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4

The proper way is indeed to pigtail ground wires from that bundle to each switch. They should be wired in such a way that detaching ground from one switch (to replace it, for example) doesn't impact the grounding of the other switch or anything down the line. If this makes your bundle of grounds large, you may need to upgrade to a larger wire nut. The wire ...


4

Slow down on the hole size, unless using a conduit nipple the inspector will usually call more than 2 cables through a hole bundling (where 2 or more cables are run without spacing) so a massive hole for 8-10 ea 12 or 14 gauge cables just won’t work. Next more than 3 current carrying conductors will require derating. Drilling a series of 3/8 -3/4 holes is a ...


4

Your support plans are fine; just make sure your feeder breaker is 90A or less SER cable used for feeder or branch-circuit duty is treated exactly the same as a (rather fat) NM cable for support and installation-technique purposes, albeit without the 60°C working temperature limit on ampacity calculations: (4) Installation Methods for Branch Circuits and ...


3

So long as the total draw of all devices plugged in remains below the amp capacity of the power strip, the extension cord, the permanent wiring, and the breaker, you'll be fine. I believe the admonition against plugging in a power strip is that You are not allowed (by NEC) to use an extension cord for permanent wiring. i.e. if you need an outlet on the ...


3

Your system has no "C" wire brought out to the connector. This is not uncommon as many systems don't. If you need a "C" wire, you'll want to connect it here:


2

I'd use a 4/0-4/0-2/0-4 Mobile Home Feeder cable for this job Given that you aren't going to be pushing a full 200A over the cable (which'd require 250kcmil Al, since the 83% reduction in 310.15(B)(7) doesn't apply to your situation), but need a 4-wire cable as your shed is getting powered by a feeder from your service disconnect at the pole, I'd use a 4/0-4/...


2

It may be possible to add a circuit and split where things are fed from. The best option would be to add heavy duty covers or in use covers with proper seals as code requires on outside receptacles in wet locations this keeps the receptacles dry so they won’t be the cause of the trip. If the garage is attached to the home adding circuits is much easy and ...


2

Those testers detect electromagnetic fields. It's downstream of a dimmer There are three dimmer technologies. Variacs are a variable transformer which steps down voltage, giving a sine wave, but they are huge and heavy. Rheostats are a variable resistor that adds impedance, giving a sine wave, but they make stupefying amounts of heat. Both of these, being ...


2

12 Gauge. 3 Conductor. USB devices are so low current I wouldn't worry about them. You can plug in as many things as you want as long as the total current is below the cord's specification.


2

Correct. This welder has given you a real "jack-a-doodle" set of specs that make no sense at all. Running 120V/15A is only there so if you have light jobs, you can get 'em done using existing circuits... if you were wiring in a new circuit just for the welder, you would NEVER run 120V, since 240V is a possibility. What's more, 30A+ 120V sockets ...


2

You MUST attach the ground to the metal box FIRST. You can pigtail, but what you can't do is take ground to the receptacle only. The receptacle will automagically pick up ground off the metal box in certain circumstances. the box screw ear, and receptacle, have hard flush clean metal contact, with the screws bottomed out (not floating on drywall ears; no ...


2

Take the #10 AWG ground from your cable and loop it to your metal box with a 10/32 grounding screw. There should be a threaded hole for this in the box. Extend the ground outward an attach it to your outlet.


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The fact of the sockets being 15A (common) instead of 20A (T-neutral) is nothing to worry about. 15A receptacles are allowed on 20A circuits, per NEC 210.21, provided there are 2 or more sockets. I mean sockets not receptacles: The common-as-dirt 2-socket receptacle is 2 sockets. Interestingly, a Wiremold outlet strip counts as 1 receptacle even though it ...


1

All grounds should be connected together. You can make pigtails from box screw, each switch and connect it all together with feeder ground. If you using wire nuts, they have different sizes and capacity usually written on package. Just choose properly size, it is going with number.


1

#12 means 12 AWG wire size. That's a very beefy extension cord and you should be alright for anything that won't trip a 15A breaker (or a 20A breaker for that matter). You are welcome to unfurl the extension cord for a day or a week to power the shed, but you need to believably plan to coil it up and put it away soon. If you are aiming to bring permanent ...


1

According to the Legrand spec sheet they have lots of variants available, including 12 AWG or 14 AWG, and including alternating receptacles between two circuits. So if you get the right stuff then there is no problem satisfying both the 20 A rule (by using 12 AWG wire and connecting to 20 A breakers) and the 2 circuit rule. Of course, you may have additional ...


1

Two ways to connect 3-way switches and load. Firt feed and load in same junction box. Second feed and load connected in different boxes. In second only three wires run between boxes: two travelers and one phase return. So two wires live voltage.


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I am adding a new answer instead of editing as my original answer still is my recommendation since I don’t know your local AHJ. The 2020 code has updates on MC/AC bundling, with focus in 1 area of code usually other methods are also more closely examined at the professional level and DIY more so. Code allows cables to be run together but because of ...


1

Your plan has a good chance of succeeding as I have done similar work and was successful. I would suggest adding a new junction box, old work box, close to your existing outlet. You can't just go around eliminating outlets because you need the box. Code requires where you need to put them. Just add a new box, pigtail the feed from the existing outlet to the ...


1

Remember: the run from service panel to first AFCI must be either metal-jacketed cable or metal conduit. I would find that drawing very confusing. It's always a struggle to show neutral on a white background (hint: don't), but what ere they thinking? White is the legally required neutral color, and black is the conventional hot color. So that bung ...


1

I don't think it would be a good idea. It would be vital you to know the possible ambient temperature of the space you are running you're conductors or cabling while the heater was running. Basic apprenticeship instruction teaches that heat has the greatest effect on the function of your circuitry. NEC Table 310.15(B)(2) shows the multiplier you should use ...


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