New answers tagged

2

Your system has no "C" wire brought out to the connector. This is not uncommon as many systems don't. If you need a "C" wire, you'll want to connect it here:


2

I'd use a 4/0-4/0-2/0-4 Mobile Home Feeder cable for this job Given that you aren't going to be pushing a full 200A over the cable (which'd require 250kcmil Al, since the 83% reduction in 310.15(B)(7) doesn't apply to your situation), but need a 4-wire cable as your shed is getting powered by a feeder from your service disconnect at the pole, I'd use a 4/0-4/...


1

Remember: the run from service panel to first AFCI must be either metal-jacketed cable or metal conduit. I would find that drawing very confusing. It's always a struggle to show neutral on a white background (hint: don't), but what ere they thinking? White is the legally required neutral color, and black is the conventional hot color. So that bung ...


0

Your plan has a good chance of succeeding as I have done similar work and was successful. I would suggest adding a new junction box, old work box, close to your existing outlet. You can't just go around eliminating outlets because you need the box. Code requires where you need to put them. Just add a new box, pigtail the feed from the existing outlet to the ...


0

Drop the wire in the outside wall behind the bell. Either in the stud bay or maybe if there is space behind the wood trim do it there. Then drill from outside, at the level of the box, straight into a side punch out of the box. The only visible patch is to the wood. Much easier to patch up white painted wood at shin level than to patch the wall where ...


1

I don't think it would be a good idea. It would be vital you to know the possible ambient temperature of the space you are running you're conductors or cabling while the heater was running. Basic apprenticeship instruction teaches that heat has the greatest effect on the function of your circuitry. NEC Table 310.15(B)(2) shows the multiplier you should use ...


1

I am adding a new answer instead of editing as my original answer still is my recommendation since I don’t know your local AHJ. The 2020 code has updates on MC/AC bundling, with focus in 1 area of code usually other methods are also more closely examined at the professional level and DIY more so. Code allows cables to be run together but because of ...


4

Your support plans are fine; just make sure your feeder breaker is 90A or less SER cable used for feeder or branch-circuit duty is treated exactly the same as a (rather fat) NM cable for support and installation-technique purposes, albeit without the 60°C working temperature limit on ampacity calculations: (4) Installation Methods for Branch Circuits and ...


4

Slow down on the hole size, unless using a conduit nipple the inspector will usually call more than 2 cables through a hole bundling (where 2 or more cables are run without spacing) so a massive hole for 8-10 ea 12 or 14 gauge cables just won’t work. Next more than 3 current carrying conductors will require derating. Drilling a series of 3/8 -3/4 holes is a ...


0

If you're going to use relays, you need at least 2 relays on the output from the Upstairs sensor to isolate that sensor's activation of both LED strips from each other, and the individual activation of the other sensors. If your sensors don't output 12v with enough current to drive the LED strips, you'd need 2 additional relays for the Lobby and Stair_Lower ...


1

Although 2 whites and a black would be unusual. In the US code allows for a grounding conductor to be pulled from the service, or any point fed from that service panel. 2 wire fixtures did not have grounds for the first 75 years of electrical code so many fixtures were not grounded. If fed by conduit and individual wires the box may be grounded through the ...


0

All metal parts has to be grounded. Check carefully your junction box, bare copper wire should be connected to screw inside the box. You can connect the ground wire from your fixture to same screw or another screw in the box. If you have wiring in your house with ground wire, the metal box body is ground. If the wire from fixture too short, make a jumper. If ...


-6

I assume that the two white wires are two lives are for two separate circuits (i. e. two lights, switchable seperately or light+ceiling fan) and the black wire is neutral. In this case, you would connect the ground to the neutral. That's the normal way to do this if you have no ground. However, I would first check what the incoming wires actually connect to. ...


3

You can certainly put some ends on the cable and find out what happens. Chances are it'll be CAT3 cable at best and the Ethernet may link at only 100 Mbps or 10 Mbps (if at all). But maybe that's good enough for you. If it's not good enough you might look at some of the G.hn equipment. The G.hn standard can be used to bridge Ethernet over AC powerline, coax, ...


5

The socket you have there is called a "Schuko" (or CEE 7/3 and 7/4, to be formal). This socket is entirely unpolarized, by nature. The socket design makes no differentiation between hot and neutral. The plug can simply be flipped over, and the two are exchanged. Part of a genuine CE listing (or the third party tested TUV, BSI etc. ratings) is ...


3

Any branch of the circuit whose hot and neutral are plugged into the "Load" terminals, will be protected from that GFCI. You are required to label those outlets "GFCI Protected" (NEC 110.3(B) and 8(C) of instructions). Use any labeling method that isn't handwritten. Also mark "No Equipment Ground" if applicable (NEC 406.4(D)2)....


0

The best way to check your plug polarity is to get some simple multimeter and measure the voltage between ground and receptacles sockets. Neutral should be close to zero. If it is blue wire, wiring is correct. Mixing the color of wires is rare mistake, electricians choose color automatically. Tester wrong is more probability.


3

I bought 3 pieces of the same tester, and all of them were wrong because they expected neutral on the left and live on the right pin. Which is wrong. I assume it is so in china or some other countries. So I had to fix those testers. I had to open them and swap wires for live and neutral. It seems your wiring was ok before, and the problem is in the tester.


1

On the SquareD website (here in year 2021) you can search for residential circuit breakers. Then select the QO line. Then select the category HM (High Magnetic) which is essentially a "slow blow". If you select one of the breakers shown, like the QO120HM, there will be PDF's to download. The one labeled "Square D QO and QOB Miniature ...


1

All connections should be made inside an enclosure with access to it. It could be even the fixture itself. You may use a connection box approved by your local electrical authority. For connecting two or more wires use existing practice by electricians in your area. In North America we typically use wire nuts. Soldering is not the best practice if you are not ...


-2

No. You are correct. Pressing the test button is an electrical test which should do absolutely nothing without power. If that is happening, either the wiring is not what you expect or the GFI outlet is defective. I suggest completely unwiring the GFI outlet to determine which is the cause. PS. It should not be necessary to remove the cover to determine if ...


4

Ok 2 parts, yes you are misunderstanding how a (listed) GFCI completes its test. The test is completed by the internal circuitry creating an imbalance. The clicking noise you hear is the mechanical debounce that helps the reset function work better (not all GFCI’s use this method but many do because who would trust a micro switch smaller than a pencil ...


1

These fans have one hot wire for powering the fan (usually the black) and another another hot wire powering the light (usu blue). These go to separate pull chain switches in the fan assembly. The fan and light share a neutral (white). Note that in your house wiring all neutrals will be white, but depending on the age of your house, white may be used for a ...


0

The answer is NO: It may be possible in theory but it may also create a direct short. In either case it would violate code (NEC). If you have 4 receptacles on 1 120v circuit the maximum that could be used would be 20 amps,,, if wired with #12 wire and a 20 amp breaker. As stated above this would be a code violation. installing a 20 amp receptacle would allow ...


6

There are spring tabs on the left side of the fitting, against the mounting plate. As you suspected, squeeze them. You'll probably need a pliers to get them tight enough to the fitting to fit back through. Loosen the screw or press the tab to release it from the flex conduit.


14

No, that's illegal and has always been illegal. You are confusing neutral and ground, which is understandable since they go to the same place in the main panel. However they are actually different and separate; they are tied together in the main panel and that is the only reason they're allowed on the same bus. Don't let that confuse you. The water heater ...


1

To me that looks like the exterior wall. Notice the expanded metal and the stucco pressed through. I don’t think that I would be drilling through that. Have someone go outside and you tap on the wall I bet they can find the spot proving it is the exterior. That is some what unusual but I would at least check that before going further.


1

You are in pretty good shape here. The metal conduit can serve as the grounding connection to the main panel, but having the neutrals and ground bonded in the sub-panel is a no-no. It's not a hard fix. Just move all the grounds to a bus bar attached to the panel (You may have to buy one and install it), and remove any bonding from the neutral to ground. I'm ...


0

If that was my project, I would replace the removed stone since you do not know what you have accessed. That metal thing may be the flue or something that you shouldn't touch. I would rather install a receptacle in the ceiling if you have access from above. Another item would be the amount of heat that flows up the stone front. It could overcome the ...


6

Get a bigger nut/connector (or more of them) You're right to be concerned about cramming the existing wirenut over its capacity. The solution, though, is to either use a larger nut/connector (such as an 8-port push-in type connector) or two smaller nuts connected to each other by a piece of white wire of the appropriate gauge.


1

That panel is already populated with many double-stuff breakers, so no loving there for making more room. Unless you are willing to replace the entire main panel with one that has more spaces, your best bit (A little IT slang there!), would be to install a sub-panel. Feed it from the last remaining 240 v space with a capacity appropriate for your bitcoin ...


0

It must be a 20A breaker, 12 AWG or larger wire. Can't use a 25A breaker. You can put as many 6-20 receptacles on the circuit as you want, as long as you don't exceed 20A total. However, your actual usage for continuous loads should be 80% = 16 A. 3 x 5.8, if that's the real constant load, it's almost 18A.


2

Go with the larger dimmer. It will allow you to add higher wattage bulbs down the road. Your 9 watt LED bulb is equivalent to a 60 watt standard bulb. That's a middle of the road wattage so allow for larger bulbs.


0

As you probably know the 3-way on diagram A is the second switch and connects to the 3 way on diagram B which in turn goes to the light. I'm almost certain the to lights you wish to control separately are setup in series which means you cannot control them separately from the wired switches without disconnecting the second light and adding a new wire to one ...


0

The NEC in 250.130(C) now requires extending an Equipment Ground Conductor to the grounding system when making an extension of a two-wire circuit that does not have an EGC. If your circuit was extended before the current requirement or was extended by local exception then the receptacle needs to be marked " No Equipment Ground" and the ground ...


0

That "eBay special" is not made for the UK market. Amazon has a program called "Amazon Marketplace" where anybody can sell anything on the Amazon platform, and the listings lurk among real Amazon listings. This means Amazon is full of eBay-tier junk, and it is flooded with cheap Chinese merchandise which ignores every safety regulation, ...


0

What you show on the lamp is L for the switched supply and N for the neutral. Is is possible to put the switch in the neutral line theoretically but that can put someone in danger as the lamp will always be live. Get a multimeter and check out the connections, this is not an opportunity for guesswork.


0

The three browns need to stay connected together to provide power to the switch for this and to other installed lamps. You could use a 3-way Wago block or other approved connector. you'll need the same for the blues unless your new lamp provides a connector for them too.


1

Connect your pendant to the leftmost and rightmost terminal in this picture. Your pendant should have brown and blue wires that correspond. If it has a yellow, green, or bare wire connect that to the corresponding large terminal at the top of the picture. One brown/blue pair in the center set of terminals is power coming in, and another brown/blue pair is ...


0

Following your scenario, modify the wiring like this: This requires adding one conductor to the run between the switch and the existing outlet. If your wiring is in conduit then this should present no serious problem.


0

trying to make sense of your sense pull out a 20 amp 240 volt circuit out of the panel, install it in a junction box beside panel feed that junction box from that breaker, parallel it with your sense voltage leads using the proper connectors. nipple out of mains section of your panel using a proper bushing and sized large enough for sense connector to fit ...


0

First, the Sense takes a tiny amount of power. It doesn't need a 50A breaker (if it did, it would need a water-cooling system that was quite large!) So it's no problem for the Sense to share breakers with other circuits. Look at your circuit breakers (possibly pull one out, no need to detach the wire). See if it has markings that indicate it accepts 2 ...


0

Don’t put this device on anything larger than a 20 amp circuit. these monitors draw very little power and putting them on a large breaker is asking for problems if and when things go bad. Use a 15 or 20 amp circuit to power the system then if the worst happens you won’t be rewiring the entire panel. If your breakers allow 2 wires per breaker great add the ...


-2

The type of screw terminals you have never makes reliable connections to stranded wires, the strands tend to come out and squeeze out when thermal cycling. Even with solid wire it needs to be thick enough to fill the hole, or it can wiggle around and get out. If you want to use stranded wire with screw terminals, get a hexagonal crimper for $20 on aliexpress:...


13

You are correct in addressing this, but the ring terminal isn't the right tool for the job You are indeed correct that 14AWG is well outside the listed/labeled range of the lugs on a 50A Siemens QP breaker -- they're rated for 8AWG through 4AWG wire only. However, nobody's tested them with ring tongue terminals either, so your ring terminal solution is off ...


0

To hide the DVR box itself, some of them come with VESA mounts and will mount to the back of the TV/the TV mount. I've also seen frames that will mount to the TV mount, then translate the mount points to the other side of the frame. You then slip the DVR (or other device) into the frame. As noted in the comments, an IR extender will work nicely to get the ...


1

As others have said without seeing you house there is no way to answer this question exactly. Some techniques that might be useful. You have an unfinished basement (this is a great start as it allows you to move horizontally below the ground floor. You don't mention it but you probably have a loft space that allows you to move horizontally above the 2nd ...


0

Have you considered WIFI? Does your main router have WIFI? If not, would you be willing to upgrade the router or add a WIFI router? You can then get a WIFI "dongle" for your office. A more sophisticated approach would be to get another WIFI capable router for your office and put it "bridge mode" with the other WIFI router. Then it ...


2

Here I'm planning a nice implementation of the advice in the accepted answer. This plan provides raw and UPS power to the basement location and also through existing house wiring to a den outlet. It includes a UPS bypass switch allowing for UPS service. The trick was to find a DPDT switch that would switch live and neutral at reasonable cost, and an inlet, ...


1

You could install one of these upstream of the outlet: https://ezgeneratorswitch.com I am not affiliated with them in any way.


Top 50 recent answers are included