New answers tagged

2

Electricians have debated this for a long time with no decisive winner, so it's a safe bet there's no right or wrong answer, both ways have merit. But the layout you propose is fine. Some decide based on cost considerations. Some like the additional power available per room. Some think it's bad for the lights to go out when someone trips a breaker with a ...


0

If forced to guess the red bare end goes to R and the white plug to 'HUM' and the other two plugs to the bottom terminals of the relay.


5

Using 15A light switches to switch <15A on a 20A branch circuit is OK, unless you're switching receptacles! As it turns out, NEC 404.14(A) permits the use of a snap switch (general light switch) to control any hardwired, non-motor load up to its rating, or motor loads under specific conditions (informational notes omitted): 404.14 Rating and Use of ...


5

By NEC you typically could. You would need to add a ground rod if you don't already have one. A single circuit doesn't require a ground rod, a panel will. I would throw a little caution here, my well isn't too deep, only 200 feet. I have a 1.5 hp 10.6A motor controller says 12A pump max. Well is 200 ft from the service, that's 400 ft of wire. Voltage drop ...


3

Red is carrying switched-hot off to another location where a light might have been fed from. It's not going straight back to the panel. If you follow it you'll probably come to a good place to fork off more light fixtures. Red is the preferred color for switched-hot. Now there are a few issues with this box. It's extremely over-full. You have 11 wires in ...


8

Assuming it's 8/4 copper wire, you could even use a 40A breaker to protect it - if aluminum wire, 30A. You have a 4-wire feed, and you'll need to isolate the ground and neutral in the sub-panel. If your well casing is metallic, presumably it's already tied into the ground wire - if not, it should be (they make one heck of a ground rod.)


0

This is a single circuit a 220v circuit to the spa controller is all you have the mfg then can split that off and there are probably fuses or breakers on that circuit coming from the controller. As long as the equipment is listed and the instructions tell you to use the light it is part of the MFG assembly that you ran 1 circuit to and would be legal if you ...


2

They have more flexibility in how the AC is installed than if they'd used NM. For example, in most areas, the NM-B cable you have stapled to the bottom of your joists is not allowed; it should be running through the joists like the other one. I wouldn't suggest changing it; it just doesn't meet today's standard. But if that NM-B on the bottom of the joists ...


1

Since this is a ceiling box the wiring is probably designed for a light fixture. As such it will have a neutral (which would be the white wires connected together, but it may have only a switched hot and not a line hot (which is always hot). But it is possible that it contains a line hot. The first task would be to find out if you have an always hot in the ...


2

Step one would be to confirm the function of the wires -- that might involve looking into the circuit breaker panel and the wiring compartment on the heaters. You might use a volt meter and/or a non-contact voltage detector to confirm which is the hot/live wire and which is the switched live/load wire going to the heater. Based on the diagram you showed for ...


1

REWRITE: Having the 3-way travelers go through the fan box is quite unusual, but I was "going on faith" on that. However, given the behavior of the supposed "supply" wires you mention in comments, notably white being hot and black being pulled down to 0V... it's clear this is a 3-way switch loop. Neutral is not present at the box at all....


2

Looks GOOD! you've got the neutral stubbed off at the switch (for future upgrade to smart switch) you've got switched hot to all the outlets and neutral connected to each the red black color switch is a bit confusing but works you will also need your ground to each of them IF this is outdoors, the first outlet in the chain should be a GFCI outlet in which ...


0

A hot white wire is normally part of a switch loop. The white being always hot keeps it from being confused as a neutral. After you read this entire answer If you connect the black and white on that cable it will probably activate a light or garbage disposal or another device in a kitchen. Please read the last sentence prior to trying this. I hope you have ...


1

From your description, it sounds like the green wire is live, the black wire is connected to the entry light and the red wire is connected to the patio light. There is no ground or neutral coming to the box. The EJ351 timer switch is specifically advertised as not requiring a neutral connection. Try turning on either light and then measuring the voltage on ...


2

Nobody likes switched outlets, uurgh. Why not simply wire the new lights in? You could However, working from what 3phaseE mentioned, pop the tab and make each outlet half hot half switched. That wouldn't smell so bad....


6

I'd just use 14/3 throughout If I were in your shoes, I'd use 14/3 throughout this circuit (homerun aside of course) with black as the always hot, red as the switched-hot, and white as the neutral. Why? Well, someone down the road, maybe even you, might want to change one or more of the receptacles to constant power from being switched, and without always-...


0

Yes, that's acceptable. The 12 ga. wire is good for 20A and that coupled with a 20A breaker will give you what you need.


6

I want to use cable with copper conductors instead of aluminum if at all possible. You really can't buy aluminum branch cable anymore, so copper is your only route here. I would suggest going the extra mile here and buying some Alumiconns and converting to copper (they can be bought in 2-packs if you don't want to buy more than you need right now). Contrary ...


5

I think that's going to be your best bet. Splicing aluminum to copper is the issue, you need special connectors and hear all kinds of horror stories. If the connection is through the receptacle, and the receptacle terminals are rated CO/ALR, you've walked around the trap.


0

Often times when people run into this, the LEDs are incompatible with dimmers. Check the package when you buy replacements to make sure they are “dimmable” otherwise you will have this issue. Another issue with the newer fans (read the instruction on wiring) is they state “not to connect to dimmers”. After contacting the company (Tech Dept), they cited ...


5

Assuming that you have supply - 14/2 -- 3-way switch -- 14/3 --- 3 way switch --- 14/2 light fixture yeah, you can do that. you have something like this: convert it to this:


2

The switch should be prior to the transformer for several reasons. First this kills power to the transformer; if the lamps were only disconnected, even with no load, transformers waste power. This use of power usually increases with age and later it may start buzzing as the core delaminates. The power usage in this case is from eddy currents. Second, with ...


0

You CAN have two 3-way dimmers on the same circuit if you use smart switch such as Lutron’s Caseta. This is possible because one dimmer is wired and the other is operated by Bluetooth. Works very well. You can even controll the dimmer through Alexa or your smart phone. Im not, by any means, an electrician and I was able to set up my kitchen and hallways.


1

I just so happened to have my electrician come out the day after I posed this question. For those wondering, I was fully comfortable with @NoSparksPlease answer, and was expecting them to go with a 40A breaker and #8AWG wire. However, after looking at the motor specs the electrician suggested 30A and #10AWG wire. He said they had wired several this way and ...


1

Check your existing connections with the photos of the original connections before you took them apart. Either you changed something or made an incorrect connection to the new fitting compared to the old one , so those photos from before will help you sort the issue.


2

It's an earlier type of armored cable referred to in the day as BX -- common in the early-mid 1900s. We have a ton of that stuff in my house. The wires are insulated with rubber and cloth (they started using modern PVC insulation in the 1950s). Code dictates that metal boxes and any exposed metal parts in the wiring system be grounded. The outer metal ...


0

You need a 12/3 (black/red/white/ground) cable between the fan and the switch location. You can no longer use a "switch loop" which is how that "used to be done" with a 12/2 cable, because current codes require a neutral at the switch location. Black (hot) to the switch, red (switched hot) from the switch to the fan.


2

You are in the wrong section, 440 is refer equipment, you need too roll back to section 430, Motors, Motor circuits, and Controllers. Part III Motor and Branch circuit protection Then look at label: Continuous duty motor, Section 430.32. More than 1 HP, Paragraph (A). Thermally Protected, (2) A thermal protector integral with the motor, check, now we're ...


1

For a safe and code compliant setup, everything has to be compatible: the breaker the wire the receptacle the range cord / plug the range itself What you can use is determined by the range; the manufacturer's instructions will state what operating voltage and ampacity is suitable for the electrical circuit. The breaker is the main safety device, it ...


0

What is the amp requirement for the range? If it is 30A or less, the #10 wire is fine. If it is 40A, the #10 is too small. And what size breaker is at the other end of those #10 wires? If it is 30A, again OK, 40A and it has been dangerous all along.


0

Long shot, but I'll add my experience: is there anything above these lights that could be wet? We had one flickering LED light in our kitchen. All the other lights, replaced at the same time, were fine. A little while later we noticed that the second floor bathtub (directly above the kitchen) had a small leak, which was letting water into the wall, which ...


2

Your plan is solid and well thought out in my opinion. The one thing that may give you problems with GFCI receptacles is wire fill and box size. GFCI receptacles are big and sometimes a real bugger to get in some locations just be aware of this but I prefer GFCI’s locally even when they are tight. You don’t have to pull a ground for every circuit back to the ...


2

When UL lists the device, they list the instructions along with it. The reason for the "DO NOT" instruction is because the instructions in the GFCI device are written for the specific case of one cable in; and 0 or 1 cable out. UL would not approve more complex instructions to handle every case; so the instructions say to get professional help if ...


4

This sounds like you don't know much about conduit, and you're proceeding anyway, which will produce a homebrew hatchet job. Don't do it. Follow Code, and skill up as needed. PVC conduit must be buried with 18" of cover. If you don't want to dig that far, use Rigid Metal Conduit (RMC or IMC) which requires 6" of cover. Cover means dirt on top ...


1

First off, you're not allowed to assemble conduit around cable. It has to be a continuous run assembled to specs. You'd be surprised and how many bends you can pull through with stranded THHN wire when you need to replace it. If you know the cable is bad, you might want to think about replacing it now while you're doing all the rework. Just a thought.


4

It does seem like your voltage drop is calculated with 50A load, which I think may be a bit conservative, taking liberty on one or two factors usually will get you by, but taking liberty on every calculation leads to trouble, I would increase your wire one or maybe two sizes, 4/0 I think is going a little far. The NEC only addresses voltage drops in ...


7

Don't panic! And don't oversize the wires unnecessarily. 250' is a typical distance in AC mains wiring; I suspect you're familiar with calcs intended for low voltage/electronics. For them, 250' is "Here there be dragons" territory :) Now, my rule of thumb is I don't even bother looking at a voltage drop calc until the distance is over 180'. You ...


3

Honestly, if it were me, I'd make full use of the proudness to solve the rough surface problem. I'd get a 2-gang outdoor rated extension box - what makes an extension box special is it has an large opening at the back that is 1-gang sized, that basically makes it a box extension not another box. I say "choose the box" so you know how big its ...


5

For your described loads (if you were actually running welder and compressor at the same time with some assumed lights on) AWG #1 aluminum should be fine (50A-ish load) I like this voltage drop calculator, it has no artificial limits. There is not (to my knowledge) any limit in code to how far you can go, but there are practical issues that come into play ...


3

The problem I see is your wire fill with 4 ea #8 wires counted at 3 cubic inches each you are at 12 without a clamp. I would probably be looking at a double gang bell box. One thing that regularly has to be done in industrial facilities is modifications to boxes or gutters. I would verify your local AHJ will allow this on residential. I would cut the back of ...


9

Your first, and only question that I see, is whether or not you can run 275 ft. of underground feeder wire to your barn. The answer is: Yes, you can provided you use wire large enough so that the voltage drop at the barn is acceptable to your use. As noted in your question, the commonly accepted value is 3%. For long runs (i.e. large wire sizes) Al wire is ...


1

If I understand the diagram correctly, you connected hot from the duplex receptacle to the switch (correct) and then from the same screw on the switch to the single receptacle (wrong). You also connected neutral to the switch (wrong). Basically, you treated the switch as if it were another receptacle, when actually it should only be in the hot wire. Remove ...


4

I'm pretty sure you wired your switch wrong, and "off" (so you think) is a dead short.


4

Your wiring configuration is an old style switch loop, which does not provide neutral. To stop killing brain cells, stop violating Code. Any solution that violates Code, cross it off immediately: kill it with fire before it kills you with fire. All that stuff you saw in Amazon reviews and Youtube videos are jackasses trying to burn their house down (plus, ...


0

The breaker limits the current to the whole circuit. The breaker actually reacts to the heat in the breaker. Higher current in the breaker creates more heat in the breaker. The rules about minimum wire size allowed is evaluation of the ability of the insulation to not melt under maximum load. Larger wire creates less heat when current flows through it. ...


4

The breaker doesn't know about the heating of the wire. The breaker has its own internal "specimen wire" that is in series with the wall wire. It is measuring how fast its "specimen wire" heats up, and will trip at the appropriate time. Literally, the "specimen wire" is a bi-metal strip, which provides both the sense and the ...


2

It's the current that trips the breaker, not the heat of the wire. You could have 1/0 copper going to a 15 amp breaker (it won't fit) and draw 20 Amps and it would trip the breaker.


2

The breaker senses the current through the breaker. It does not care what size wire is connected to it, nor "sense" that in any way. Thus, the 14Ga wire is protected by the 15A breaker - neither the 12Ga wire nor an outlet play any role in the protection.


1

I've seen it done both ways but the feed to the switch is more common. You'll probably have a black and white coming into the switch the black will be pigtailed to the switch and to a black wire going to the outlet. you'll also have a red connected to the switch going to the outlet. The white coming in will be connected to a white going to the outlet. At the ...


0

If you're turning off breakers one at a time and it's still registering a signal then there's possibly two circuits going through that switch box, there is a live wire behind the wall which is neighboring that switch box, or the switch's wiring is simply getting cross-talk from a neighboring wire somewhere before or after the switch. You should turn off all ...


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