New answers tagged

0

On Square D panels, back then and into now (there have been few changes to anything), you have always been able to put 2 x #14 or #12 on each hole in the ground / neutral bars, regardless of if it is G or N. But as previously stated, you must follow the mfr instructions. There should be (would have been) a paper label on the inside of the door that would ...


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This pivots on NEC 110.3(b): You must use equipment according to its labeling and instructions. If the labeling/instructions say you can do it, then you can do it. For instance my Pushmatic panels have wire capture slots on both sides of each screw on the N-G bar, so it's no trouble at all. My CH panels do not have this. If your bars are full, the best ...


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I just put up drywall and discovered the supply I was counted on is actually a switch loop. How do I make this work with the wires in the wall? The crux of the answer is getting always-hot and neutral to the switch box, so you can complete your circuit as originally intended. Since I assume you don't want to bust up any drywall, I'll discuss options in ...


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The issue isn’t about mixing ground and neutral on a single bus in the main panel. That is allowed although it’s preferred to have separate neutral and ground busses, both bonded to the chassis and grounded. The issue is that most panel busses aren’t rated to have more than one wire per termination point. Some are but most aren’t. The issue, other than just ...


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There are basically two ways to wire up a switched device (light, fan, receptacle, whatever). Switch Loop A switch loop essentially looks like: Panel => Device => Switch That matches your description of the existing fan/switch. Power is at the fan in the ceiling. The hot wire (should be black, at least the part from the panel to the fan) goes past ...


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Indeed they are crossed. It doesn't matter because the linking tabs are intact So, electrically it makes no difference, both left screws do the same thing, both right screws do the same other thing. and so top and bottom are interchangeable. When you replace the outlets you should probably wire one romex to the top outlets and the other to the bottom, if ...


5

Check the tabs. Check the tabs. That is the #1 trouble spot. If a tab is broken off on the old receptacle, do the same with the new. When there are 2 wires on a side, what that means is totally different if the tabs are broken off, versus not. White wires on silver screws, black on brass screws The old one should be like that. If you see a case ...


3

The first thing to check is to see if the metal tabs on the sides are broken off or still intact (I cannot tell from your photo). If one or both are broken off, then the two receptacles are powered separately (maybe one is switched). In this case, you must wire the new unit the same way and break off the same tab(s). If the tabs are intact, then both wires ...


3

First question is - are any of the outlets switched? Also, if any are switched, and technically even if they aren't, its important to be sure that each outlet is controlled by only one circuit breaker. For the most part you should find the answer to be yes, but its still a really great idea to confirm it, especially since you aren't the person who wired it ...


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I am really not sure you have asked a question. Your heading mentions a diagram but you have no diagram just pictures. So when you send in better pictures per @ThreePhaseEel request you might see if you could post up some sort of diagram. If you real question is, Why isn't my cooling coming on? Then one of the reasons is that you haven't connected you're ...


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You need a disconnect by law, unless the troffer is cord-and-plug connected. You can twist the wires out of the old disconnect, but then you'll need to go buy another one -- and they sell them in packs of 5 at most home improvement stores for about $5. What matters is the wires on the ballast side I gather the disconnects have some pigtails of wire ...


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There's nothing wrong with adding another wire to the COM terminal at your furnace. Just use the spare blue wire there along with the existing white wire from the other cable.


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Make sure your breakers are on opposite phase. Do that by putting a volt meter between the two breakers. If you read 220v you are good. If it reads 0 you are on the same phase and the neutral can carry twice the intended current. I have a house wired with the ge q-line half width breakers. Those go a-a-b-b-a-a-b-b etc. so it’s easy to get two adjacent ...


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That very typically happens when either the wire is improperly positioned on a screw (e.g. too much naked wire sticking out; there should be essentially none), or a bare ground wire is flopping around and hitting a screw, and I understand in the UK you sleeve the bare ground wires so that's less of a problem, or the side screws are hitting the side of a ...


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Oh, why on earth did you do that? Wires are not color coded for the benefit of novice installers. They are color coded because cables only come one way: with black and white wires. Those wires serve a wide variety of functions, but they are always black and white because cables are; they are not color coded by function unless you do this yourself with ...


1

Which country? As some regs limit the number of spurs you can have and if you did not check... However, what is most likely is that one of the screws is pinching one of the wires inside the socket. Check and reposition them, but if there is damage to the conductor as well, you need to replace it.


2

It would be a code violation to have a outlet connected to a dimmer, I would want to figure out where the hot is at the dimmer and connect the outlets to that then run the dimmer only to the light and that would be code compliant.


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BRHANS Nailed it, I had a bad battery in my multimeter. Replaced the battery and I have 119 volts. Thats a fricking relief. As far as balancing my panel I know nothing about it except I read that you should try and have equal amp breakers on either side to help keep it balanced. You guys have been a great resource and I appreciate the advice!


1

The transformer can be replaced, 120 /110v transformers are the same thing just different dates when they were manufactured. For many years we called line voltage 110, later 115 now 120 so they by definition are the same to the national electric code in the US. The important part is the output voltage and the size or how many amps / watts it is rated for. ...


1

The likeliest explanation is a lost neutralaffecting several homes. This is a red alert! You should call your power company and report a power outage (seriously). The interesting thing about yours is that it doesn't move much. Normally they move a LOT when you add and remove 120V loads. That suggests it is affecting several houses and they are ...


2

Get a mm and check the voltage between the wires (phases). Ignore the green/yellow for this. If the black is neutral (likely) then the voltage between any of the other 3 and the neutral should be around 380V. Between any 2 phases (brown, gray, blue) should give you 230V. So, as the load on phases should be balanced, I suggest you get a competent ...


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Sounds like you really do want to identify/map every cable segment, and possibly every conductor in every cable in the house. A tool used for this in the telecom sector is a tone generator and amplifier probe. Extech 40180, Fluke PRO3000, and Progressive Electronics 200EP/77HP are examples. I've used the Fluke and own a Progressive (got mine used on eBay). ...


2

A typical "Magic 8-Ball" tester like the one you are using will activate with a broad range of voltages. The exact voltage will vary depending on the technology used, but I'd say it is a reasonable bet that anything between 70V and 250V (which would allow for some really messed up wiring without zapping the device or the user) will light up. The multimeter ...


2

A method I have used in the past is to have all the breakers disconnected for safety (old houses are known to have "crossed circuits"... Then have a very long cable back to the distribution board connected to a particular wire to test, then use the multimeter to test the object wires at the point of interest. Label as necessary (even down to tape with text.....


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Get yourself a good multi meter ,a plug tester,and alive circuit toner. And that is a good start. Make sure meter has a continuity setting.


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Box has to be big enough for box fill. You can call them one item as long as combined loads are equal to the circuit. Just need to find a way to make up connection. Must be some kind of box extension to add. And plug in oven and run a flex to cook top and wire in.


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Install the third light to complete circuit. If not working see if breaker is on or even hooked up. If still not working may not be hooked on to switch and check splice to see if neutrals are on wire nut. the third light may only have one wire, and that points me to breaker or switch. After all that look into outlet boxes and switch may need to be spliced ...


2

Based on your description, the likely configuration is: incoming power -> switch -> light 1 -> light 2 -> light 3 That would put two sets of wires on light 1 (switch & light 2) and light 2 (light 1 & light 3) but only one on light 3. If that's the case, then all blacks (switched hot), all whites (neutral) together at each of the lights would be ...


2

Twin brown & earth is the right cable type for a switch loop. One brown is live from consumer unit, the other is switched live to lights etc Fans often have both a switched live and a permanent live, this allows the fan to continue to run 5 mins after the light etc is switched off. It uses a timer built into the fan. This is better for clearing moist ...


1

That looks like what we call a switch loop. Power is delivered to the light, and a branch comes off to the switch. In a switch loop, one wire is always hot, and the other wire is switched-hot. Since both wires are hot, it's ideal for them to both use hot colors. So Brown and Brown are appropriate. However, a basic rule is that all related wires must be in ...


1

My best guess is that the single brown and the longest brown were together on the same terminal (the brown being possibly a supply to the next lamp), while the short brown is the switched supply to the lamp. The easy one is the yellow/green as that is the earth connection. Personally, I would use a multimeter and check out exactly what is what and find out ...


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You are lucky you got a 50amp circuit for your commercial kitchen. Enjoy. You can also plug a waffle iron in at the same time! Think of this as an upgrade. OP is wrong electrician is correct using a 50amp circuit. It won't damage anything.


1

Many ways to do this. First, is this the main panel? If so, SEU is the wire needed. Two hots And a ground. If you have a meter main, or breaker outside, then the panel is a sub-panel and you need 4 wire ser. I don't see why you can not nipple through meter into panel. And remove the short studs in the way. Use pvc as it's a little easier to work with. ...


4

I would use EMT conduit and #10 THWN stranded wires. One white wire and two wires that are black, brown, red, orange, yellow, pink, blue or purple. They can be the same color. EMT is its own grounding path, but if you want to be a completist, also run a single #10 green or bare wire. Terminate that at a NEMA 14-30 socket. If the dryer has a 3-prong ...


2

I see where there is a cripple wall or something preventing you from fitting the new taller panel where the Zinsco had been. Well first, I would go back to the drawing board and see if I could find a panel that fits inside the space the old Zinsco is coming out of. However your first priority is a whole lot of spaces, so I would only bother looking at CH ...


0

You do not want a stalled motor to "hang in there" during brownout etc. Size it to about 15 will add protection; not detract. 20 Amp might well be the poorer choice.


2

Thank you for letting me see that. That... is Zinsco's implementation of a "Rule of Six" panel. The obsolete "Rule of Six" is that you could have up to six main breakers to shut off your house. That's because houses were getting bigger and bigger electrical service, yet breakers larger than 60A were still very expensive. So a traditional main breaker ...


1

Those clips are for what were called "feed through" breakers. The breakers with those clips are NOT electrically connected to the bus bars, they are just mounted to them structurally. So in this case the upper grey 2 pole breaker with the red box around it is acting like a "sub-main" breaker. It is connected to the bus, then the load wires of that breaker ...


2

Do you have the original breaker that was powering these circuits? Does it have two separate connection screws with the black in one and the red in the other or were the black and red in the same connection point secured with the same screw? The presence of the red wire suggests you have a MWBC with two hots (B & R) and one neutral W. If so, this is ...


4

The electrician did you no favor . You have a multi fed circuit and the handle ties on the breaker should be together.So both go the same ,and all neutrals should be spliced together to work . Neutral has a load in this case. And could lead to injury.


5

Looks like tabs need to be pushed, or screw driver lifts tab for release.


1

Move some of the lights to the fire alarm circuit. It lightens the load of the other lighting circuit and you then have an incentive to keep it on rather than just turning it off at the breaker and or possibly not noticing that the breaker tripped without you knowing.


10

That is BS, running a bigger wire is better. And now he installed the wrong breaker, which is worse and should be changed.


0

Your wire sizing is fine Motor conductors are sized as a continuous load (125% of Full Load Amps), so 12AWG is more than adequate for an 11A motor. But your choice of wiring method is partly off the mark However, unjacketed MC cable like what you linked is not suitable for wet locations or direct burial, so it can't be used outside. Furthermore, since ...


0

If panel takes that type of breaker your fine and,need 2 hots and 2 neutrals. If 3 wire need 2 pole breaker,and all neutrals spliced together ,and pigtail to recpt. May be panel not rated for tandem.


-1

Keep it simple. 20 amp to recpts is fine. Smokes can or should go on the light circuit. !5 amp at 180 va gives 9 loads on a 15 amp ,12 on a 20 amp .If window ac run a home run to it.RV should have own circuit,even a single 30 .Could run 10-2 install recpt ,and if you need more power change breaker and outlet . If not always needed. Bath should have 20 amp ...


3

Lost in translation The inspector is giving you the standard warning not to use double-stuff breakers on MWBC (shared neutral) circuits. Sounds like you fully understand that requirement... and they aren't telling you anything new


1

Bathroom circuits. Make it two per bathroom. That way you can use more than one hair appliance at once. The ladies of the house will thank you!


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The code allows using wire larger than required. It is actually required when wire runs are longer than normal, and has the advantage of lower voltage and power loss when loaded heavily. The code expects up to 3% voltage drop, which represents about 3% wasted power, and stresses AC motors. Motors tend to supply constant power, which requires extra current at ...


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