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2

There is no difference between plug-on neutral and regular panels; plug-on-neutral is just an alternate way to pick up the neutral instead of a pigtail. As such it has no bearing on the question of neutral-ground bonding. Main panels must be bonded; subpanels must not. Also, you are not required to use the provided bonding screw, and you can run a heavy ...


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With GFCI’s being required in all garage receptacles I have used PON panels for subs it just makes sense. remove the bonding screw For a sub (plug on neutral) are a bit faster to wire and our inspectors like them so inspections go quicker. You can use old style breakers in a pon but pon will not fit in a old style panel.


3

On a main panel, you always bond the neutral and ground. Just because it's a PON panel doesn't change that. The reason they don't have it "factory bonded" is because sometimes they get used as a sub-panel. This is becoming the case more often. If the panel is covered by a separate disconnect, which is becoming required, then the main panel gets ...


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Yes, this appears to be doable, but the parts required aren't quite standard The good news is that this actually appears to be possible using inexpensive, readily obtainable parts; the only bad news is that it requires using them in a way that's technically off-label, but not in violation of the applicable listing requirements or product standard. In ...


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The root problem is you are modifying an appliance that is UL-listed, thus, voiding the UL listing. And further, you create a situation that Code really does not like, where a procedure is essential to safety. Code wants interlocks to be mechanical. Assuming this thing has an internal GFCI to keep you honest, the problem is on the other side: when you've ...


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The bars on the sides of the panel are both neutral bars connected by the insulated strap that runs under the busing. No ground wires should be connected to those bars, no screws, bonding wires, or straps should connect these two bars to the metal can. The pictures are too grainy to see if the grounds are terminated correctly, bonding to the can for years ...


3

The bigger problem is multi-wire branch circuits Looking at the subpanel, I see 32 "circuits" in use, and I only count 15 neutrals. And pretty much every other hot wire is red. This is, without a doubt, a multi-wire branch circuit or MWBC. Now, these are not a defect if done properly - but they are very vulnerable to being done wrong, and that's when ...


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