The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

New answers tagged

1

"Does this imply the carriage bolts and blocking is enough to ensure structural integrity of the joist framing?" From what you show in the illustrations, yes. The installation of the carriage bolts & blocking ensure the structural integrity, and, if you install them carefully, replace the function of the framing angle bracket.


2

You can do this it takes a simple bushing or clamp from the main panel. Since the cable is breaker protected as long as it is protected going out of the panel and into the new one it is code compliant. Well if you have a permit,


2

In passing: When things go wrong they go very wrong. Consider the following scenario: Window well pump ingests a bundle of leaves, and clogs. Water rises. Water gets above the lower plug. GFCI trips. Water continues to rise. Now it covers the live screws of the GFCI Depending how clean the water is you may not have enough current to trip the ...


2

You can't split wiring across cables like that All of the current-carrying conductors in any wire need to have their currents algebraically sum to 0, or in other words, from the viewpoint of any given cable exit, current out needs to equal current in. As a result, using one cable to carry hot + neutral and the others to carry only switched hots won't work, ...


3

Nope, you can't loop power out one cable and back the other. The rule is that currents must sum up to zero (be equal and opposite) amongst all wires in each cable or conduit. That means your idea of 3 cables - one for hot+neutral and two more for four switched lines - is a non-starter. You would need ONE cable that is /6. Or alternately, conduit and ...


3

The answer to your question is "quite critical": Grounds must be green, yellow/green or bare. Neutrals must be white or gray. All others are hot. Binding stranded wire to a screw terminal is tricky. Not impossible but tricky. I like to "super-twist it" by gripping the wire in a hole intended to shear off bolts, which keeps it circular. You have to ...


10

Meet grandfathering: the idea that if it was legal at the time it was built or renovated, it's still legal. However, fitting ungrounded 3-prong outlets were not legal in 1965. What else could it be? It is legal to fit a GFCI (Europe: RCD) device. Circuits are typically wired in strings, and a GFCI device can provide GFCI protection to downline points of ...


1

required- yes when building a new building or remodeling to the extent that would/should need a bldg inspection going off a given NEC version: 2008/11/14/17. a bldg built & wired to code with a bldg inspection & permit verifying that way back when, that now has a broken wire is not a violation. is an ungrounded outlet dangerous... matter of debate.....


5

In general, there's no requirement to bring buildings up to spec once the standard changes. If you have a 40's era apartment building, you don't need to run ground wires. However, installing grounded outlets without actually grounding them isn't a thing you're allowed to do. What I'd check is the age of the building. Most real estate websites know that ...


4

Only your AHJ can tell you, and you need to see him anyway to pull permits. The advice of the Home Depot clerk is 100% unreliable. Managers of real electrical supply houses shop Home Depot for potential employees, and they hire away anyone who knows anything, which leaves the ignorant. The advice of the electrician is probably valid if he was clear ...


5

If you went to a Home Depot very close to your house (in the same town) and they said that BX is required, I would take that seriously and research the finer points of that rule. A lot of the workers at home stores are not experts by any stretch, but they know what sells and what they have to stock, so there will be some truth to what they "know". That ...


Top 50 recent answers are included