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Call the electrical utility and explain the issue. You may have an eroding lug in your meter/meter panel, main service panel, or in a junction box outside (if your lines are underground). Any compromised junction of either one of your mains (assuming you have 220v service coming in) will cause flickering and eventually the power will go out entirely.


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You could be dealing with 1/2 switched receptacles. 1 part of the receptacle is controlled by a wall switch that will allow table lamps and etc to controlled by that wall switch. My whole house is wired that way. Half the receptacle is wired always hot and the other is controlled by a switch. Check it out.


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In the absence of any other answers I'll put what I'm thinking currently. Please tell me in the comments why this will cause my house to burn down (and also vote me down while you're at it). Or even better, help me improve the answer or give a better solution that actually works :) My idea The second gang goes to a light socket that is not in use. I presume ...


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You've identified the mains supply wires feeding the transformer's primary -- the black and the white wires marked L1 and L2 (the latter is actually better labeled neutral). The label on the transformer is visible (PRI 120V). The two transformer secondary wires aren't visible in the photo. They are two of the three wires that need to go to the thermostat. ...


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A church is a commercial facility so use caution on advice received on this site most are not familiar with the unique requirements to commercial construction. Could you provide a photo of the wires entering the box? Also how many lights and the type? there may be a contactor controlling multiple runs I use 3 phase contactors to control 3ea 20 amp strings on ...


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You can't run a neutral from the panel to the switch; code requires that the conductors of the circuit all must run together. So if you're going to run a neutral, you'll want to run it from the light to the switch. Some electronic switches, like timers, operate without a neutral, using the safety ground for the return current for the electronic controls. ...


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Retrofitting a cable with a neutral wire may be far more expensive than a different solution that does not require rewiring the building - unless by chance you have conduit for the wiring? If you do have conduit, it's a simple retrofit and you'd only need to get the neutral to the switch location - the lights already connect to neutral somewhere else. The ...


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AFCI's do have GFCI-like characteristics, because most of them include a "mini-GFCI" for detecting hot-ground and neutral-ground arc faults. That means you must handle their neutrals like a GFCI. (certain GE breakers are an exception). However, an AFCI will only trip due to neutral or ground mishandling downline of the AFCI. You need not search ...


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