New answers tagged

1

You blew another “fuse” Well, it’s not meant to be a fuse. It’s meant to be a solid wire splice. But it was weak to begin with, but the high draw from your adventure finished it off. it’s a wire connection either at the last outlet that is working, or the first outlet that has failed. You’ll need to check both of them. Often, you can’t clearly identify the ...


0

With only 7-8 volts your hot has opened some place unless using a low z meter. When the neutral opens with a normal meter many times you will read 120-50v but just a few is a sign that a connection at a wire nut probably failed unless using spring tension blocks wago is a popular brand and they normally work well unless there is a catastrophic failure (...


1

Copied from my comment as an answer: I took off the working closet light and it is a black/white wire going to the fixture. I traced this wire back to the ceiling box and the black wire goes to #4, white goes to #1. Red wire in #1 is always hot, black wires in #4 are hot when the light is on. Wired my fixture the same as the wire to the closet light - black ...


6

I would not worry about adding a “wire” to the switch either the box grounded those nice bright brass yokes being connected to the metal box will be more than enough grounding (in the US it is code compliant to use this same method with some devices). Your switches look to be in exceptional condition I hope the contacts are also if so they may last another ...


2

First, the outlet is just a red herring; it is just an older style of outlet. There’s more going on in this box than you know Note the extra black wires that you haven’t discussed at all. What’s actually happening is that one black-white pair is delivering power from supply. The other black-white pair is delivering power onward to another point-of-use. The ...


2

That's a combination 120/240v outlet that could be wired for 120 volt or 240 Volt. You're wired for 120 Volt so just turn off the power, remove the old outlet and get your regular grounded outlet and hook the red, switched hot, to the brass screw and the two whites to the silver screws. A better way to work with the two neutrals would be to pigtail both ...


5

From your pictures, I don't see the third conductor. Is there a red wire that we aren't seeing? From what I can see it looks like he was daisy-chaining the outlets by creating a pigtail. Since he didn't use the second set of terminals (or the first for that matter, not the way I would have done it) You can just pull power directly off the screw terminals. ...


4

This problem is most easily addressed by surface mount wireway. Rather than run exposed cables, you attach a fairly innocuous plastic or metal rectangular cross section wireway/duct/conduit that carries the cables across the ceiling and/or wall in a less obtrusive way than putting them out in the open, but which does not require major surgery to the building ...


3

The 2 blacks From the switch go to the red and orange. Doesn’t matter clip the reds straighten and use a wire nut to combine the 3 wires. Then black to orange with a wire nut. The white on the switch goes to that group of whites If you have a white on the switch, last the green to the ground or bare copper. That it was a 3 way doesn’t matter if the other ...


3

If the wiring was done properly in 1963, it should be fine carrying 20A in 2020. 1963 is hardly the dark ages, electrically. A 12Ga copper circuit from that era, IF properly constructed (tight connections, etc.) does not need the wire changed from old age. If anything is likely to need to be changed from aging, it would be the receptacles, and that's not a &...


0

Why not just go and buy some new ones. You will get the look you want and might be safer.


1

Normally when there is a switched receptacle only 1 of the 2 are switched. The cable that is black , white, red & ground. the white is neutral Silver screw . the red goes to the switched hot Brass in color. the tab between the top and bottom is broken on the hot side or the side that has the red and black wire. The black wire normally always hot Is on ...


4

You just answered your own question, “how do I splice 30 connections” / “breaker box for DC”. However only one breaker box/service panel/load center on the market is capable of supporting DC, and that is Square D’s “QO” type (the one with the 3/4” breakers; NOT the cheapie Homeline!) The trick is voltage drop. The much lower voltage is also much more ...


2

Voltages as low as 12 V are generally not used to distribute power in houses because the losses in wiring increase as the voltage drops (for a given power), so you will waste energy and have poorly running motors if you used the same wire sizes you might use for distributing AC to the same places. You can compensate for this by increasing the wire size, but ...


3

Use switch cleaner spray to clean any gunk away, then use a silicon grease with a small craft paint brush.


0

He could very well be right. When bearings inside the compressor start to bind up due to age, they increase the running amps. Once that amperage exceeds the breaker size for a period on time, the breaker will trip. Eventually, your run amps will equal your locked rotor amps which can be three times the normal running amps. Things to check first would be all ...


2

The incoming cable’s ground wire goes to the junction box. It does not go to the lamp. If you want to bring a ground wire through that hole you are drilling, it either needs to pigtail off the above grounds, or go to a second ground screw hole you add to the box. You can add a ground screw to a junction box by drilling a hole correct for a #10-32 tap, then ...


2

If all you want to do is disconnect the switch A and put a blank in it's place then remove the wires from the switch and connect the yellow wire to either orange, and cap off the extra orange. If that makes switch B upside down then swap the oranges at switch A location. If you intend on eliminating the junction box for switch B or eliminating the conduit ...


2

Turn off all power before starting any work. OK switch B can remain in place but you have to determine which of the two orange travelers is hot when switch B is in the top (ON) position, then disconnect and tape the other orange wire. Remove switch A and wire nut the yellow wire to the hot orange that you did not disconnect from the other switch. Tape the ...


-1

There is a type of dry lubricant that is easily accessible and can lubricate your switch. A pencil (aka Graphite). You generously write over the area where you need lubricated, use the switch a few times, and keep doing it until it starts working again. The graphite works great as a lubricate and doesn't "leak" everywhere. Graphite does conduct ...


7

I would spray it with contact cleaner. And then cycle the switch several times. That should clean out any gunk interfering with the operation.


2

I wouldn't. Most oils are flammable. Those that are not are usually toxic. Substances that are used to improve contacts don't generally deal with interrupting contacts. Expect soot buildup. Any (organic) liquid may degrade the primitive plastic of the buttons. And finally, you have a better course of action: Disassemble it and see where the moving parts have ...


8

I would use dielectric grease, which is widely available at auto parts stores. Apply to blades, contact points and pivot points with a toothpick, bamboo skewer or other applicator. Work the mechanism a few times and apply a little more. Power off, of course.


1

I had the exact same problem - ceiling fan would trip two GFCIs on a totally different circuits. I was going to test all the components all the way up to the ceiling fan to fix the problem. Replaced the 3 position fan speed control-Problem persisted. Replaced the GFCI with a different brand of GFCI - PROBLEM FIXED. The original GFCIs must have been way ...


0

...and I have an 230v nearby oultet which has 2 wires black + white and the ground , this outlet is plugged to 50A breaker in the eletrical switchboard, the wall outlet model is NEMA 6-15 250v A NEMA 6-15 receptacle is only rated for 15A, so if it is connected to a 50A breaker, that is dead wrong and an immediate fire hazard. If the conductors are rated for ...


13

Oil, no. Lubricate, yes. Common oils have multiple problems for electrical devices, the worst of which is possible flammability. You can get specific electrical "contact lubricant" for this though. It is usually not sold in hardware stores, you may have to order it on-line and the smallest package will be a lot more than you need, but don't ...


1

Sometimes it's just easier to move the box. You'll have to drill a hole large enough for a nonmetallic bushing or a romex connector. Get a 2' piece of romex 14/2 with ground and splice it in the junction box. Pull the romex into the fixture bracket and hook the romex to the fixture wires.


2

Yes you can cut the hole but you need some protection for the wire coming through the hole I would find a large snap in gromet drill a hole to fit the gromet I would move that 10-32 green screw to the point the wire comes through and tie your ground there but you can make a jumper in this case with a wire nut. You need to protect the wires from getting cut ...


0

You attach the ground wire from the supply cable to the metal box. Always. If the lamp has a metal frame, and the box is metal, it can ground itself through the mounting screws. Otherwise you’ll need a 3-way pigtail between a pigtail off the box, the supply wire, and the lamp’s ground.


1

For the sub panel sometimes you can get a better deal on a 150 amp panel your panel really cannot be two large. Yes you will need a 4 wire feed but your main panel will dictate the size feeder wires , if I was doing this and could get a 125a breaker to feed my shop I would do it, however many panels will max out at 100 amp so size your feeder wiring on the ...


1

I think the intent of the instructions is to emphasize that the bracket needs a proper ground connection, particularly that the mounting screws even on a metal box don't satify the requirement. If your metal box is fed by NM cable (Romex) or conduit with a ground wire then the box needs to be grounded too. If the ground from the cable is long enough you can ...


1

A typical US wall receptacle is a 15A receptacle, and is connected to a 15 or 20A circuit breaker. So a little math shows it would use 45% or 33% of a the capacity of a circuit. This size of load requires some caution. If when the AC cycles it causes brown-outs or trips a breaker you should find another place for the AC. But really you should be fine as long ...


1

The minimum for any 115V outlet should be 15A. But you should be able check that by finding the circuit breaker for that circuit at the panel and checking its current rating. The problem you'll possibly run into is if there are OTHER high-current devices on that same circuit. If both that and the AC run at the same time you may get a breaker trip.


2

At the hob location, disconnect the existing single cooker outlet connector. Loosen the terminal screws, withdraw the wires, undo the screws at left and right and pull the connector plate forward. At the hob location fit a dual outlet connector https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/AA45DCOP.html Available from any good electrical supplier. over the existing ...


2

That's an excellent question and it can be quite confusing. If you're using a plastic box, it won't have a ground screw, just connect the two ground wires together. If you're using a metal box, there will be a ground screw. In this case, your idea will work just fine. You could also wire a "pig-tail". That would be the ground wire coming in with ...


1

There's a suggestion from a coworker that this is a "Tamiya connector" used in RC cars for battery power connections From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamiya_connector Although my rangehood plugs appear to be reverse polarity of the DC battery example, and there's a worrying difference between 7~14 volts DC and 240VAC. UPDATE Turns out that I ...


1

Your setup seems very well thought-out. You’ve done your homework and gotten 99% of it correct IMO. 12 or 14 AWG THHN/THWN-2 wire (white, black, green) or 14/2 UF-B (which I already have, but may not have enough of) Cost difference in UF 12 vs 14 is enough to care about. Cost difference in THHN 12 vs 14 is not significant. UF in conduit is usually a bad ...


1

1" conduit is fine, but it needs to be conduit Your plan to use 1" PVC conduit is alright, but it needs to be conduit, not plumbing pipe, with an expansion joint at both the ground-end and at the shed-end to control for ground motion. You'll want to use prefabricated sweeps for the underground bends, with a LB for the aboveground direction change ...


2

Wow, whoever installed that subpanel was just trying to get paid. Did not do you any favors at all. It would have added less than $20 to that job to give you a 20-space and a 70A feed, that you could’ve done something with. As it is, the panel is “maxed out”, even overloaded, with washer/dryer going at once. I don’t understand why you have two washer/dryers....


3

Upgrade that tiny sub-panel. For under $200 you should be able to get a 30-space Eaton panel that will let you re-use all the breakers in your existing 8-space Eaton panel, plus wire and sub-feed lugs for your Siemens main panel. Speaking of which, that BR240 breaker in your main panel that feeds the pictured sub-panel is an alien - it does not belong in ...


2

Yeah, that will actually work. I mean, the way you wired it would be a horrifying hack if it was mains AC power. That would be a “loop”, and those are very bad (in AC) because everything inside the loop becomes inside the core of a transformer. That’s not a problem in the DC domain. (Mind you I’m not sure that doesn’t change if you use PWM dimming, but I’m ...


2

David! We have 2 DW in our kitchen and I ran a dedicated circuit for each to be safe. Also, that extra capacity might come in handy for an instant hot or garbage disposal. Code is getting stricter and stricter on hard wired appliances...what you can share with plug attached appliances, etc. It gets ambiguous at times. IE: if my DW has a cord, is that a ...


1

I have a couple of ideas: First is the "get by". Second is "prep for the future". The "get by" options: Get 2 15 amp tandem (double stuff) breakers, remove the 4 15 amp breakers next to each other (red box in your pic) and move the circuits to the new tandem breakers. That would free up 2 spots for your range circuit. You ...


0

I'm not yet able to comment, or I would have on other posts. I want, though, to reinforce MonkeyZeus' remarks... Code requirements are MINIMUM. If you design for code, you're designing for "just barely good enough", and leaving no room for variations. Do you want a "just barely good enough" kitchen? The cost of additional mechanical ...


1

I would put a relay between the psu and the led. Then the relay can be triggered by either of the two sensors or even more.


0

Although we can’t see the GFCI it may be the same circuit I would pull the GFCI out and make sure the hot and neutral are for the same circuit. it looks like you must have conduit make sure to remove the insulator that holds the screw on the switch so the body of the switch has a good ground.


0

I would cap the propane line. you may want to go back to it at a later date. Most inspectors use below 8’ as the location that the cable needs protection. But as far as specifically calling out 8’ it doesn’t. 334.15.B & C the NEC specifically allows exposed work & requires protection of the cable coming through the floor for 6”. But as I mentioned ...


1

It may be possible to use the coax cable to pull your CAT 6. Remove the coax wall plate and pull the cable off the back of the plate (or otherwise get the cable freed from the wall). Securely tape sturdy, but thin string or twine to the end of the coax. Pull the coax back through the wall to an access point in the laundry room. Doing so will pull the string ...


2

Ignoring codes, experience, and off-the-cuff responses from big box store employees your question boils down to: Should I make this electrical connection safer? so you asked for some reassurance and received: No, you don't need to make your electrical safer. Yes, make the exposed electrical safer. You'll sleep better at night and you won't be second-...


1

TLDR: connect the c-wire to the chassis or to pin 6 Here is the link to the GMP075-4 Installation Manual The manual has a diagram exactly similar to the picture you posted, which is good because it's the foundation of my explanation: Notice the BL wire (the blue wire) attached to pin 6. This wire has two tell-tale signs of being your C-wire: It is blue It ...


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