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1

There may be (or have been in the past) rules or conventions about the F&E tank especially on solid fuel systems, to ensure they can't accidentally run dry. However in the past some F&E tanks for gas central heating were installed without any cold supply at all, were initially topped up with a jug, and then left to get on with it. It was assumed ...


0

I just passed the electrical inspection for the 220V outlet and wiring. Thank you all for the directions and assistance! Jim


1

I am going to point out that I do not approve the additional layer of drywall for ceiling. I just answered a question here - Should I use 1/4" drywall to cover ceiling texture or imperfections? - that addresses my concerns with an extra layer of drywall on ceilings. I love doubleing up drywalls on wall (vs furring out) so I am definitely "liberal" ...


1

Yes, both sets of screws are required. Two layers of gypsum board is generally used for two hour fire wall protection. The protection (and rating) comes from the proper installation, including proper nailing for both layers. If a fire develops and causes the top layer to fall, then the second layer would not have approved fastening to develop the two hour ...


5

There needs to be a connector there, tying all the ground wires together Some electricians get into the lazy habit of simply twisting ground wires together and leaving them that way, with no wirenut, dead-end compression joint, or solder to hold them together. Unfortunately, this does not produce a solid electrical connection, as there are only a few ...


6

It's not a legal method now to not use a Listed connector, I don't know if it was ever technically legal, but the the NW US that was common practice back in that era. Wire connectors have specific combinations that are Listed for it's use, but the normal colors represent trade norms. A yellow would be too small, a red would be fine, a tan which is between ...


4

There's a weird little ... glitch ... in Code that I don't know what to make of. Except such exceptions rarely make it in by mistake, and certainly don't survive two editions by mistake. The glitch says this: Neutral wires must be naturally white* their entire length, even in concealed parts of a cable. And if ground wires are green** insulated, then ...


1

Mine have always had plugs, if you want to hard wire it use flex , I us liquid tight flex all the time depending on what it is for I may use non metallic liquid tight , most of my systems take a beating and metallic holds up better especially in cold conditions. But this is an option.


0

See the attached diagram. It doesn't sound that you can meet these requirements.


2

Nope, you have to extend a 20A circuit with 12 AWG wire. The logic that "these will be lightly used receptacles" doesn't buy you a thing, because the safety of the wiring can't depend on how you use it. You are allowed to put NEMA 5-15 (common receptacles) on 20A circuits, due to a special exception. Even in the industrial parts of the Code, in the ...


1

No, you do not want to run a 20 amp circuit through 14/2 cable. Even with light usage it is clearly dangerous and against code. If someone later runs a heavier load on it it could cause serious problems. Why would you want to do that anyway? Wire it with 12 gauge per code so it'll be safe. There's no downside to running the proper cable.


1

Your concept is correct - you can daisy-chain any number of subpanels off a feeder breaker, with no additional breakers, as long as the wire and panels can handle the feed breaker ampacity. However, your plan to attach 2 wires to 1 lug is not acceptable. You can never do that, unless the labeling/instructions for that lug specifically tell you it's OK. ...


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