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You can transition wiring methods at a junction box. Use the EMT wiring method up to the junction box (whole nine yards with fittings and clamps). Then use the NM wiring method beyond it. The junction box must remain accessible without screws, nails or demolition (other than the ones on the junction box lid, of course). If you don't like the aesthetics ...


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The advice to keep the EMT is good and makes sense, but I can think of a factor that might motivate its removal. If the EMT is surface mounted in the attic then it'll be in the way of any kind of wall finishing you might be planning for the future. It would make a lot of sense that you'd want to convert to NM cables installed inside the wood framing. The ...


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I agree with the comments suggesting that you keep the conduit, but in general you'd do the conversion at a junction box. If there's a conveniently-located outlet, do it there to avoid having a blank box plate forever. (All junctions need to remain accessible.) Just bring your conduit into a suitable box and convert to cable with wire nuts of the ...


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You have two sets of wires to extend. The solar panel wires, I assume you will want to have the cable exit at the door end of the container, so you don't have a potentially leaky hole in the side. (NEVER put a hole in the roof). That needs 2 wires. The switch wires. The switch has 3 modes: Off, always-on, and motion sensor. Off needs no wires, but the ...


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The fact that you have to toggle the switch to get it going again leads me to believe you've got a bad switch or maybe it's wired by utilizing the backstabs. Try switching the light and fan switch to see if the problem "moves" to the lights or stays with the fan. Don't disconnect anything until you've taken a few pictures for reference. Also, turn off the ...


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Get a different sensor (or replace the wiring in the wall) You have an old-style switch loop, where the black wire is the hot, the white wire is the switched hot, and the bare wire is ground, of course. Notice what's missing from this description? Neutral, that's what! This is because a mechanical light switch has no use for a neutral wire; however, your ...


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The wiring in your wall is called a "traditional switch loop". The two wires present (besides ground) are always-hot (we hope, the white) and switched-hot (we hope, the black). Note that neutral is NOT present in this box. This is a case of white being used as a hot wire because the cable only has 2 conductors. Modern Code requires a re-tasked white wire ...


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Neutral Required Many (not all) smart switches, timers, motion sensors, etc. require a neutral. That is because they need to get power even when the switched device is off. Some older switches were designed to leak power through the device even when "off", but that does not work well with LED lights, so needing a neutral at the switch has become more common ...


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If you mean a lower wattage bulb this would not cause any problems, the fixture wiring may have shorted out tripping the breaker, or causing a wiring failure at a backstab splice. More information is needed to try and help. But a dimmer bulb would not be the cause unless the bulb itself had an internal short causing the breaker to trip or a wiring failure.


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Yes, that's what "on" means. It means the air handler will keep operating, even though nothing is heating or cooling the air. Whether this is a good idea depends on how your system is setup and what is going on. If you are getting thermal separation ceiling to floor or upstairs to downstairs or sunny to shady side, it can be helpful at evening things ...


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Yes. the fan will stay on until you switch it to a different setting. Even with the compressor "off" the fan will continue to run.


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At first glance, it seems like the switch is putting out-of-phase power onto the neutral terminal of the 110v outlet. The only reason I can imagine someone doing this is as an attempt to turn an outlet into a switchable 110v/220v outlet, possibly originally intended for the 220v outlet (I'm not familiar with European appliances, maybe some are supposed to ...


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A much better plan would be to install a subpanel near the service panel. Then, move the circuits you want to shut off to this new subpanel. At that point, you have two ways to solve it: First, the individual breakers in the new subpanel could be SWD. Second, you could shut the feed breaker off to the subpanel. Depending on the subpanel, you could ...


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The problem is ordinary switches only switch hot, but with a second source you need to switch neutral to go to that source as well. One possible fix is to wire up a separate inlet outside wired to one receptacle inside and move the microwave plug between the "main" receptacle and this new dedicated secondary supply when needed.


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If you find out that the yellow cable is hot and switched only by a breaker, you can feed the light from it. Just disconnect the existing light and switch wire from the hot and neutral at the light fixture box. Cap them and tuck them away. Remove any black tape from the switch white wire and connect it to the white wire from the light fixture. Connect the ...


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One of the wires between the 4 way and the 3 way is not passing electricity probably because one of the switches is not making the correct connection to it swap the the two wires from the 4way at the 3 way end, if the problem changes (3 way needs to be "off") it's the 4-way that's bad, if it stays the same the 3 way is bad.


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Don't replace the other two switches. You'll only muddy the water, in fact, I would rollback to the earlier 3-way. The root problem is that previously, someone replaced the 3-way switch and they did a bodge job of it. A 3-way switch is supposed to have 2 traveler terminals, going to 2 traveler wires, and a common going either from supply or onward to ...


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One of those switches has to be a 4-way switch for things to work correctly.


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Switches do go bad so yes, just change the other two, Since you already changed a 3-way, you'll need another 3-way and a 4-way... yes, a 4-way. Do yourself a favor and take pictures of the wiring before unhooking anything. Also, when replacing the switches, hook the wire around the screws on the switches, do not use the back stabs. Remember to shut off the ...


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The gap you are seeing is well within the normal limits of adjustment for standard yokes (the metal thing the screws go through). You just tightened down the yoke screws and let them land where they may. You'll need to back them off, shift the outlet and switch around as needed, and repeatedly try the plate until it lines up. If the yokes don't give ...


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