New answers tagged

0

Surface mounting of ceiling wiring is allowed by code but looks DIY and some will think it’s not code even though it is. The only thing you mention is the wire size of #14 for this to be code compliant the circuit breaker protecting the circuit will need to be 15 amp other than that it could be ok.


6

There's a concept called grandfathering which says If the work was legal on the day it was installed, then when Code changes later, it's still legal. You're not required to tear out a bunch of wiring every 3 years when Code is revised. This gets into a lot of lawyering about when the work was done and what was legal then. However we can safely pass ...


2

Based on the diagram (with yellow => white), it looks pretty straightforward, but actual pictures instead of drawings would confirm the details: Box A: Cable 1 = 3-way. Red & Black = travelers. White = switched hot. Cable 2 = Light fixture. Red = switched hot. Black = always hot for use in other stuff past the light fixture. White = neutral. Cable 3 =...


1

Generally speaking, wires within reach need to be protected. Above 9 feet is out of reach, doesn't need to be protected, so conduit not required. If you use conduit then you can use separate wires. If you don't use conduit then you use cable - normally non-metallic cable, aka Romex. However, you do not normally need GFCI on permanently wired lighting (except ...


2

There are multiple problems here. Assuming the work met code when done, they may not be active problems, but certainly not to current codes. Item the first - Apartments, plural - fine if landlord is paying electric bill, not fine otherwise. If tenants pay for electricity, you need a separate metered service for each tenant plus a separate metered service ...


1

Before you replace the wire test it to see if it is damaged. First shut the breaker off to the water heater. Next separate the power cable from the water heater wire. The water heater's power wire usually runs to the thermostat. Remove it from the terminal screw. With a continuity tester touch a lead to each end of the black wire which should show continuity....


1

The fixture you show has an accessible junction box. First, remove the three sheet metal screws inside the can at the edge. Push the can up into the space. Then there is a spring tab you can reach on the junction box. You can see one of the two tabs in the phot in this post. The other side of the junction box will have the same setup. In your case, the ...


6

Clamps/fittings need to be NRTL (UL/ETL) Listed, and the instructions on or with the fittings are part of the Listing, and will indicate the number and type of cables allowed.


12

You can, but you need a 3/4" KO and the correct clamp to do so If you're working with a 3/4" or larger knockout, you can get 3 12/2 or 12/3 NM cables into it. You just need a cable clamp that's listed/rated for that many cables; fortunately, the Arlington NM842 is cheap and fits the bill perfectly here. It can even accept 4 12/2, or 2 12/3 and 1 ...


1

This is a common configuration, the thermostat shows terminal 2 as the line. With 240v split phase heating it is very common to only open one of the hot conductors this makes for a cheaper thermostat. (This leaves 120v to ground live even when the thermostat is in the off position. I would see where the line connected to terminal 2 goes where it joins up ...


9

Definitely not allowed! If you want to do that, then shop for certain spec-grade switches and receptacles ($3 instead of 60 cents), which have a feature some call "Screw-and-clamp". This allows you to back-wire 2 wires under each screw, and you tighten the screw to clamp the wires. Also note that since it's in a metal box, your switch does not ...


5

No, at least on the type pictured. You can only have one wire per screw. Your idea of a pig tail is exactly what you should do. There do exist terminals that can support more than one wire, but this does not appear to be one.


1

That junction box looks like it sits below the ceiling ~2” with that space I would notch for a surface mount wireway square in shape or punch a hole for a 1/2” conduit and run to another surface mount box and suspend the pendant light from that, all the splices would be in boxes accessible and be code compliant.


1

You could use surface mounted box's and raceway. You would need one box extension on the existing box, this will allow you mount your pendent and then run a raceway, containing the wiring, to a second surface mounted box. The examples i linked to are all not the same brand, just examples to illustrate what i am talking about. If you go to the home centers ...


3

Did not ultimately get a lot of help here, but I figured it out myself, so posting in case there are others who run into a similar situation. The first key was figuring out how the wires in each box matched up. I connected D, the hot wire, first to A, then to B, which helped me figure out which two wires in the switch box they matched up to. C I knew was the ...


0

So here's the thing. Your switch doesn't need to have its ground wired: Since it's a metal box, the switch will pick up ground via its metal yoke and the mounting screws. (note this works for switches, not receptacles). If your plan is to use a spare ground screw, that's fine.


7

This is better done with conduit As it turns out, 4/2 NM-B cable isn't even made; you could use a 4/3 NM-B cable, but that's upwards of $4/ft. You are much better off wiring this using a 1" ENT ("smurf tube") with a couple of 4AWG THHNs for the hots and an 8AWG THHN ground. Even in copper, this costs less than $3/ft; if you went with 2AWG ...


8

A cable with two insulated 4 AWG wires and an uninsulated grounding wire in a common sheath (which is what makes them a cable.) You might need a real electrical supplier, rather than Homely's Despot to find that. It's a bit out of their usual range of product.


2

If the box is grounded by the conduit, you can get self tapping grounding screws and screw one into the hole in the back of the box. Then wrap your ground from your NM cable around the grounding screw and tighten. Use the proper NM to box connector. Make sure you're not in an area that requires conduit. In my humble opinion, the wiring shown in the lower box ...


1

Neutral's on the far left, Switched Live is on the far right, Earth is at the bottom Looking at your ceiling rose and the mixture of old-UK and IEC color coding present there, we can tell from the combination of two blacks and a blue going into the far left block that it's the Neutral (Return) side of this ceiling rose. Given that we know the fixture can't ...


4

You're pretty much right on target. Wire nut the two black wires in the box to one black wire from the switch. Check to make sure the switch instructions don't specify "line" and "load" on the wires. One of your black wires in the box is your always hot and the other one is a tap off the hot to another location, probably the always hot on ...


1

SOLVED: GREEN & WHITE FROM THE OVEN WENT TO THE BARE SILVER BLACK WENT TO NEUTRAL BLACK RED WENT TO HOT BLACK OVEN WORKS Not Exactly... First issue is nomenclature: You said "BLACK WENT TO NEUTRAL". No, black (oven) went to WHITE (house wiring). With a 3-wire oven connection, white is a hot wire. 240V (US) uses 2 hots, neutral and ground. In ...


1

Two concerns that I know of: Water If the wire is at least a few inches off the floor then this is a non-issue. But if it is literally on the floor then water - whether deliberate from washing the floor or accidental from an overflow - could get into the cable and cause problems because standard NM cable is not rated for wet areas. Physical Protection As ...


1

Each of these cables is a switch loop. In theory, the taped white (red or blue) is the always-hot wire and the black wire is the switched-hot. However, it could be the reverse. There are two easy ways to tell: Open up the fan and light and see which wire is connected to another black (= always hot) and which is connected to the fan or light (= switched hot) ...


4

It's the bundle of bare wires in the rear right of the box Since we are dealing with NM cables here, we know we need to look for a bundle of bare wires in order to find our grounding connection. As it turns out, there is a bundle of bare wires heading through the center of the box and into a wirenut in the back right; it's simply not obvious that they're ...


3

THHN in EMT is generally less expensive than MC, and much more capable as well (i.e. MC is what it is - cable, 12/2 or 12/3 or whatever, while 1/2" EMT can support up to 4 circuits on 12 or 14 gauge (more wires than that on 14 gauge but you run into derating issues which make sticking to 4 the safer bet for planning.) If your needs are simple and you ...


1

I know that this is late and that there's an accepted answer saying otherwise, but I'm going to chime in to support of the patch-panel-per-floor as designed. Sure, it's probably overkill for home use, however, as designed you've got 30 cable runs. 24-port switches are designed for commercial use and are significantly more expensive than 16-, 12-, 10-, or 8-...


0

It appears that you're taking individual wires out of cables and running them in different directions. Don't do that. From S1 (see labeled image, below), you've got your red & black travelers running toward S2, but you've got the white (I presume that's what the orange line represents) going to C5. Disconnect the white/neutral from C5 and allow it to ...


4

The installer thought they could use 2 cables to get 4 conductors. Not allowed per 300.3(B) due to AC magnetic effects (the same thing that makes transformers work that makes it even possible for the general public to have electric power.) Use smart switches which use either wireless or powerline signaling, such as Intsteon... and then you can do this. ...


3

First, the US, most countries, and now all countries worldwide have harmonized on safety ground being bare, green, or yellow w/ green stripe. So that's easy. Done. You will need a letter from Bosch either indicating approval by UL (or some other NRTL) or saying something that will satisfy your AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction). This will be required for ...


3

Sorry, but no, not with normal current wiring practices You have 4 wires that need to make it from box 1 to box 2: Travelers (2) for the 3-way switches Hot for the outdoor light Neutral for all the lights You have 4 wires. But they are not combined properly. The problem is that the neutral needs to include all the return current for all matching hots. That ...


0

The most likely wiring combination for that switch/receptacle would be ; the black wires with the wire nut would be hot to the switch and receptacle, the single black wire would go to the light as the switch leg and the whites would be the neutral for the receptacle. Use a voltage meter and check it out. Voltage from the blacks and white with the wire nuts ...


0

One of the 3 black wires is hot. Your switch side could go in the way it was to the new switch. Connect the silver screw to the white wires (for the outlet side) a pig tail works best here. What you have to figure out is the hot wire, not hard. You know the black you hooked up to the outlet is not the hot . So you have 2 other choices once you have the ...


0

Since you broke the tab, you have (electrically) two separate devices, so you will need one extra wire instead of two. But no big deal. You will need one extra piece of black wire and one extra piece of white wire, and two wire nuts to replace the existing wire nuts. Screw colors are based on the picture & instructions from the linked switch. Others may ...


0

As Ed Beal says, check if it's in conduit -- that'd be an easy way to add that fourth wire, which is the best solution. However, in case it's not in conduit, I want to also answer your direct question of if there's a way to add safety to a grandfathered 3-wire feed without adding the fourth wire, because there is: make sure all your feeder connections are ...


3

When the building was built code was probably 3 wire ( this was the standard for decades). What you have was quite common until the1999 NEC code change. A 200 amp feed would normally be in conduit and if metallic that could be used to meet today’s code. If it is a direct buried feeder and you feel the need to update it a separate ground wire is now allowed, ...


1

With the information provided I would say NO. The blue wire is there 240v common it is usually similar to our neutral this being the first NO because our 240v is split each leg has 120v that are out of phase both are hot if this is the case that is a direct short to ground with split 240 power. The second NO is that a majority of there power is 50Hz jumping ...


2

The specs indicate that it's compatible with what's common in the USA, specifically 240V, 60Hz. What you need to do, however, is refer to the installation manual and hook up the two HOT wires to your two service HOT wires and the GROUND connection to the GROUND wire. Do not rely on colors as these are not guaranteed! In the USA, the two HOTs for 240V are ...


23

Switches don't have silver screws (unless they have brains inside) Your rule about "black to brass, white to silver" is a good rule of thumb for how receptacles are wired. However, since a "dumb" lightswitch simply connects terminals to other terminals, it needs no connection to the neutral wire at all, and thus has no silver screw on it ...


10

Simple switch loop. Standard switch (not 3-way). So black to one brass screw. White to the other brass screw. That's all. Done.


0

Connecting ground and neutral together in an appliance is bad from a safety point of view and is likely to trip upstream GFCIs/RCDs if-any (though I don't think Americans normally have GFCIs on drier circuits) but it will not cause any problems for the appliance itself.


0

Power the heat pad through dusk to dawn sensor. Most are for bulb sockets, which you can convert with a socket-to-plug adapter, but there's also plug-only switchers with photocells. if ambient light isn't enough to trigger cleanly, get an extension cord from the timer's output and plug in both the grow light and a nightlight to it. Then tape the nightlight ...


2

1/2” plywood is legal and would work great in this case pop all the anchors slip the wood in place and everything will be to code NEC exhibit 334.1 has a great example of exactly this. Your example is a good one but I tend to go directly to the code book as it is the document most jurisdictions use in the US and that is my location.


1

You could use a smart plug like a Shelly Plug which will allow you to set up time with built-in tools to automatically turn on and off at dawn and dusk and be controllable with a smart phone. The advantage is that the Shelly is smart enough to automatically adjust to changing daylight hours, which a wall timer will not usually do. It's hard to argue with the ...


1

Yes, if you already have a Schuko socket (and it's the only socket on that circuit), you can just put a plug like that on the cable and plug it in. 16A at 230V is 3680W, which is probably what the 3700W actually is (rounded up for marketing purposes). Edit: I noticed in the instructions for the induction hob that it's possible to limit the power used by the ...


0

Options are to enclose the panel as suggested by inspector or staple no more then 12" from panel. If panel mounted to a backer board, 3/4 ply ? then can staple directly to that each wire separately or a 1x board across top of panel secured to adjacent studs, the wire stapled to that


0

I would definitely check all wiring yo endure that different gushes weren't used and were properly installed.


8

Or... just run the jacketed cable through the conduit It is permissible to run the entire, jacketed NM-B cable through the conduit. The restriction is that it takes a mighty bite out of conduit fill, because the NM-B cable must be treated the same as a round conductor of the wide dimension. This is particularly punishing when there are 2 "wires" (...


0

This was a great question with equally great answers so far. I'd like to provide more clarity on part 1 of your question. I'm a Canadian Electrician, but the rules are usually pretty close in the US - always good to check with a local electrician or inspector. The electrical code says no branch should have more than 3% voltage drop. Assuming your 0A ...


22

The wires in NM aren't labeled for use outside the cable jacket, and may not be the correct type for use in conduit to begin with First off, the wires inside a NM cable are not marked or labeled at all, which automatically makes them unsuitable for use in a conduit wiring method, as NEC 310.120 requires conductor insulation to be marked/labeled with the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included