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5

Don't waste your time. Have a /3 cable bypass the lamps. This is a rather straightforward problem if you aren't trying to snake the travelers through the bulb sockets. I know you imagine some great cost savings in wire by doing that... forget it. Besides... running travelers through the bulb sockets is pointless, and takes up a LOT of splice space inside ...


2

Normally Black is the hot supply or L, the white is the neutral N both from the supply and to the load the red wire is the switched hot. This is how all the motion sensors work that I have installed. But you don’t show which wire is red but this is the most common. Most electricians use Red as a switched hot but it is not a requirement to do so.


2

Common is the black screw. Travelers are the brass screws. And position does not matter at all on a 3-way switch. You can buy 6 different brands of 3-way switch out of the bins at Home Depot and find 6 different positionings of those screws. 3-way switches have 3 screws + ground A switch with 4 screws + ground is the wrong switch. If it is a "4-way ...


1

Leviton is a manufacturer. They make all kinds of electrical equipment, including both simple and smart switches. If you are installing a smart switch of any type (timer, WiFi, remote, etc.) then we'll need to know the model # and possibly additional specifics to get this figured out. But assuming it is a simple 3-way switch replacing the existing switch, ...


1

A simple and reliable means to your objective might be magnetic reed switches. A magnet placed on any portion of the moving structure can be used to open and close as the lights rotate. The circuit for one direction of travel would have the reed switch set to open as the magnet reaches the end of that direction, while the polarity switching circuit receives ...


1

I don’t know if you ever got a proper answer. Yes putting 2 20 amp breakers on a 30 amp service is fine. You will trip the 30 amp main if you draw more than 30 for any length of time. We over subscribe breaker panels all the time you should plan on your peak load being 80% by code but you can have more total breakers than the service rating.


2

Lighted switches, as with many other devices (smart switches, timers, motion detectors, etc.) need to get power for something else - i.e., they don't just need power for the light. There are a few ways of doing that: Batteries - This is incredibly simple but means changing batteries periodically and doesn't work well for a lighted switch because it would ...


1

I agree with Ecnerwal’s comment. The element may ohm out good. 6-12 ohms or whatever the value but have a path to ground that you cannot see with a common ohm meter. In this case we would check the element hot to ground using a megger. A megger is a high voltage ohm meter I would be checking a heating element at at least 1000v. I would double check the ...


2

t's the slot in the head of the plate screw that makes unscrewing the screws a hassle! I always curse slot headed screws when I encounter them! The trick to use that makes the screws unscrew with no problems is to clean out the slot of the screw head. Using a utility knife slice through the dried paint that is clogging the slot. It may take a couple of ...


4

This is a code violation. But there are real specific reasons (i.e., not just to have all switches look the same). A specific why this is bad: With the neutral switched instead of hot, if you turn off the switch to change a light bulb, you still have a hot socket. Since ground is present (neutral is effectively ignored since that has been switched off), you ...


1

Some folks should read the site rules prior to down voting this is a really good question. Yes your lights work but in switching the neutral you have created a hazardous condition where the light fixture is always live. Yes you stop current flow or turn off. Not only is this hazardous where you could get shocked with the circuit turned off it is a code ...


1

Your switch is wired up wrong The RPLS530 does not require neutral, according to its instructions; however, yours appears to be incorrectly wired. According to the instructions, C and 2 need to be connected to the incoming hot in a single-pole setup like yours, while 1 connects to the switched-hot off to the fixture. I would expect the switch to function ...


0

You can't pull from the microwave circuit under Code, so use the range hood circuit instead Your 1700W microwave is far in excess of the 50% limit set by NEC 210.23(B)(2) on the total wattage of fixed appliances connected to branch circuits that also have lighting and/or general-use receptacles on them: (2) Utilization Equipment Fastened in Place. The total ...


3

You need to remove the tab between the brass screws on the outlet. This will separate the two hot feeds.


31

TL;DR Remove the tab on the hot (red/black) side "A/B" plus the symptoms sounds like you have a Multi Wire Branch Circuit or MWBC. With an MWBC, you can have the top receptacle's hot on one part of the circuit and the bottom receptacle's hot on the other part of the circuit. Each receptacle is then 120V hot-to-neutral but the two hots are 240V ...


1

I'll give this a shot as well - In my first comment above (and everyone else's); we point out that what you are calling things, what we see in the single picture posted, and how lights work regardless of what you are calling them and the wires in the picture don't add up. The simplest and safest advice for everyone and certainly yourself and anyone living in ...


2

Note: This is a fair ways short of being a complete answer, for obvious reasons. I'll make it community wiki, or feel free to write a different answer if enough information comes forth to do that. "Everything is back the way it was from what I documented. As I stated: The left switch (double pole used as a single pole) has two black wires and ground ...


1

All things being equal (meaning, any wire and switches are rated for the voltage and current they will be carrying) you'll typically experience fewer losses and longer component life if the control is done at the line voltage side, instead of the lower voltage side. Power loss due to resistance in a wire is proportional to the current squared (Ohm's law, P = ...


5

Based on your details on what you did with the replacement outlet, I'd say you didn't remove the metal tab on the outlet connecting the two brass, power, screws. Doing this allows the two outlets to be split between always hot and switched hot. The one wire you "punched" into the backstab should be pigtailed so you don't use the backstab. they are ...


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