Hot answers tagged

11

Yes, this does sound like a problem. Assuming your panel is like most, the breakers are on the same phase and you have two problems: No Common Shutoff MWBC is required to have common maintenance shutoff. That means if you turn off one breaker to work on the circuit, the other is turned off too. That is important for safety. This can be done with a handle-tie ...


11

The available colors are considerably more than that through any decent supplier. Get out of the big box (heck even the big box near me carries more colors than that) However, at the most basic... You don't need a grounding wire since you have EMT which is a grounding conductor, but if you do choose to have a grounding wire it has to be green or bare, and ...


9

99% of my work is in EMT conduit. Neutrals MUST be white or gray. Ground wires are green, yellow-green-stripe or bare, but you don't need em in EMT conduit. Hots are everything else including yellow or pink. Any competent electrical supply stocks all 11 colors in solid or stranded THHN. Stranded is much easier to work with if you can figure out the craft ...


9

Don't do that! What you're proposing, using two 15A breakers as a substitute for one 30A breaker, is called Circuit Breakers in Parallel and is the topic of NEC 240.8: 240.8 Fuses or Circuit Breakers in Parallel. Fuses and circuit breakers shall be permitted to be connected in parallel where they are factory assembled in parallel and listed as a unit. ...


8

Partial answer: the larger cable is Belden 8290 shielded twin lead TV antenna cable, which was introduced the 1960s and so is probably original to the house. It's been literally years since I posted this question so in all likelihood nobody will happen upon this, but while working in my attic today I uncovered an old UHF/VHF antenna that was laying on the ...


8

If you use cable, you are limited to the 60°C rating, so 6/3 isn't big enough for 60A - you'd have to go with 4/3 If you use conduit, and the terminations are rated for 75C, 6 (THHN) is fine. Also, if you use metal conduit, you don't need a grounding wire. The metal conduit is the grounding conductor. Since it's less than 24 inches long, (a "nipple"...


6

I would be placing a junction box in the attic and only running 1 line down to each receptacle. Running up and down is a waste of wire and if the walls are not open a lot more work fishing metal clad can be a pain in the back side especially if there is insulation. Having a 4x4 box makes a great junction box get a deep box with all 1/2 or 1/2 -3/4 TKO and ...


6

Our power into US houses is 240V single-phase, with a center tap. The center tap is called neutral. This is called "Split-phase" since you can grab the outer "phase" wires (hot-hot) or grab one phase and neutral for half the voltage. If you're wondering, this was Edison's idea when power was DC. The plug you need on the saw is a NEMA 6-...


5

Why would you even want that? Push-in (we call them "backstab") connections are notoriously unreliable. They are the direct cause of most "some of the outlets on the circuit went dead" type problems. Those result in a great deal of wheel-spinning for the novice DIY homeowner, as well as a lengthy "bug hunt", since it's a 50/...


4

You can do it any way you want. I would run several EMT short conduits. What I would do, however, is run 3-4 short EMT conduits between the 2 panels. "Gee, that would require learning a new craft and buying $6 worth of fittings, why would I do that?" The EMT conduit takes care of all grounding. No ground wires at all needed. It makes it EASY to ...


4

The two codes that you'll need to mind in the US are the building code and the electrical code. The electrical code wants your bored holes to be at least 1-1/4" away from the edge face of the studs so the cables are safe from drywall screws etc. If you need to bore a hole closer, you can use a protective plate, readily available at any hardware store, ...


4

There is no two-phase. Single or three. The single phase in this case is 120V hot to neutral/ground, 240V hot to hot. 220V is a somewhat outdated nomenclature for the US system, but in most cases your tool has adequate tolerance to take 240 without problems. In other countries with different systems, it might be 220, 230 or 240V (perhaps even 250) and it ...


3

The following is all for a "typical 240V circuit in a 120V/240V US system". For all practical purposes, that is what is referred as "single phase". There is a split (to get 2 x 120V out of 240V) but it is still just really single phase. The alternative is "three phase", which is unusual in residential applications. I am a bit ...


3

International Residential Code §R602.6 covers drilling & notching studs and top plates. No clue if that's the adopted building code in your area, but it's a good starting point. You can drill or notch the top plate up to 50% of its width. That's more than enough for the MC. If you ever need a bigger notch/hole for other projects (e.g. plumbing), the ...


3

You have to use something when ever NM cable enters a metal box or enclosure to protect the cable from abrasion. If you use a clamp for two cables, it must be rated for two cables of the applicable size. For example the Arlington NM94 is made for a 1/2" trade size knockout and can be used with one or two 14/2 or 12/2 NM cables.


3

You can't do that. But that doesn't make any sense. If you have two 15A breakers unused for anything, why wouldn't you just pull them out and replace with a 30A breaker? If the circuits are still being used for other things, then again, stop and think. If the other loads on the circuits are so small that the 30A thing can use most of their capacity, then ...


2

To add to the other answer, your two phases are 180 degrees out of phase so that it creates what is called destructive interference Now this doesn't totally fit because your electricity is all flowing in the same direction, but the same principle holds. Note that wave A and wave B are completely canceled out. Even with the two waves running in the same ...


2

Yes, that will do it. Just remember to turn off the breaker and test wires to make sure they are not energized.


2

There are several ways to connect 3 way switches. I always prefer the 2nd method you posted. There is no "code taping" needed, since all the wires are already the correct color. The 2nd method is so simple and straightforward: Power in to one switch, x/3 to the next switch then to the fixtures. Sometimes it's not practical due to length of ...


1

I can't tell how the existing stat is wired nor whether you updated your description but assuming this is correct: L1/Black/Line is connected to the bottom black L2/Black/Line is connected to the bottom white T1/Red/Load is connected to the top and middle blacks T2/Red/Load is connected to the top and middle whites Then it SOUNDS like the bottom black and ...


1

Supply == Line == T1, T2 old stat (if you typed correctly), L1, L2 New stat you show a picture of. Load == Load == L1, L2 old stat (if you typed correctly), T1, T2 New stat If there's nothing else on this circuit, line is the single wire, load is the two wires, one to each heater. If there are other things on the circuit, could be different - line could be ...


1

Those two 50A single breakers need to be handle-tied, or replaced with a 50A 2-pole breaker. You can't have two singles on a 240V load like that. The empty breaker space at bottom left should be filled with a proper UL-listed thing. They make blank filler plates, but I find them flimsy and expensive. I just use actual breakers, a CH120 is around $5. (1) ...


1

you have to come off of the Outlet. the Light will need a neutral install your 2 wire with ground from the plug to the ceiling location.(14 or 12/2 nm-b) at the outlet wire the black from the switch to the ceiling light black. and the Neutral to the ceiling light White. get a new outlet and install to have direct power. also tie all the grounds together.


1

Neutral is required at the celing light box. You can't wire up a celing light with just the hot and ground from the switch. It will work, but is dangerous and violates electrical code. Your best bet here is to fish a new /2 cable from the box with the switched outlet up to the celing since this box has the required neutral, (switched) hot, and ground. If you ...


1

Yes, you just need to add an appropriate clamp, like: You should be able to get them at any hardware store/home improvement big box store/etc. An electrical supply house will be cheaper, but for an occasional clamp just go "anywhere".


1

Open hot in the garage feeder What you are seeing points to a break, or open, in one of the hot wires going from the main panel to the garage. With the all-too-common setup of a directly buried cable, this isn't all that uncommon a failure mode. I'd first turn the breaker going to the garage off and undo and redo the terminations on both ends of the cable ...


1

What you are asking and how you are relating the response are both wrong. Hospital or not 3 amps is a tiny load even if you had a 5 amp breaker in the panel you would not see a drop in voltage until the breaker tripped this value is almost always above the stamped value on the breaker of 15a or 20a for almost all receptacles in a patient area. Even if your ...


1

I agree with the comments saying you should have an electrician do it. As pointed out by @Ecnerwal they will be able to advise before you decide which appliance to buy and help you make an informed decision. The key factor will be the size of the cable to your existing hob. It depends on the power of the new hob, the distance to the fuse box and whether the ...


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