New answers tagged

1

It is unusual for single conductor with cloth braid to be used except for feeder wiring like that. Cloth braid was common up to the 50’s but normally there were 2 wires in the cable when run loose. knob and tube also ran single insulated wires down walls but normally maintained separation of the conductors and was not allowed to wander like or to use the ...


0

So, that braided outer is pretty common in shorter lengths to keep discrete conductors (hot or neutral) separate when the wires jump off their anchoring knobs. It's most common (in my experience) as a shield coming into a junction box. If you wanted to do anything about it, you could replace the two strands with a romex-type of modern wire. You'd have ...


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In case of mechanical stress to the house/walls, f.e. in earth quake locations or at hills, geologically active zones etc. it would be safer to provide an extra Ground wire. Another aspect are counterflow heat exchangers which will help to save energy/money. Easy for DIY, not expensive, e.g. How To Make A Heat Exchanger


3

You're pretty close to color-coded here, so I'd get some colored tape and mark stuff up. The cluster of 4 hots on the wire-nut is all always-hot. It comes from supply, goes onward to some other outlet, and then there are two pigtails going to the 2 switches. I like black for always-hot, but it's not mandatory. I would change that red pigtail out for ...


1

1) the upper terminal of the light switch has two wires leading to it (from what I've read it might be the Jumper taking power to the fan switch?) Correct. Switches connect always-hot to switched-hot (or not). Most of the time when there's more than one switch in a box, the always-hot must be split to reach multiple switches. The installer usually does ...


2

You're going to run a new 14/2 (plus ground) cable* down from the light and connect it to the same points as your current light's cable: The white wire goes to the bundle of whites The black wire goes to the screw on the switch that has the black wire now The bare ground connects to the ground bundle It looks like that switch can accept multiple wires ...


0

The one place that I lived at where it had a heat pump did have a auto-stop on the compressor so that it would not run below freezing temps. If the temp dropped while the compressor was running, you would hear a hissing sound when it would shut itself off. I grew up with gas heat so there was always hot air blowing regardless of the outdoor temp. I ...


1

I looked at the instruction manual for the switch, and it says: Switching action is as follows: Upon a drop in boiler water temperature (to dial setting, less differential), makes R to B burner contact; breaks R to W contact, preventing circulator operation. Upon a rise in boiler water temperature (to dial setting), breaks R to B burner contact, ...


2

I can’t tell but I think I see a bare copper middle right or possibly a green screw , this is the proper grounding point. It looks to me that each switch has a black wire that goes to the same wire nut this would usually be the hot because if the hot was on the top of the left switch when you turn that off the other switch would not work. My guess is the ...


1

My actual solution I fixed this a while ago but never came back to update the post. I ended up getting a Wemo smart light switch (since I already have other Wemo devices) and wired that to the load side of my GFCI to control my outside outlet. Looks nice and works great!


0

Standard single switch will work. Most modern switches have three screws (two hot wires with ground) or four (three hot wires with ground). The one with four screws is the one that you DO NOT want to replace it with. Find a switch with three connectors on it. Based on your photo, they share the incoming electricity but are connected to separate lights. ...


1

Put the cutoff outside, at the meter socket I can understand wanting a cutoff ahead of your panel; this is a very nice thing to have, as it makes servicing the actual panel a snap compared to the more conventional configuration where the service disconnect is in the main panel with always-hot service entrance conductors coming in from a separate meter base. ...


3

From your other posts and from looking at the type of cable, you appear to be in the UK. Most domestic fixed wiring in the UK is done with what we call "twin and earth" (T&E) cable. This has two insulated current carrying conductors and an uninsulated earth conductor arranged side by side in a flat profile and covered by an outer sheath. The earth ...


0

I can’t see the gauge or type of wire in the wire coming in or to the breaker. If the splice is a compression listed for copper / aluminum this may be what they did to extend the wiring with the feeder being aluminum (possibly). I do not like panels being put in with the main at the bottom , there was no reason for it in this case. If the wire is sized ...


2

You have 2 each single pole switches the black wire that connects to both switches is the hot wire (turn the breaker off before replacing) any standard single pole switch will work, you can get simple toggles like you have or the fancier decora but a new cover plate will be needed with the decora (a double gang 2 device cover plate) Each switch has 2 ...


9

Nope. Nope nope nope. You cannot use 210.12(A)(4) to put AFCI at an outlet. There are certain fairly rare cases where you can put AFCI at the first outlet. However, there is a misconception that has turned into a regular "old wives' tale", that one can skip the expensive AFCI breaker and just slap an ACFI recep at the first outlet. Oh no you can't! ...


1

By code the junction box must be accessible, if you read the definition of accessible as applied to wiring methods “capable of being removed or exposed without damaging the building structure or finish or not permanently closed in by the structure or finish of the building”. So wiring methods located behind removable panels designed to allow access are not ...


1

If the wires are installed in a junction box, then wire nut them separately, wrap some electrical tape around them, insert them back into the junction box and cover the box with an approved cover plate. If they are just dangling out of a hole in the drywall/tile, then you need to find out what junction box they come from, probably a switch box, and ...


1

Take the two black wires in the box and wire nut them together. Take the two white wires from the box and twist them together and then connect them to the two white wires from the fixture with a wire nut. Take the red wire in the box and connect it to the two black wires from the fixture with a wire nut. Connect the ground wires together. Turn off the power ...


2

Can't do it. There must be at least 1/4" of sheath past the cable clamp. No cable clamp. Also there are painful limits on number of jacketed Romex cables in conduit. You can't just cram 'em in. Only if you put a junction box at the top of the conduit Fit a junction box there, then use a less-than-2-foot run of conduit called a "nipple". Consolidate ...


3

as I understand it BS7671 requires that the cable is buried deep enough to prevent the cable being disturbed by any reasonably foreseeable disturbance of the land but does not specify a particular depth. There should also be a warning tape burried above the cable. Normally though the recommendation for a domestic garden is around half a meter. That is ...


1

Yes, this is a classic switch loop. Nothing unusual about it (except it's new to you of course, and a darned impediment). Power (hot and neutral) from source into the lamp. The switch loop wires do exactly what you found, and there (was) no reason for neutral to make the trek down to the switch. As of 2011, switch loops are required to bring neutral, ...


5

You can't use #8 on a 50A circuit You have to read out of the 60C column of 310.15(B)(16), which means you are limited to 40A. It would be possible with other classes of wire in conduit, but not possible with the usual types of cable used in America used for this job (which is what you are referring to). If you really need 50A, then change to #6 cable....


3

In the first picture, what is the white board(labelled A) called? That's called a 66 block. They're used to patch phone lines together. How do I trace cables? Tone generator. You can find these online. You get a generator you hook to one end, and then a "wand" for the other. When hooked up, it makes a EMF "warble" that the wand can find just by being ...


0

If your new switch is the same as the old you have skinned a wire or have hot touching ground. You should be able to connect all of the black wires together and the light would be on all the time and not trip the breaker . The switch is a simple open closed device. 1 hot feeding another device and the switch to the light when the switch is in the on ...


0

I agree with everything George Pearson said, except for toning you can just hook a switch up where all the wires are joined in the basement connect all the cat5e wires to rj45 ends and plug into the switch, and connect a computer or other hard wired device to each port that you know exists 1 by 1 and the switch will light up telling you which Port on switch ...


0

Like most home wiring environments cable run identity is non existent. Harbor Freight sells an inexpensive cable toning kit to quickly ID your cables; it is for phone cables but works for Ethernet as well. Once ID'd you can label both ends with numbers or names on masking tape. CAT 5E cable is capable of handling 1gb Ethernet if terminated correctly. ...


1

I've seen enough. What went wrong I'm guessing that somebody swapped out these switches in recent years, since they are too modern-looking for 1971. What they did was move the wires to the new switch, based on physical position on the old switch. Of course, switch manufacturers randomize the location of screws on every switch (no two are alike), so ...


0

Those switches are connected wrong. On the left are two separate screw terminals (plus the ground screw). Consider those as the "output" of the switches. On the right are two joined screw terminals. Those are the "input" to the switches. Your switches are wired backwards. Simply switch the wires on either side: move the single wire on the left to either ...


0

As already mentioned, you need to put Ethernet connectors on the ends of the cables coming into the utility box. You'll need a CAT 5 crimper tool with some ethernet plugs to do this. It's kind of a pain to do this as a novice, but you'll get better with experience. Then you will need a switch. It doesn't look like you have many cables, so a 5-port switch ...


2

Yes you can just hook up the fan to +12V (yellow) and Ground (black) and ignore the control lines of the fan. They are for fan speed control to reduce noise in a computer. If they are not connected, fan runs always at full speed.


0

The additional wires are probably speed reporting and/or variable speed control. They can likely be ignored. More on that You'll want to be sure that your fan isn't a 5v unit, though.


1

Definitely separate out that neutral and ground wire. Don't bother replacing the aluminum wires Yeah I know there's some ooga-booga out there about aluminum, but that has nothing to do with your heavy feeder, which is fine stuff and you should keep it. The problem related to very small wires in 15/20A branch circuits, specifically use of outlets and ...


0

I would second most of the existing answers. However, from an ease of use standpoint, getting a pair of MOCA adapters, and plugging one into the coax at the bottom and one at the coax in the room would allow you to distribute internet to one room with very little effort or cost.


19

Answering your questions in order to the best of my ability: Your cabling is currently connected to a telephone style punch-down block. For standard computer networking, I would purchase a RJ45 patch panel instead, and connect each cable to its own patch panel jack. I will defer to other commenters on how to best avoid interfering with telephone service ...


3

That sounds like your standard basic electrical bodge job, where it once worked, and then some homeowner or handyman got in there and mucked it up good-n-plenty. God knows what else could be wrong in there. Or what else that menace has done! I gather all this sparky stuff is new to you. You may be better off bringing in a pro to correct that blunder and ...


38

Ho Le Crap! most of the pics you are showing involved phone service, not in house Ethernet / LAN. Your 6 pin connectors are for RJ16 jacks/plugs (3 line phone service). RJ45 requires 8 conductors and an 8 pin jack/plug. cat5e or cat6 can be terminated on a patch panel, but not a punch down block ("A" in your pics). It can be pretty simple: Connect all ...


6

Even though the cable is good enough for Ethernet transport, you need to change the topology. Basically, your PC, routers, etc... all expect to be connected point to point. PC at one end, router at the other end, for example. Right now, you have all the endpoints connected together. Buy a network switch or hub, install it where all the wires connect. For ...


1

I would just live with the place for a while and get accustomed to it--you might find that the master switch is convenient. Otherwise, you could install a temporary lock. There are many kinds to be had.


4

You can use metal staples, which give you a bit more size flexibility. Just be sure to go forth gently and not crimp the cable jacket at all. There are staples with plastic caps for that size cable, though. Secure ... 8/3 - 6/3 non-metallic sheathed cable... to wood framing


0

It looks like the receptacle is a 10-30R, which as I understand is frowned upon today because it doesn't provide a ground prong. Indeed, the socket is nominally two hots and a Neutral. IIRC it used to be allowed to use the neutral as a ground in certain circumstances, but it was never allowed to use a ground as a neutral. So the nema 10 socket has to go. ...


3

With only 5v on the bottom breaker I would turn them off and then pull the breaker and look at the buss terminals. Are they bright and shiny, or possibly melted away? Inspect the breakers also; if no damage is found with the breaker out of the panel, close it and measure the resistance from where the wires connect to the back of the breaker. This should be ...


0

I would think that would be OK. But to bring your sub-panel up to code you'll need 2 ground rods for your detached building as well.


10

The problematic receptacle Use of a NEMA 10 family receptacle is illegal today. It was always illegal with that cable type, which is a "/2 + ground" type, for reasons I go into in comments on George Anderson's answer. Use of SE cable was legal, but only to help dealers use up their remaining stocks. So the NEMA 10 must go; you don't have the right cable ...


6

Option 1, fit one GFCI recep, put sticker on the other. Option 2, fit two GFCI receps, and use only the LINE terminals. GFCI rules This NEC set of rules says that all bathroom outlets must be GFCI. Not at all. Plain outlets are fine if they're downline from a GFCI device. However... However, in terms of salability, I would like any potential buyers ...


2

You had a pretty accurate knowledge of what was wrong with the outlet and George summed it up nicely. One thought to make it safe, and usable, would be to remove the outlet and add a regular metal box, cover and 20 Amp GFCI outlet. At the panel, add a 20 Amp breaker right below the existing 60 as a slot's already available. Remove the black wire from the 60 ...


8

Maybe used for a welder? Kiln? The worst thing right now is the breaker "protecting" the circuit. It's double what it should be. 10ga wire in cable is rated at 30 amps! Not 60!!! The wiring on your outlet is OK, just dated. It's fine for a 240v only appliance: 2 hots and a ground. Not code legal anymore, but commonly done for clothes dryers in the ...


0

Your kitchen has a three-phase supply. Your hob can run on a single-phase to neutral (1N AC 32 A) or on two phases of a three-phase supply (2N AC 16 A). Note that the current is split into two 16 A circuits for the three-phase supply. This is the one you want. Figure 1. Probable internal wiring. R1 and R2 each represent one or more hobs.


10

Just connect the cable from the second outlet to the "line" side of the first GFCI (or wire-nut and pigtail the first GFCI. Then install the 2nd GFCI normally. Alternatively, most GFCI outlets come with little stickers to put on the cover plates of downstream protected outlets. If you choose that route, you would wire the cable to the 2nd outlet to the "...


3

There's a difference between "daisy-chaining" (sequential GFCI) and having multiple on different branches of the same circuit. I haven't heard of the latter being troublesome. You won't get around potential nuisance trips with the former. If that's not your scenario, Just put one in and use the stickers to label the downstream outlets. That's standard ...


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