New answers tagged

1

This may not be the ideal solution but I did get it connected an working. I did not realize that I could put more than one of the wires on a single screw on the switch. Once I figured this out, I simply connected the formerly backstabbed wires to their corresponding screws and doubling up on the screw that already had a wire on it. Thanks for the help, and ...


0

Make sure the black wire going in the backstab is connected to the backstab closest to the screw terminal with the black wire. I am assuming this is the case, but we can't tell for sure without a picture. Whoever wired this originally used a white wire for the hot pigtail. This small length of white wire connects from the wire nut with the black wires to ...


7

Use GFCI switches You seem to be assuming that the only kind of GFCI available is a receptacle. They actually come in several other arrangements: GFCI + breaker GFCI + switch + 1-socket recep GFCI deadfront (no sockets) useful for certain compliance issues GFCI that is a switch The last one looks like a GFCI dead front, but the Test/Reset buttons are ...


4

Hardwired Lights I have some plug-in ceiling lights. I don't particularly like them! One of them I finally switched - original was plug-in, so I replaced with a plug-in. It died early (cheap junk, but I didn't realize it at the time), I returned it to Home Depot and put the money towards a hardwired light. Not a big deal to remove the receptacles and hard ...


3

If you have hardwired fixtures, rather than plug-in lights, they do not need to be GFCI. Plug in lights require receptacles, and there's no telling what might get plugged into receptacles, so they have to be GFCI protected. If you insist on using plug in lights, they do need to be GFCI protected, and the GFCI should be "readily accessible" for ...


8

The requirements for GFCI protection are in NEC 210.8(a): 210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel. Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel shall be provided as required in 210.8(A) through (E). The ground-fault circuit interrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location. and (A) tells you that ...


2

I am a huge fan of using colored tape to re-color wires according to their actual function. Here, with black=always-hot and red=switched-hot. What to do next should be fairly straightforward.


1

Terminology a bit messed up, but in the end I think this is fairly normal. Let's call the three cables coming at top A, B, C. A and B - one of these is incoming power, one is power going out to another place - more lights in another room, more receptacles, etc. They are technically quite different, but for practical purposes they are treated the same here. ...


4

In my humble opinion, it isn't a good or safe idea to try and fix them. The bi-metal that controls the heat range of the burner is more than likely fatigued and can't be replaced. The switches are bracketed together in such a way that they are not meant to be taken apart and if you do, it's hard to get them securely put back together. Even if you could ...


1

You can add another to the connection of existing neutrals, you will likely need to change the yellow connectors on the neutral and ground with larger (red) connectors. Most yellow connectors are only NRTL Listed for 3@#12 or 4@#14. The existing switch should also have a connection to the grounds, you will need to make sure you connect to the ground of your ...


1

Yes, you can do this. You will need a double pole single throw switch. They are commonly available at your home stores..... be careful not to get a 4-way switch... they look almost identical.


1

If your original wiring schematic is correct black and white on the switch this is a switch loop, or switch leg! the power goes to the fixture. Then the hot comes back to the switch on the white it is not a neutral. at this point do not connect all whites together as someone said. The white “always hot” should be marked as a hot the black complete’s the ...


0

To make one switch the master switch, and always function one light: Connect power to the inlet side and the outlet side directly to the light. That light will always function with the master switch, regardless of the other switch position. To get power to the other switch, run wires from the outlet side of the master switch (can use the push slots, or wire ...


2

Steam wiring is not for this By "steam wiring" I mean all the doddy old-fashioned wiring we do with 1880-era SCADA tech (i.e. brains made of wire and nuts, snap switches, etc). What you want is smart switches in a hub system. So you have smart modules (or simply smart bulbs), and then smart switches in the locations of interest. At that point you ...


-1

Remember that the power comes in through the black wire into the circuit and the neutral returns the power to the source. The switch is just there to interrupt the circuit or complete it. In the illustration, the switch on the left does not complete the circuit; creating a neutral fault. FIX: Step1: Looking at the diagram, connect all the white wires ...


1

This seems to be a bit of an X-Y problem. Specifically, I suspect the issue isn't so much that "all 3 switches control L1" but rather "all 3 switch locations control L1". In which case: Box 1: S1a Box 2: S1b, S2a Box 3: S1c, S2b S1a, S1b, S1c are all one circuit. Two of these are 3-way switches and one is a 4-way switch. Assuming ...


0

So you'll have a single pole double throw switch controlling a ceiling fan in the up position and a switched outlet in the down position. This will work but keep in mind that when the ceiling fan is on and the outlet off, you're timer in the outlet will lose it's setting. You'll also need that outlet to be GFCI protected. You might consider a switch with the ...


1

Given the wire topology you have there, it ain't gonna happen. There is no way to protect another recep with only 3 wires coming into the box. You need a minimum of 4: unprotected supply Hot and Neutral, and protected-zone Hot and Neutral. You can install that GFCI+recep+switch combo, but you won't be able to use the LOAD terminals for anything, and the ...


0

Forget the magazines. A Pro and a high-class DIYer would go to the electrical code books in force in your jurisdiction they will explain in exhausting detail how to wire something like that. In most jurisdictions it is legal for a homeowner to do their own wiring as long as they get it inspected when they are done. A call to your building inspection ...


2

To add to DoxyLover's accurate description, I advise to get colored tape and label wires by their function. I recommend yellow for the 2 travelers and red for the switched-hot. Like this, except move the light to the left and the left 3-way to the middle. Code has a few requirements about the use of the white wire. If you wire the 3-way spur so it's ...


1

What you currently have is most likely two switch loops. On both sides, the power is first arriving at the load (outlets or lights), hot, neutral and ground. The hot is spliced to the black wire going to the switch. The white to the switch is the "switched hot", returning from the switch to the load. Technically, the "switched hot" white ...


2

I hooked up the 4 wires in the same position That's your problem right there. Common blunder with 3/4 way switches. Manufacturers completely randomize screw positions on the switches. Every switch is different. You cannot rely on positions at all. You must use screw colors. Fortunately, this is not too bad to clean up: simply group your 4 wires by the ...


1

Are you testing the receptacle on the top half? The end the red wire goes to of the receptacle? It looks like you have it wired correctly the bottom receptacle will be always hot (the end with the 3 blacks) and the top will be controlled by the switch. That is how you have it wired and that part of it is hot all the time I believe you are checking the wrong ...


0

I would open up the two other switch boxes and take a look at what is going on. Then try to figure out if the switch powers the light or the line goes to the lights and then to the switch. Then check for voltage at various points. If you still can not solve the problem, put every thing back the way it was and check for voltage at various points and compare ...


2

Looks GOOD! you've got the neutral stubbed off at the switch (for future upgrade to smart switch) you've got switched hot to all the outlets and neutral connected to each the red black color switch is a bit confusing but works you will also need your ground to each of them IF this is outdoors, the first outlet in the chain should be a GFCI outlet in which ...


0

A hot white wire is normally part of a switch loop. The white being always hot keeps it from being confused as a neutral. After you read this entire answer If you connect the black and white on that cable it will probably activate a light or garbage disposal or another device in a kitchen. Please read the last sentence prior to trying this. I hope you have ...


5

My bet: you have turned off Off-While-Occupied Lutron occupancy sensors have what's called an Off While Occupied mode, as described in Lutron's advanced programming guide. With this mode enabled, turning the lights off manually with the tapswitch while you are in the controlled space causes the sensor to keep them off as long as it detects occupancy. ...


1

From your description, it sounds like the green wire is live, the black wire is connected to the entry light and the red wire is connected to the patio light. There is no ground or neutral coming to the box. The EJ351 timer switch is specifically advertised as not requiring a neutral connection. Try turning on either light and then measuring the voltage on ...


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