New answers tagged

0

If you want to wire in the switch you've got you need to replace that two conductor romex with a 3 conductor one (3 insulated conductors plus earth) Your supply connection (the short black wire from the wire nut) goes to the side of the switch where the terminals are linked by a brass fin the red and black to the fant-light go to the other side of the switch....


0

Try replacing the switch, it sounds very much like the one you have isn't working correctly.


0

You don't have enough wires for a double switch You don't have enough wires in the wall for a double switch, unfortunately. You'd need a /3 cable (black, red, white, bare) for that, but you only have a /2 cable (black, white, bare), and all the wires in that cable are already spoken for. Maestro to the rescue! However, Lutron makes a solution for this ...


2

Yes, you can run just about any length needed between the generator power inlet mounted on the side of your home to the transfer switch. Of course the wire / cable will need to be sized right for the generator and distance. Always a good idea to upsize the wiring in case you decided to go with a larger generator later. Like @Harper-ReinstateMonica said, ...


0

If you had more space than a light switch box would provide has you could use a relay to separate the smart switch from the circuit powering the light. If you don't mind adding a decently large electrical box you can still do it. Then the configuration would be, bottom cable powers the switch and it outputs a switched live. That switched live and neutral ...


2

Can’t do it. There’s a “Great Wall of China” between the left switch (and its cables) and the right switch. You cannot cross that with any wire, except safety ground. It’s a Code violation, it’s a safety hazard to workmen working on the left circuit... and what’s more, if there are any GFCIs or AFCIs in either circuit, it will trip them. What you might be ...


1

It does seem like the center top cable in your diagram supplies the light fixture, and that the cable at switch 2 is a loop. If that's the case there's no way to reconfigure connections and maintain switching at switch 2 without adding a conductor.


1

This isn't a hard situation. My preferred approach would be to run power into the first switch 3-way box and 12/3 or 14/3 with ground from that one to the other 3-way switch. Then run the switched cable to both ceiling boxes. That takes care of the switched outlets. Then run a 12/2 or 14/2 with grnd to the ceiling outlet boxes from the first 3-way switch box ...


3

Not with the outlet on a spur with 12/2. Worse, you cannot simply bypass the switch, unless there’s another light in the room under control of a switch. Code requires every room must have a light switch in the usual location, and the switch must either operate a light, or a socket.


2

You would need some 12/3 going from the switch to the outlet. You would need the neutral, which you have; you would need the switched hot, which you have but what you don't have is the always hot. that where the third wire comes in. Are there any other wires in the outlet box?


1

It looks like the white wire may be a neutral. This is good. However, it looks like the switch is a 4 way switch (though I always though 3 way switches were used at the top of the stairs). This is less good -- there's no consistent hot leg on it. You can verify both of these with a multimeter. So I don't think this box is going to help you much, as you need ...


0

I used an Edison bulb light socket adapter (one example here: https://www.leviton.com/en/products/1403-i), and simply plugged the camera in below the bulb. The wire was neatly attached to the wall with u-clips, and the excess was coiled around the camera. Total cost was quite low, and required zero wiring.


1

Copied from my comment as an answer: I took off the working closet light and it is a black/white wire going to the fixture. I traced this wire back to the ceiling box and the black wire goes to #4, white goes to #1. Red wire in #1 is always hot, black wires in #4 are hot when the light is on. Wired my fixture the same as the wire to the closet light - black ...


7

I would not worry about adding a “wire” to the switch either the box grounded those nice bright brass yokes being connected to the metal box will be more than enough grounding (in the US it is code compliant to use this same method with some devices). Your switches look to be in exceptional condition I hope the contacts are also if so they may last another ...


3

The 2 blacks From the switch go to the red and orange. Doesn’t matter clip the reds straighten and use a wire nut to combine the 3 wires. Then black to orange with a wire nut. The white on the switch goes to that group of whites If you have a white on the switch, last the green to the ground or bare copper. That it was a 3 way doesn’t matter if the other ...


0

Why not just go and buy some new ones. You will get the look you want and might be safer.


0

If you want a Wyze cam there, and there's no power (won't be from just a light switch), you could get the new Wyze outdoor cam that's battery powered. (Obviously won't help if you absolutely, simply must use an existing wired Wyze cam.)


3

Use switch cleaner spray to clean any gunk away, then use a silicon grease with a small craft paint brush.


2

If all you want to do is disconnect the switch A and put a blank in it's place then remove the wires from the switch and connect the yellow wire to either orange, and cap off the extra orange. If that makes switch B upside down then swap the oranges at switch A location. If you intend on eliminating the junction box for switch B or eliminating the conduit ...


2

Turn off all power before starting any work. OK switch B can remain in place but you have to determine which of the two orange travelers is hot when switch B is in the top (ON) position, then disconnect and tape the other orange wire. Remove switch A and wire nut the yellow wire to the hot orange that you did not disconnect from the other switch. Tape the ...


-1

There is a type of dry lubricant that is easily accessible and can lubricate your switch. A pencil (aka Graphite). You generously write over the area where you need lubricated, use the switch a few times, and keep doing it until it starts working again. The graphite works great as a lubricate and doesn't "leak" everywhere. Graphite does conduct ...


7

I would spray it with contact cleaner. And then cycle the switch several times. That should clean out any gunk interfering with the operation.


2

I wouldn't. Most oils are flammable. Those that are not are usually toxic. Substances that are used to improve contacts don't generally deal with interrupting contacts. Expect soot buildup. Any (organic) liquid may degrade the primitive plastic of the buttons. And finally, you have a better course of action: Disassemble it and see where the moving parts have ...


8

I would use dielectric grease, which is widely available at auto parts stores. Apply to blades, contact points and pivot points with a toothpick, bamboo skewer or other applicator. Work the mechanism a few times and apply a little more. Power off, of course.


13

Oil, no. Lubricate, yes. Common oils have multiple problems for electrical devices, the worst of which is possible flammability. You can get specific electrical "contact lubricant" for this though. It is usually not sold in hardware stores, you may have to order it on-line and the smallest package will be a lot more than you need, but don't ...


1

This is the typical way to connect a switch. The 2 blacks connected are "power in, power out" to the next switch in the circuit. The pig-tail to the dimmer connected to the two blacks is also typical. Most inspectors (and I believe the code as well) require rough in to be completed to the extent that the box is "ready to receive the device&...


1

That thing there is called a pigtail You probably know that your house has many more “points of use” (places electricity is used) than it has circuit breakers. How does this work? Power (in a cable containing hot and neutral) are brought to a point-of-use (technically that’s called an “outlet” even if it’s a light/switch)... then hot+neutral are continued ...


1

The additional black wire is probably continuing the hot to another outlet or light switch. If you were to disconnect the black wires that are connected together from the wall, you'd find that only one has power. If you were to leave the other wire disconnected, you'd find that other outlets and/or switches would stop working. Just go ahead and connect the ...


0

In the beginning wireless ceiling fan controls were simple things consisting of little more than a box of relays (or triacs, or whatever other kind of electrically controlled switch). They were grafted onto an ordinary non-remote-controlled unit either at the factory or as an aftermarket kit. It was easy to add or remove the remote control option. Now it's ...


1

Replacing the dimmer switch (whichever kind it may have been) with a normal switch fixed the problem. Mentioning this in case anyone with this issue with their smart lights stumble on this.


0

Since you're running a new cable to a fan ceiling box that you will install you're going to have to source your power from the receptacle box since there isn't a neutral in the switch box. It probably doesn't make sense to have your wall switch activate both the fan and the outlet so I'll assume you want the switch to power the fan. You will then have ...


1

You run a cable from the ceiling to either the switch or the receptacle. You then need to change the connections in the outlet, and if you route to the switch you will need to change those terminations too. If you route to the switch you will lose the switched receptacle. There are so many actual ways to make the terminations at the receptacle that you would ...


3

Per the commented suggestion from @DaveM, there are rubber shims/spacers that can be used for worn out, abused, maligned, damaged, or non-flush electrical outlets where getting the electrical switches to pull flush and level upon tightening isn't possible. I used the following pack from Lowe's which was less then $10: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Gardner-Bender-...


1

You only need a SPST switch. Just connect it across brown and red keeping all connections how they are.


0

Loosen the screws that attach the switches to the box, and use the cover plate screws to "pull" the switches into alignment against the back of the cover plate as they are tightened. This will only work (reiterating FreeMan's answer) if the switches are not bound up by the way that the wires are packed into the box and if the wires are not pushing ...


0

What I've found, when I have switches that are twisted like that is that I've done a poor job of packing the wiring behind the switches and into the box. After turning off the power at the breaker pull the switches back out of the wall just enough to see behind them. Have a look at where the wiring is behind them and rearrange just a bit - based on what I ...


4

OK, Those tabs are not up against the drywall. Press the switches in hard until the tabs are against the drywall and then tighten the screws. Then get a two gang switch cover with the four screws that will aid in getting the switches lined up correctly. You can loosen the screws holding the switches to the box a bit if it helps line them up with the new ...


1

There are not too many whites! All those whites have a job. They are "working for a living". You do need to add your switch's neutral wire to that bundle. Do so competently. All the whites must still be connected to each other when you are done! The red wires are probably the other half of a multi-wire branch circuit. This is a serious ...


0

The white wire is the neutral and is never switched. I do not see a ground wire, so the conduit may be grounded. Check the voltage between the box and the black wire it should be 120 volts. Voltage between the black (hot) and the incoming white wire should be 120 volts. Attach a ground screw to the screw hole in the box and run a (green or bare) wire from ...


2

In 1988 switches still didn't require ground screws. Safety protocols have ratcheted up since, and switches installed today do. Someone may have replaced that switch and not bothered to connect it, or it just wasn't used initially to save time. If you like, add a pigtail. As Jim Stewart says, "Each switch must be grounded. This could be done with separate ...


1

Some wires need to be marked here (on both ends) The white wire that is with the blacks is not a neutral. It has been assigned to be a hot, and as Code requires, it's being used for the "always-hot". As such, Code also requires it be marked with colored tape, paint or shrinktube, and I recommend black. Like any marking, it should be done on both ends. ...


0

You are correct Breaking the hot-side tab on the receptacle and then running a pigtail from the current junction of black and white wires to the screw you labeled "12" on your diagram will indeed make your receptacle a half-switched receptacle. Don't forget to mark the white wire connected to that junction as a hot wire with some black electrical tape or ...


3

You need 2 x 2-gang 2-way and 1 x 1-gang 2-way A faceplate with two switches on is two-gang. Note that 1-gang 1-way switches are also available, slightly cheaper; this will not work in your application. Switches that can be wired to operate from two locations is a 2-way. (This is UK terminology. USA terminology is different.) http://wiki.diyfaq.org....


1

The short answer to the question is yes, two LiftMaster 882LMW door openers can be wired in parallel and work. Please note that you cannot simply place a doorbell switch or any dry contact in parallel and expect this to work. The long answer is that the 12Vdc coming from the garage opener itself is not just a DC voltage; there is a variable frequency PWM ...


0

I would hesitate to give a definitive answer to this because it's obvious in your circuit that when S1 is ON and S2 is OFF then you are connecting mains to the output of Sonoff 1 with no connection to it's input. However, I have checked my own Sonoff (Basic R2) and the input line is switched to the output by a mechanical relay with no other connection to ...


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