New answers tagged

0

What complicates things is that there is a Code requirement (called out in NEC, repeated in building codes) that a switch in an obvious location must turn on a light in the room. They notch out an exception for switched receptacles; these also count. If the fan's light is the only light in the room, it must switch with the switch. Light and fan are ...


0

It looks like you’ve misinterpreted the use of some of the wires, but this is the way I interpret it. For the switch box, you have a 14/2 coming in with power and a 14/2 that leaves with constant power to go on to the next outlet or light in the circuit. One switch provides switched power to the black wire on the 14/3, and the other switch gives switched ...


7

LEDs Don't Like to be Dimmed. Period. A dimmer is not, contrary to popular belief (including what I thought when I was a kid) simply reducing the constant amount of current or voltage. Rather, it chops up the power into little pieces and only sends some of those pieces to the lights. With incandescent lights, only the total power really matters much. It ...


1

C is definately number 2, check for markings on the device. My bet is on it being the one with the red wire (because the diagram shows 2 wires to "C") for live and neutral measure the resistance from the plug. Also look at where the wires go compared to the diagram. But, if forced to guess brown is live and blue is neutral, it's an international colour ...


6

The specifications of the LED lights you have say they will dim down to 10% without any flicker or buzzing. Some lights don't go down that far, and some will go even further. Based on the manual for your dimmer switch, there is an adjustment to change the low end of the dimming range: I would assume the switch would be factory set to work with most lights,...


-1

The original Honeywell switch was a 2-pole switch. And typically with Honeywells, one pole is thermostatically controlled, and connects both blacks if it's too cold. The other side is a simple on/off switch that is regardless of temperature; both reds are connected unless the switch is in the OFF position. And the thermostat doesn't care whether it's ...


1

NO, NO, AND NO!!! RED DOES NOT CONNECT TO WHITE. The "hot black" from your new switch goes to the black wire in the box that is feeding the circuit. The "load red" from your new switch then goes to the remaining black wire in the box. Yes, the green wire goes to ground.


0

Not sure what you mean by "The 3 way switches have a "neutral wire in, a hot wire in and 2 traveler wires coming out of them". Then you said, "all the whites are connected". So that needs clarification. There are several ways of connecting 3 way switches. my preferred way is power in to the "first" switch, 14/3 to the "second" switch, then from there to ...


0

White in the original switch may have been part of a switch leg not a neutral that your new switch needs, on the new switch I believe you need a neutral if there are several whites in the box tied together that is usually the neutral but a single white may actually be a hot, the hot normally a black in the box but could be a white if s switch leg goes to ...


2

Well, you're halfway there, and kudos on you for not blindly experimenting as many will tend to. (this can lead to configurations which "work" but will kill you). I can tell you what is definitely correct: Green to your ground wires. White to your actual neutral wires, and your all-white bundle appears to be both neutral and also neutral for these ...


2

Not possible. Trendy pushbutton timers require neutral, and you don't have it. Wait. You're old-school, and you want to use an Intermatic wind-up timer where the energy comes from YOU? Oh yes, that'll work just fine! No . . . Yes In fact, that's exactly what I did with a water heater. Now, the timer might be rated for the amperage. But I didn't ...


0

I have a 120V / 20A baseboard stat that goes that low and would like to use it to over ride the T5 even if it is turned off. My concern is that if it is turned off or on and the second one over rides it will the voltage spike damage the T5? Any ideas on protecting the T5? You don't say whether the T5 is controlling the electric baseboard heat or some other ...


0

There are devices designed to allow this to work, and to not endanger you while you install it. (This one is just the first I found, there are probably cheaper ones.) In the early days of powerline communications, they just suggested installing a small capacitor joining the two sides of the circuit. It must be able to take 240V, and to be small enough to ...


0

You do want the two breakers for a multiwire branch circuit to be right next to each other so the handles can be tied together, but in terms of overload protection and the effect on the neutral, it should not be a problem. The slots on a breaker panel go +-+-, so a two pole breaker will draw from +- and the maximum load on the neutral will never be double ...


4

American residential power is usually two split-phase legs off a power pole mounted transformer with a center-tapped secondary winding. The center tap is connected to the house neutral. You'll get the best connection if your two powerline adapters are on the same circuit, but you have a good chance of them working even if they are not on the same circuit as ...


1

Yes, you can, and the general idea is: If the power feed comes first to the switchbox you want to keep: Convert your 3 + ground to 2 + ground by capping off the red wire with wire nuts at both ends. (see Correct way to remove a red wire from a circuit) Replace switch with outlet, wire up. Replace remaining 3-way switch with a 2 way, and pigtail some new ...


14

I did the unthinkable, and started to read the manual for the product you linked, and in the troubleshooting section there is a theme: Try another wall socket and make sure all powerline devices are on the same electrical circuit. If you search the PDF for "circuit" you find this phrase several times. I didn't find where the manual lists using the same ...


7

Cross-phase communication for power line carrier products can be a challenging problem. (see a white paper from Intellon, a manufacturer of PLC devices, there.) You may be able to improve the coupling between phases, at least for a short time, by turning on an electric-powered heating appliance such as a range, oven, clothes dryer, or water heater. If ...


6

A large enough junction box First, you are going to need a very large junction box to do all this splicing. Let's count conductors. Two /2 cables and one /3 cable = 7 conductors to splice. Plus the 7 conductors they'll meet in this box. Plus 1 conductor count to cover all ground wires Plus 1 conductor count to cover all cable clamps Plus 2 conductor ...


2

Your plan sounds good, except for one thing you do have to check. Anytime you remove an outlet, make sure you are not falling below the minimum outlets required. In particular, a 6-foot cord from an appliance anywhere along the wall needs to be able to reach a power outlet. It appears your old outlet is near a threshold, so if it's moving farther from ...


0

Looking closely at the pictures of the sides of your outlet, I'd say NO. It looks like the tabs have been broken off so that each plug of the outlet has a separate supply of power. Is one outlet switched while the other is always on? I'd suggest running two new cables down from the new location to the old and tying one new black/white to one set of black/...


1

Your plan is correct. Unless you have a switched outlet or some other oddity, it's just black-to-black, white-to-white, and ground-to-ground across the board. FYI, "Romex™" is a brand name that's like "Kleenex™". It's not an industry term for "building wire" and doesn't translate well to other countries. Also, the company makes many products. ...


1

The weak link in the grounding may be the cover. Your fully-raised cover only contacts the (grounded) box at the edges and through the screws. A proper ground requires a cover with flattened corners, to make solid contact with the corners of the junction box. The flat contact between the receptacle's strap and the cover completes the ground path.


1

At the main service the grounding(bare wire) and grounded conductor (white wire/neutral) are together. ANY panel (aka sub panel) after the main panel is a sub panel and the grounded conductor (white wire/aka neutral) are not bonded and should be separated. Period! You have a floating ground condition and someone could get hurt and also the GFCI may never ...


3

Your "intake vent" is better referred to as a "return air vent in the stud wall cavity". The reason there appears to be a 90 degree turn in it is because there is! Behind the drywall, at the base of the wall, there is a hole where the floor would be, this transitions into a metal duct which travels back to your HVAC unit, just like you see if you open up ...


0

I've come across a few boxes that were like this, have accidentally contacted live wires to them (with enough oomph behind the arc to weld it to the box) and I will say wire everything securely and insulate or trim down any exposed wire if you do any work in them. In my experience, the discharge to the box didn't trip the breaker and it was blind luck that ...


2

Retrofitting low voltage wire through a finished structure can be a challenging brain-teaser. When you mention fishing through an "intake vent" are you referring to the ducting of a central HVAC system? If so you'll need to use plenum-rated cable, and be aware that depending on air flow through the duct, you might get noise (whistling, vibrating, etc). Here'...


1

First problem is that you have multiple grounds, because your main panel is grounded and now you've bonded grounds in your subpanel. This is illegal and not safe. As for your GFI's as long as your box the device is in has continuity to ground, which is done through the bonding screw in the subpanel you should be fine. Someone mentioned grounding the panel ...


0

I really have to disagree for the following reason. First the tap rule is found in Article 240 Which is for overcurrent protection. More specifically 240.21(B) "Feeder Conductors" (2) "Taps not over 25 ft long" which says you can only use the tap rule if it meets all 3 requirements. Part 2 of that requirement states: The tap conductors terminate in a ...


3

The sales info I looked at showed it with a 3 wire plug so it should be ok. Some electronic controlled devices require a neutral and then a 4 wire would be needed but it looks to be straight 240 so your plan should work. As far as GFCI code specifies 15 & 20 amp circuits so it would not be required but gfci’s around liquid are a good idea.


2

No the requirement is 6” from the back of the box , no tape measure a dollar bill will , if you only have a 20 I will trade you for a dollar and you will be good,,, ok that has only almost worked once LOL. My first job as a licensed electrician my dad said I will save you thousands and went back and clipped all my wires on the rough in , the inspector knew ...


4

The answer is yes. The tap rules do allow this and it is common in older homes to tap a duplex off the supply, conduit from the tap to the outlet box is usually required and metal flex MC /AC is normally used. The 10 foot tap rule has always been used on every example of this that I have seen. On both electric stove tops on top of the counter and single ...


5

Assuming we are talking about the US/Canada, I'll make some basic assumptions: Not the stove just the oven would almost always mean electric oven. That is because gas is great for a cooktop but not as useful for an oven. So typically a combination cooktop/oven will use gas but not when they are separate. Electric oven typically means 30A or 40A dedicated ...


0

If you don't need a semi-rigid cable, Teslong makes an inexpensive USB borescope with a 50' cable ($28). I've used this with my laptop to examine my HVAC system, and it is apparently compatible with most smartphones (although I haven't had any luck finding a USB adapter that fits my Google Pixel).


36

The conduit is the grounding path Note that the wiring in your case is run not using sheathed cables, but as individual wires inside a metallic conduit (aka the pipe-like stuff you see heading off to the left in your picture). As a result, the conduit is a serviceable grounding path in its own right, connecting the receptacle grounds and boxes to the ...


1

Since it's all conduit, you should be able to stuff a ground wire down it, by hook or by crook Since we're feeding a 100A panel via conduit, getting a ground in there isn't as hard as it sounds. You only need about 75-80' of 8AWG bare stranded copper for this, and should be able to pull it through by turning off the feeder in the main panel, unhooking it ...


0

Diode in reverse parallel with Led (or Led with limiting resistor). Should give you a halfwave rectified 60hz sine & the Led will still light up, but some people might notice said flicker. You might compensate the flicker by evening out sinewave with simple RC. Might be all simpler than a bridge rectifier circuit.


2

SMH how is that simpler?? You get a new heater of the same basic form-factor, bolt it up in the old location, and connect the wires to it like it was to the old one. Clearly the skill to attach wires is not absent, since you plan to wire it to a receptacle. Do you possibly have a mental block about "gosh, I don't know where to get one of those" or "...


7

Panel issues First, manasshkatz correctly spotted the alien breaker second from bottom on the right side. The lower left breaker is a Siemens QP. Those alien breakers have gotta go. You need "Westinghouse" (read: Cutler Hammer/Eaton) BR/C family, commonly known as BR. The 30A Siemens is a mystery. There's almost no legitimate use for a 30A 1-pole breaker....


8

A GFCI breaker does not know or care what happens upstream (elsewhere in the subpanel or back at the main panel. All that matters is that neutral and hot are connected to it properly so that it can detect the difference between them. If there is a ground wire going to the protected device then that ground must be separate from neutral until sometime past the ...


6

Having the ground wires pulled outside the electrical box like that is one of the biggest kludge jobs I have seen in a long time. This certainly is not the way it is supposed to be done. You did the correct thing pulling the grounds inside the box. In the box you connect them together and then pigtail that connection the that screw in the back of the box.


0

A lot more information about the wattage of the new heater, breaker size, etc. would be needed to thoroughly answer this. In a nutshell though,if the instructions for the new heater state that it can be installed with a cord and plug then you could and would then need to add the appropriate electrical box and outlet to the wires from the switch. If the ...


1

As you seem to know, the "bare" wires, along with any green or yellow/green wires, are always and only Equipment Safety Ground. They get used for nothing else. How the 3 wires must be allocated NEC 110.3(B) requires you install the light switches according to the instructions. This is not optional. Since Reading the Fine Manual is mandatory, you see the "...


2

Flip one side from L1 to L2 Your switches are intended for both single-pole and multi-way (multi-location) applications; as a result, both the "up" and the "down" positions on the switch connect COM to another terminal (either L1 or L2, depending on which position we're talking about), instead of having only one position that connects the terminals together,...


0

To add to the other answers... Why 20A receptacles can only be on a 20A breaker Receptacle sizes seem pretty arbitrary, don't they? Here's the Code proper: There are two exceptions in Code. You've already met the "50A socket on 40A circuit" exception; that exists because 40A receptacles don't exist. The other exception is so you can use common ...


1

You can do it but there are a couple of things you need to do. First change that breaker to a 20 amp, depend on brand you may be able to just stick the wires in the breaker terminals and torque them down if not a 12 awg pigtail will be needed again installed to the proper torque. Now at the receptacle or outlet it depends on the box size or wire fill as you ...


-1

NEC 210.21(B)(3) Receptacle Ratings. Where connected to a branch circuit supplying two or more receptacles or outlets, receptacle ratings shall conform to the values listed in Table 210.21(B)(3), or where rated higher than 50 amperes, the receptacle rating shall not less than the branch circuit rating. (Then there are exceptions for welders and lighting.) ...


1

Yes, the Code prevents you from doing this. On the surface you'd think you can pigtail the #8 wire to #12 (because #8 won't fit in 20 Amp outlets) and connect the #12 to 20 Amp outlets. But the 40 Amp breaker has to be changed out to a 20 AMP breaker because the breaker can't exceed the rating of the wire/outlets attached to it so you'd be limited to using ...


2

Here's the answer. It turns out there must be another junction box. I made an incorrect assumption that Light/Junction #1 is the main junction. It isn't. It appears to be wired like this: Breaker feeds some junction that I can't see which then feeds Outlet A and Light/Junction #1. So anytime the breaker is on, Outlet A is powered no matter what. Really ...


1

Mounting a splicing wire connector turns it into a pumpkinterminal block We know that by definition, as per ZMVV.GuideInfo: Splicing wire connectors establish a connection between two or more conductors by means of mechanical pressure and are not intended to be permanently mounted. They are floating, such as a twist-on connector in an outlet box. , a ...


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