New answers tagged

1

It's really time to leave mains electrical to the professionals - or at least a competent handyman with some years under his belt. The first problem is that you say this is an ordinary switch. It's not. Ordinary switches do not have built-in pigtails, and they especially don't have neutral wires. They don't use current themselves, so they don't need to ...


3

STOP!!!! You have messed things up. Sorry to be blunt. But electricity is dangerous, so this is really a big deal. Safety First Turn off the breaker for this circuit. NOW! What you have described might be fairly benign, but you might have caused some parts of your electrical system to be "hot" that should not be. Assuming you are in the US (if you are ...


1

You can wire them the same way you'd wire the white wires together and the black wires together. If there's a green or bare wire coming out of the ceiling connect it to the group of ground wires too. Use standard wire nuts or something similar to the below illustration if in the U.K.


3

A different slant on that panel. Bigger service, seriously... First, at 110A you have enough emergency heat for a Connecticut Yankee. Typically all-electric houses with that much emergency heat are supplied by "320"/400A service, powering dual side-by-side 200A panelboards. That is one way to go. Leave this panel right where it is, and lay another ...


4

Overflowing... Your existing panel is listed and labeled as a Circuit Total Limiting panelboard, which means that it can only use double-stuff/tandem breakers in spaces that are marked and designed to accept such. However, the label on your panel designates no spaces as usable with tandem breakers, only standard breaker poles, rendering your panel-stuffing ...


2

I would come out the right side instead of the bottom, and stick with a surface conduit run Given your situation (a NEMA 3R box surface-mounted indoors), I would use a nipple and suitable conduit body (it'll be either an LL or an LR, as you want the cover to face out towards you) to come up into a conduit run along the wall surface, then use a prefab sweep ...


0

If you have to go digging to lay direct burial cable, might as well run conduit so you can make any future repairs easier. Do not use EMT [thinwall] in the ground as it will rot out prematurely - pvc [sch 80] is cheap/easy to work with but some bends may need some heat applied to form moderate bends, and use long radius 90's where things turn up to make the ...


0

The problem is we don’t know your loads or total load for example if you have a max load of 75 amps #2 al wire would provide a voltage drop of 1.83% but if you want to get crazy and have 100 amps available now you are up to 1.73% voltage drop with 1/0 wire. South wire has a nice voltage drop calculator. The only part not intuitive about this is the parallel ...


3

Sticking to the "running conduit" aspect... Must be attached/supported within 3 feet of each termination. Must be supported/attached no less than 10 feet apart along run. Given things that chew wires, I'd strongly suggest sticking to conduit the whole way. But if you want to you can have a juction box and change from wires in conduit to cable in the ...


0

It is advisable to turn off the furnace power before you start opening it up and working on the wiring. If the furnace is off and not operating the gas valve in the furnace is already off so that should give you the idea that it would also be a good idea to also turn off the gas and that such action would not damage the furnace unit. Turning everything off ...


0

Check your circuit breaker panel. There should be breakers for the furnace and ac unit. Turn them all off. Also, turn off the gas just as a precaution.


6

The cable type is almost certainly BT spec CW1308, 3 pairs would be normal for UK extension wiring. It won't be to Cat5 or better spec, but over a short run and without external interference you will probably get 10Mbits over it, maybe even 100Mbits.


1

As guy that did this trade all his working life, I can DEFINITELY tell you that these proximity / non contact voltage detectors ARE NOT to be depended upon 100%. They have their place and time, and they are to be treated as such. I have a Fluke™ Volt Alert 1AC-A II and while it's a great tester, it definitely is not the "End-All" of testers and it cannot ...


20

Gigabit Ethernet If you need Gigabit Ethernet (1000Base-T), you're out of luck and will have to run new wires with CAT 5e or better cabling. It's likely not that difficult depending on your house. It seems like these jacks are above each other in the same place on each floor. Thus, you could easily drop a cable down from the upper floor and run them all ...


0

You should get a good voltage tester and check the wires at the junction box or where it connects to the well. 12/2 doesn't usually "break" and if it was way overloaded it would have burned in half or at least melted the insulation. If you determine there is in fact a break you can install a junction box.


3

I would inspect to see if the telephone cable is run in some type of conduit, but in UK that, sadly, is not always the case. If you are lucky and it is in a conduit then I would use a cable puller and run cat 6 cable up to each floor. If you are not lucky, then you could take the risk of disconnecting the telephone cable and using that to pull through two ...


0

One of the brown wires was acting as a neutral, I switched one of the wires into the neutral spot and the light switch is working fine now. If anyone knows why there is 3 brown wires please let me know. (old wiring?)


0

Call the power company, harbor police, general manager or Harbor Master, etc. Try calling the local TV news. They love chasing down that kind of stuff.


0

If you can figure out who, call or write to their Insurance carrier. Money talks surprisingly loudly. A city council or other elected body could get your ball rolling. Have you tried hizz- or her- honor? A call to non-emergency police number might do it - liability costs lots of money, nobody wants to be responsible if they’re going to be shown to have ...


1

I would call the Harbor Authority, if there is such a entity. I'd call the Harbor police, if there is such an entity as well. Good luck 👍


4

Don’t rely on colors, use a multimeter and check which is what. While it may have started out ok someone else could have played in the past... So be safe and check. I only trust wiring I have done...


1

I just finished replacing the GE motor in my unit with a Mars blower motor. I had the same issue, one extra wire. But there’s a chance the orange wire is actually the common wire and the yellow is one of the two med settings (med hi or med lo). That turned out to be the case in my unit. On my new motor, I had black, red, blue, and yellow. On the old one, it ...


1

I installed my system and looped it as I did to many other systems I installed. The advantage is no voltage drop but also give you the option to add additional lights just about everywhere in the areas long as you don't use the same path for the cable.


1

Best method for homeowners would be to plug in something with noise ( Floor fan set on "high", vacuum cleaner, corded drill motor ) and firstly look at your panel breakers to see if the circuit you're interested in turning off is labeled... If you see a "potential candidate" breaker, then turn that one off first. If not, listen, turn one off and if your ...


1

Don't loop if you don't have to The only advantage of the looping method is that it reduces voltage drop - this is not a problem for you. You have 95W of lights and with 12 gauge wire you can go 150 feet - your longest run is 59 feet. Run one pair left and another right and go from light to light until you get to the end.


0

I am going to say that looping would mean wiring everything the "straight way" THEN where the lights are attached at the furthest point away you would connect to them with a new conductors and run that set back to the either the relay or the transformer where your low voltage circuit originates. Obviously, if your transformer is controlled by some other ...


5

You want to trip the overcurrent detector (breaker) serving a GFCI outlet. No. Don't do it. What you're looking for is so similar to the other question that it really is a duplicate. It is wrong for all the reasons that one is wrong (and not insane in a certain industrial setting for the reasons I describe in my answer there). The presence of GFCI is ...


0

I suppose this answer more properly belongs on the linked question rather than here, but.. if you really want to trip the overcurrent breaker and not trip the GFCI outlet, then the only thing to do is introduce an overcurrent. A dead short as proposed by answers in that related question is indeed an overcurrent, but it's also rather extreme. The thing to ...


1

Honestly, the safest way (assuming this is a receptacle circuit) is to use a plug-in wiring tester with a GFCI test button. Plug in, push button, done. No safety issues or hassles. And you really should own one as an electrical DIYer anyways.


1

It depends. it sounds like each building gets its own 120v 20A circuit. As long as there's a ground wire run back to the panel, this sounds OK. 10 gauge is more than sufficient to combat the voltage drop. The catch here is what kind of cable are we talking? If this is UF cable, you're good. If it's NM cable, not so much (even if it's in conduit). Is it ...


0

Tripping a GFCI receptacle disconnects the hot power conductor at the receptacle. All GFCI receptacles have a TEST button which when pressed trips the GFCI receptacle. Tripping a GFCI breaker disconnects the hot power at the breaker (in the panel) for the entire circuit. There are devices called GFCI testers which when plugged into a GFCI protected circuit ...


1

The GFCI section will trip if any current leaves the hot wire without returning on the neutral wire. The circuit breaker will trip if more current leaves the hot wire than its trip rating, such as 15 or 20A. So, if you want to induce a trip on the breaker without tripping the GFCI outlet, you simply need to draw more current than the breaker's rating ...


3

Voltage drop is caused by the current you are actually pulling, not breaker trip rating. Many people compute voltage drop based on trip, but that's silly - if you're actually pulling breaker trip current, you've got other problems. And many people consider 3% a hard limit (a bit silly since the only number Code speaks of is 8%, but I think they are ...


1

The 10-2 with a 20AMP breaker is ok. The 10-2 could go to a 30 amp breaker but your standard outlets would limit that to the 20 AMP breaker. Just curious, are the runs in conduit or direct buried cable?


1

I am not so sure that the Common of the transformer connects to terminal TH of the ignition control module. It looks more like the TR terminal and it looks like another terminal is labeled TH. I would encourage you to locate the wire join point depicted below and add your C wire into the existing 3 wire join to make it a 4 wire connection. If you are lucky ...


1

Figure Out What You Have First The instructions below are based on a typical configuration. This is very likely to be the case if: The 2 Black/White cables are currently connected together Power is coming in on one (and if you disconnect them, only one, of the black wires). You need a tester to verify this before continuing. If these 3 cables are all ...


0

You probably have a supply line in, a traveler out to the switches, and two switch legs (red and black) coming back. This is an educated guess. You absolutely need to get an inexpensive tester and find out what is hot. Trying to install your fixture without it is dangerous.


1

If you want to wire in 50A for a future, larger RV, then you need to run the cabling with 6/3 UF cable (not NM/Romex, you cannot use Romex because you will be going outdoors). If you were to do that with e 6/3 cable, with the panel you have bought, that would be fine. However, it's a common case for someone to buy the wrong thing and then go into ...


1

No, you can't do that. The 10-2 romex has a 30 to 35 amp maximum depending on the insulation. The breaker in the main panel's job is to protect the 10-2 so it has to be a 30 AMP breaker, not the 50 AMP. If this is going to be a permanent type installation you need to think about running your cable in such a way that it's not a safety hazard or a code ...


2

Unless you are planning to do some patching and painting I am afraid you are stuck with a 4G box. If you want to remove the switch because its just irritating you can use a switch blank shown below: These can be found in most big box hardware stores and online. They come in different colors and can be found in decora style also. Good luck.


1

The short black wires are pigtails; their color can be disregarded. Ground is always color-coded green, yellow-green stripe, or bare. It goes to the metal chassis of the junction box and lamp, or any ground wires coming from the lamp (e.g. There should be one running down any chains). It never goes to anything else. The cluster of black wires goes to ...


6

These new smart switches are active devices, and power themselves between supply (their black) and neutral (their white obviously). Therefore they care about the difference between supply (their black) and switched/lamp power (their red). Your old switches didn't care about that. You need the smart-switch black (supply) to go to the bundle of black ...


1

I have never used lever connectors but AFIK the WAGO should work great. They are only approved for copper conductor (not aluminum). With the special WAGO joint compound they would probably work with aluminum. I think they do not accept wires over #12 so this would limit their use with aluminum. I have heard that there are counterfeit WAGO lever connectors ...


2

You need to reverse the line and load on the left switch


0

This is something your feeder could handle... A 6AWG aluminum feeder landed on 75°C lugs (such as those found in loadcenters and on circuit breakers) can handle 50A. If we apply the Table 220.55 calculations, starting with Note 4: Branch-Circuit Load. It shall be permissible to calculate the branch-circuit load for one range in accordance with ...


0

The 3-6 appears to be aluminum so its ratings (distance and ampacity per diameter) are lower than for copper wire/cable. When you attach the ends of Aluminum wire to new breakers or other terminals, use a wire brush to clean off oxidation or dirt and coat with an oxidation inhibitor sold for the purpose. Be sure your terminations at breakers or devices are ...


1

My first concern looking at the subpanel is if that bare #6AL is in fact a ground and the two appliances are straight 240V then the two white wires connect to the buss should have some green tape on them. If it's not a ground but actually a neutral, where are the grounds? You will need to ground everything. I would try utilizing the #6AL XHHW since ...


1

The metal Z-strap is the bonding link The N-G bonding link in your dryer is quite plainly visible in the second photo you posted; it's simply that your dryer used a metal Z-strap from the neutral screw on the terminal block to a nearby chassis grounding screw as the link, instead of using a wire with ring terminals on each end. So, to convert this dryer to ...


2

The middle nut on the terminal board is the neutral. You can see the two white wires connected to it. You and also see the jumper going from the neutral to the housing. If you're going to go to a four prong plug, you will need a four wire cable and plug. The black and red wires from the new cable will go to the two outside nuts, the white wire will go to the ...


2

Your plan as written probably doesn't follow code in a couple of places. If you're working with an electrician, you should have them approve your plan. Then you implement the plan, but they check your work. Don't do the work or buy materials until they have reviewed your plan. From a usability standpoint, don't put the ceiling lights on the same circuit as ...


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