Hot answers tagged

19

Looks like a standard install. You can only run so many wires in a hole without de-rating the circuit capacity. The holes are set back at least 3/4" from the stud surface, add 1/2" for drywall and you get 1 1/4" the length of the drywall screws. Even if the drywall screw goes into the same line as the hole it isn't long enough to penetrate the wire. If ...


8

Sure, you can always upsize the wire. However, a dramatic upsize introduces two complications. the much-larger wire will not fit on the device. It will need to be pigtailed to a suitably sized wire, such as a 6 AWG. When dealing with #1 wire, it's not as simple as using a giant orange wire-nut the size of a salt shaker. You have to use a connector ...


4

It sounds like you're on the right track. There are several green wires in the pictures, so I took the second picture and labeled them. Small green wire (#1) This one is bolted to the dryer's case in the first picture, but loose in the second one. It's meant to connect internal equipment (probably the timer/computer) to the case so it has a ground. It ...


3

The wiring in your wall is called a "traditional switch loop". The two wires present (besides ground) are always-hot (we hope, the white) and switched-hot (we hope, the black). Note that neutral is NOT present in this box. This is a case of white being used as a hot wire because the cable only has 2 conductors. Modern Code requires a re-tasked white wire ...


3

Neutral Required Many (not all) smart switches, timers, motion sensors, etc. require a neutral. That is because they need to get power even when the switched device is off. Some older switches were designed to leak power through the device even when "off", but that does not work well with LED lights, so needing a neutral at the switch has become more common ...


3

You can run larger cable and use a smaller breaker but not the other way around. If your planning on 1 AWG for 100 Amps then you're talking about aluminum cable. You'll have to pigtail at both ends to a 8 AWG because the 1 AWG won't fit in the 40 Amp breaker or receptacle. That future 100 Amp load could be a strain on your panel so check into that along with ...


2

Yes, having larger wire is always fine. Depending what size wire the terminals on the 40 amp breaker are listed for you might need a pigtail of wire that fits that breaker connected to your 1 AWG, but that's a common problem with a straightforward solution. You should consider using aluminum wire for a run this big, if you are presently looking at copper.


2

Get a different sensor (or replace the wiring in the wall) You have an old-style switch loop, where the black wire is the hot, the white wire is the switched hot, and the bare wire is ground, of course. Notice what's missing from this description? Neutral, that's what! This is because a mechanical light switch has no use for a neutral wire; however, your ...


2

In passing: When things go wrong they go very wrong. Consider the following scenario: Window well pump ingests a bundle of leaves, and clogs. Water rises. Water gets above the lower plug. GFCI trips. Water continues to rise. Now it covers the live screws of the GFCI Depending how clean the water is you may not have enough current to trip the ...


1

This is worth confirming, but in my experiences, all makers of engineered lumber has install guides to direct where and how big holes can be made in their products. These are available on line at the manufacturers website. If I knew the brand and the material in question I could look it up, but....


1

Please see my comment on your original question but yes, direct buried cable can be spliced with the correct components. Check with a local electrical supply shop (not a big-box home center) and get their advice on the correct product for your local area and the wire you are splicing. Here is a link to an example of this type of product: Direct Burial ...


1

You can divide this problem into 2 aspects: First, protecting the lumber integrity when running wires. Second, protecting the electrical wires from damage. For load bearing studs (there are less stringent standards for non-load bearing), here are the key (U.S. - you can extrapolate for Canada) requirements for 2x4 studs under 10 feet in length: LUMBER ...


1

I called an electrician. They had to snake a wire all the way back to the adjacent room and put a box with a blank on it.


1

These are al 12v lights, and 12v is pretty safe to work with. There should be nothing wrong with splicing all the positive wires and negative wires to one cable that then hooks up to the battery. Because they are LED lights running on DC current, polarity matters, and it might not be obvious on the wires which is positive and which is negative so pay ...


1

It's a Lutron dimmer with night light. First, that should never have been used to control an outlet. You must not put dimmers on outlets, because if someone plugs in a non-lamp, the power-shaping issues can cause equipment to dramatically overheat and start a fire. If you have any more dimmers controlling receptacles, remove them now and fit standard ...


1

I believe Mirinth's answer is correct, the thick green/yellow stripe wire is a ground strap and the smaller green wire is an electronics ground. Here's why: I have a Samsung unit, model DVE52M7750W, with a similar panel. All the wiring in this unit's panel matches yours except the ground strap is a white wire, instead of green/yellow stripe and there is an ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible