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0

Theres a ltl red button sometimes black on the bottom push it in to reset overload..sounds like a badger type disposal


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I have two questions.. Is there a box with neutrals wire nutted together? Second, Is there a fixture on the circuit? Ceiling fan..light... I have actually seen certain smoke detectors cause a loss of power. It seems like you covered most areas as I would have.. The only other things I could recommend would be ohm out the outlet after removing it from circuit....


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This is my idea, but please post a picture of the other switch of that room.


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You probably didn't hurt the garbage disposal, but you probably tripped the circuit breaker in your electrical panel. You may have also fried the switch for the disposal, or any outlets, cords or wires between the disposal and the breaker.


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The issue is loading Generally when you see a 2-pole 240V breaker dedicated to an appliance, the appliance is intentionally sized to use the entire circuit. Take a water heater. Its rating is 23A. Code requires a 125% derate, which puts it at 28.75 amps, just enough to shimmy under the "30 amp" figure. In other words, the appliance uses all of the ...


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With 110vac the cable needs to be protected so no this would not meet current code, if you swapped the romex out for MC type cable it would or ok.


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Color coding time Cables have certain default colors of wires. We're married to that, so usually trying to "color code wires by function" is a big mess. But in this case, it works out to be very close. Let's get there. I want you to mark both traveler wires with yellow tape (or another color, just not black, red or white). No need to distinguish one ...


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Those diagrams on the Internet (especially the annoyingly obsolete ones from that site) assume you only have one source cable. In reality, you often have two source cables, with their blacks going to the same place, their whites going to the same place, and their grounds going to the same place. And if you want to get technical, they aren't actually ...


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Also look into the Conduit wiring method. This allows you to put up to four circuits (or even more with a wire size bump) into a single hole/pipe, instead of only one or two cables. This works because you are fitting individual wires into a pipe, instead of a sheathed cable containing multiple wires, so you don't have the bulk of the sheath, packing and ...


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If you tried to hide the 3rd section of the 3 gang box behind the drywall it would mean that the box is set back a from the wall surface by the thickness of the drywall. That could be 1/2 or even 5/8 inch. That would itself be non compliant with Code because electrical boxes are supposed to be set even with the finished wall surface (although Code does allow ...


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This is worth confirming, but in my experiences, all makers of engineered lumber has install guides to direct where and how big holes can be made in their products. These are available on line at the manufacturers website. If I knew the brand and the material in question I could look it up, but....


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Put a Crown Molding, Decorative Strip or Cornice around the ceiling and run a cable behind that. Conversely, the baseboard(s) can be removed and any wiring can be run behind that, at the bottom of the wall(s).


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Yes, you can do that. So you'll replace the two gang with a three gang box and just have two switches in the box. The new three gang box must be installed correctly, flush with the outer wall surface, with the hole big enough for all three gangs. Remember to shut off all the power when doing any of this work. Take pictures and mark the wires before you ...


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Frame it out and build a small bulkhead then add a access door where it would please you. This way even if someone were to screw into the drywall they would be nowhere near the electrical stuff. You can Frame it out of light gage steel or just stick with 2x4. This way you also avoid the need to repair the ceiling.


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I think your idea of a wood panel isn't bad, but I would go the extra mile here: Buy a nicer board, a couple of basic hinges, and a knob Paint the mounted opening white and fix your drywall Cut your board to be large enough to cover the opening and paint it white Attach the knob and hinges, then mount to the opening on the side closest to the wall It looks ...


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I don't suppose you want to remove the first layer of 1x2's, fix the ceiling as you would normally to and then add a register (yes, another one) vent to cover up the wall portion? Just like the one I showed you yesterday...lol:


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Victorian construcion typically puts a cabinet style door behind tub faucets, so they can be easily changed. But then, tub faucets came to exist in the Victorian age. They would fit a lovely little cabinet door on the vertical, with a latch. The hinge would be on the left, to permit this door to swing open and allow the ceiling hole to be accessed. ...


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The rule for steel plates is 1/16" (1.6mm) The general rule in the NEC for steel plates used to protect wiring from damage is that they need to be 1/16" (1.6mm) or thicker. In other words, you need a piece of sheet steel 15 gauge or thicker in order to provide adequate protection to these cables. This rule is set out in NEC 300.4, specifically 300.4(D) in ...


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Please see my comment on your original question but yes, direct buried cable can be spliced with the correct components. Check with a local electrical supply shop (not a big-box home center) and get their advice on the correct product for your local area and the wire you are splicing. Here is a link to an example of this type of product: Direct Burial ...


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In passing: When things go wrong they go very wrong. Consider the following scenario: Window well pump ingests a bundle of leaves, and clogs. Water rises. Water gets above the lower plug. GFCI trips. Water continues to rise. Now it covers the live screws of the GFCI Depending how clean the water is you may not have enough current to trip the ...


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I called an electrician. They had to snake a wire all the way back to the adjacent room and put a box with a blank on it.


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You can divide this problem into 2 aspects: First, protecting the lumber integrity when running wires. Second, protecting the electrical wires from damage. For load bearing studs (there are less stringent standards for non-load bearing), here are the key (U.S. - you can extrapolate for Canada) requirements for 2x4 studs under 10 feet in length: LUMBER ...


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Looks like a standard install. You can only run so many wires in a hole without de-rating the circuit capacity. The holes are set back at least 3/4" from the stud surface, add 1/2" for drywall and you get 1 1/4" the length of the drywall screws. Even if the drywall screw goes into the same line as the hole it isn't long enough to penetrate the wire. If ...


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Get a different sensor (or replace the wiring in the wall) You have an old-style switch loop, where the black wire is the hot, the white wire is the switched hot, and the bare wire is ground, of course. Notice what's missing from this description? Neutral, that's what! This is because a mechanical light switch has no use for a neutral wire; however, your ...


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The wiring in your wall is called a "traditional switch loop". The two wires present (besides ground) are always-hot (we hope, the white) and switched-hot (we hope, the black). Note that neutral is NOT present in this box. This is a case of white being used as a hot wire because the cable only has 2 conductors. Modern Code requires a re-tasked white wire ...


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Neutral Required Many (not all) smart switches, timers, motion sensors, etc. require a neutral. That is because they need to get power even when the switched device is off. Some older switches were designed to leak power through the device even when "off", but that does not work well with LED lights, so needing a neutral at the switch has become more common ...


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This is very tricky, because you have both a GFCI device and a switch in close proximity. It's easy to miswire it so you get an instant GFCI trip when you turn on the light. But even before that, there's a fair chance the receptacle is already GFCI protected, and you should check for that. If you have one of the common 3-light testers (you want the ...


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I believe Mirinth's answer is correct, the thick green/yellow stripe wire is a ground strap and the smaller green wire is an electronics ground. Here's why: I have a Samsung unit, model DVE52M7750W, with a similar panel. All the wiring in this unit's panel matches yours except the ground strap is a white wire, instead of green/yellow stripe and there is an ...


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I assume you have forced air heating & cooling. If not this is very simple with baseboard 220v heat. Add a heater or more on a different 220v circuit, connected to a thermostat. Forced Air, isn't hard, but probably expensive. You will have to isolate the runs to that particular area. Add a flow switching device, that also activates the end device, ...


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Sure, you can always upsize the wire. However, a dramatic upsize introduces two complications. the much-larger wire will not fit on the device. It will need to be pigtailed to a suitably sized wire, such as a 6 AWG. When dealing with #1 wire, it's not as simple as using a giant orange wire-nut the size of a salt shaker. You have to use a connector ...


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Yes, having larger wire is always fine. Depending what size wire the terminals on the 40 amp breaker are listed for you might need a pigtail of wire that fits that breaker connected to your 1 AWG, but that's a common problem with a straightforward solution. You should consider using aluminum wire for a run this big, if you are presently looking at copper.


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You can run larger cable and use a smaller breaker but not the other way around. If your planning on 1 AWG for 100 Amps then you're talking about aluminum cable. You'll have to pigtail at both ends to a 8 AWG because the 1 AWG won't fit in the 40 Amp breaker or receptacle. That future 100 Amp load could be a strain on your panel so check into that along with ...


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These are al 12v lights, and 12v is pretty safe to work with. There should be nothing wrong with splicing all the positive wires and negative wires to one cable that then hooks up to the battery. Because they are LED lights running on DC current, polarity matters, and it might not be obvious on the wires which is positive and which is negative so pay ...


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It sounds like you're on the right track. There are several green wires in the pictures, so I took the second picture and labeled them. Small green wire (#1) This one is bolted to the dryer's case in the first picture, but loose in the second one. It's meant to connect internal equipment (probably the timer/computer) to the case so it has a ground. It ...


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Make up your mind :) One of the tropes around here is people wanting a light to be controlled by a complex switch scheme, and also controlled by another complex switch scheme. Somehow, these are supposed to play nice together. They don't. And it degrades into a glitchy mess pretty fast. The best answer in this case is a networked smart-switch scheme ...


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I'm only familiar with low voltage outdoor lighting and for it look into getting a transformer rated for outdoor flood lights with a photo lens to detect day/night if you want hands off. They have screws which you connect the outdoor wires too. Be sure you check the watts you need by adding up all the light watts that it runs. It just needs a standard ...


1

It's a Lutron dimmer with night light. First, that should never have been used to control an outlet. You must not put dimmers on outlets, because if someone plugs in a non-lamp, the power-shaping issues can cause equipment to dramatically overheat and start a fire. If you have any more dimmers controlling receptacles, remove them now and fit standard ...


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It has more to do with the dimmer that the other room lights. Solid State dimmers all have "leakage current" through them; there is no true "Off" unless the dimmer has an added contact in series that opens (provides an air gap). You can tell if yours has that because there is a further "click" you can feel if you push a little harder to the Off position. ...


0

Connect the sensor's control wires to the two travellers.


6

Neutral is not ground. You must always keep them separate. (even in the main panel; however there, you will have a neutral-ground equipotential bond, the only one in the house). So a 4-wire connection does exactly what you'd think: neutral to neutral and ground to ground. However, before grounding, it was universal to run a 3-wire connection to ...


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No, No, No! In this day and age you never hook green (ground) wires to white (neutral) wires. That's why you're going to a 4 prong from a 3 prong... so you can separate them. You need to determine where those green wires are hooked up that appear to go behind the terminal block to make sure they are not jumped to the neutral, white wire. If they are, ...


0

Hmm, 3-way circuits do not have line and load. A 3-way circuit is simplicity itself if you pause to a) learn how they work and b) identify your wires before you do anything. Of course, people never do that. They see a bunch of different wire colors, and positions of screws on the switch - and expect that to contain the information they need. In fact, ...


1

Is this junction box actually rated for ceiling fans? You can't put a fan on a regular plain ole junction box, because it is simply not made for the rather high dynamic forces of the fan moving. The box will tear out of the ceiling, or metal fatigue will make the box itself fail. As far as the wires in there, I'd expect to see a group of blacks (with ...


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The two twisted copper bare wires are the ground. You can take the green wire, strip some more insulation off it, and connect it to them with a wire nut. Enjoy your new fan. Yes, the fan becomes grounded by attaching it to the mounting bracket.


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The alternative to repairing the wire is to use a wireless door-bell. That might get expensive in batteries if you have a video door bell - but it's certainly worth considering.


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It is not common because of cost but it’s also not uncommon. I agree with Harper if I have a broken bell wire I would use something on the truck to repair the wires. Since it was repaired you may get lucky and be able to use the existing wires as a pull. I would use a pull string , but you may have some stout fishing line that could work. The trick here is ...


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No, it is not common. But if it works, it certainly isn't unsafe if done right. You're real interest is how to get your new video bell working. You said the circuit has a short, but suspect you mean it is open. You should measure 24 volts AC across the two wires at the door. Make sure your volt-meter is set in the AC position. Using the DC position will ...


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I think you've already figured out that older units often didn't run the C wire. Power from 'R' was switched to 'G' (fan) and/or 'W' (heat) by a simple switch in the thermostat. The older thermostats needed no power, so there wan't any point in running the common wire 'C'. Older "smart" thermostats worked off the difference between 'R' and 'W' when the ...


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Red is usually used for "switched hot". Black is typically for the hot side, and white is for neutral. I would expect you to wire black to black, white to white, and bare/green to bare/green. Then you'd control the ceiling fan with the remote, NOT the switch.


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there is a tap rule in the NEC that allows the you to run 12awg and tap off it using 14awg. for example from breaker to outlet #1 12awg, from outlet #1 to outlet #2 12awg, but while in outlet #1 you may tie the wire from the breaker and the wire to outlet #2 to a 14awg that would go to the recep.


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