ...


2

Don't paint yourself into a corner... again "24 space full, 32 space will suffice"... A common theme on this forum is the size of subpanels. Having a full panel is a difficult, expensive and frustrating problem as you well know. Wouldn't it have been keen if it could have been avoided for the price of a couple latté's? Well, it is, and it can. And ...


1

You may be miscalculating voltage drop The first rule of voltage drop is: Calculate voltage drop based on the actual, normal circuit load, not breaker trip. Suppose you have 7A of lighting, but only 3A will be realistically on at one time, on a 15A trip. What number do you punch into the voltage drop calc? The second rule of voltage drop is: 3% is ...


1

If each apartment can make it on 125A, I would leave it be. You need a third service anyway for commons space loads, unless there are none or very few and you are doing something clever like installing a solar/battery system for those. Otherwise yes, you will need to replace with a 3-unit 200A meter; two for the apartments and one for the commons loads. ...


1

It's called feeder not service, unless it has a separate meter and electric bill. Your trench needs to be 20" to give 18" of required cover over top of the conduit. At only 100' you don't need to worry about a wire size bump for voltage drop. If you are running cable for your feeder, your numbers are correct. If you are running cable in conduit, that ...


1

It appears the danger-close part is the "wing" on the garage door track diagonal brace. That wing is essential for strengths/stiffness. But structurally, that brace doesn't care if the wing sticks out that way, or the other. I would just flip it over/put it on the other side, so the wing sticks out the other way.


1

C is definately number 2, check for markings on the device. My bet is on it being the one with the red wire (because the diagram shows 2 wires to "C") for live and neutral measure the resistance from the plug. Also look at where the wires go compared to the diagram. But, if forced to guess brown is live and blue is neutral, it's an international colour ...


1

Using a washer probably isn't a good idea. The screws on those terminals are critical and must work exactly right. The tightness of those screws makes the electrical connection secure and keeps it secure over months and years subject to heat, humidity, and vibration. If that connection is loose, it is not safe. You might be able to figure out what's ...


1

Are the tabs on the outlet intact? I am thinking the outlet prior may have a broken tab so the feed is not making it to this outlet. Many times only 1/2 of a switched outlet is switched we snap the tab between the top and bottom screw on the hot side take the switch to 1 and always hot to the other. In the case with 2 cables or 2 blacks and 2 whites in the ...


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