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2

I use Double Bubble Reflective Foil Insulation cut it to size as the vent cover , place over the hole and place the cover on top.. you can barely see it . No COLD AIR. And it’s reusable..YAS


1

Dryers have to vent outside, because if you fail to attach a vent, it will create extreme humidity in the living space, to the point where condensation is assured. The condensation will then cause mold and greatly accelerate rotting and rusting of wood and other building materials. This isn't a "maybe" - it definitely will happen. The condensing ...


2

The IRC (International Residential Code, section M1502) requires venting a dryer to the outside, and did so as far back as 1997 (the oldest reference I have access to), but most likely farther back than that. However, you CAN use what's called a ventless "condensing" dryer if it is specifically UL listed as such and if there is no access to an ...


12

Yes, the national electric code allows wiring in structures like your shed. If you plan on using UF wire for the run buried 24” deep you need to bring the wire up in conduit so the wire is protected. If you run conduit, the conduit only has to be buried 18” for PVC. If you run rigid or intermediate metal it can be buried 6”. Burial depths are listed in the ...


11

It is advisable to use a slip joint [expansion coupling] on the conduit stub up, otherwise nothing out of the ordinary. Around here, that's not out of the ordinary even with a poured foundation. Assuming PVC conduit, 18" cover to the top of the conduit, minimum. Warning tape above. Stub-ups (what sticks out of the ground) need to be schedule 80, and it'...


0

You move the hot supplying the receptacle from the downstream connection FROM the switch to the upstream connection SUPPLYING the switch. However the word "bathroom" should be a huge red flag here. Do NOT touch a bathroom wiring project involving an outlet unless your intent is to replace said outlet with a GFI. They do make GFI's with an outlet ...


1

Based on further research, the answer I have come up with is "maybe". But probably not. Maybe, based on the whim of the plumbing inspector. Maybe, based on whether gases trapped in the upper section of the overhead vent is a problem. Probably will technically work as a vent, based on the physics of the system. However, that's too many maybes, so I'...


1

I called a local engineer and he said that it was sufficient to fill the hole with epoxy putty. I mentioned screwing in some straps around the hole and he said that’s great but not necessary in this case.


5

Better idea: use a part listed for the job to bypass the errant current around the lights Fortunately, there's a way to bypass the errant "phantom" current (from capacitive coupling through the parallel traveler wires) back to neutral without doing anything that'd void your insurance. Simply nut a Lutron LUT-MLC in between switched-hot and neutral ...


2

Your first two switches in the sketch are set up to basically reverse the polarity between the hot and neutral. this is really not a thing in AC, more used to reverse DC motors. I doubt this is up to code (though ill leave it for the code experts to chime in), and IT IS NOT safe and i'm not sure what function it would provide you. Normally the neutral ...


3

All vent and branch vent pipes shall be so graded and connected as to drain back to the drainage pipe by gravity. which this arrangement arguably does have. I believe that as the code is typically interpreted, the latter half is draining "forward" (in the direction of the vent) rather than "back" even though the water (condensation, ...


1

Regarding the propane torch: virtually no risk. They can sit there forever with no impact unless you subject it to fire or similar. Regarding the property: Evidently it is very painful in Massachusetts for his property to legally become yours. https://law.justia.com/codes/massachusetts/2006/gl-pt2-toc/gl-200a-toc.html It's a good idea to have written ...


2

Your plastic project box is not NEMA rated for handling AC power. You also will have difficulty achieving hard separation inside that box between AC mains and low voltage, as ThreePhaseEel discusses. Why run THHN in conduit, when you could run thermostat wire? Put the relay in the AC mains equipment and use the thermostat wire to carry 24V relay coil ...


4

Your relay-on-a-switch-loop is fine in general... Your relay-on-a-switch-loop turns out to be up to Code after all -- NEC 300.3(B) only requires the neutral ("grounded conductor") to be in the same conduit as the hots if it's necessary to route the neutral to a location to begin with (note that the wording about "grounded conductor" is ...


1

What you're doing is basically a switch loop through your control panel and three way switch. I believe this will be a violation of 300.3(B). 300.3(B) Conductors of the Same Circuit. All conductors of the same circuit and, where used, the grounded conductor and all equipment grounding conductors and bonding conductors shall be contained within the same ...


2

I need to post this as an answer, bc I don't have enough room in the comment response. This is an interesting and creative project. But I don't think it will operate as you hope. What is the "automation control"? A timer? Motion sensor? Remote control? Magic wand? If the relay is open and the user toggles the 3-way switch to turn on the light and ...


1

Aside from the electrical concerns, whoever installed your plumbing pipe and cut notches in the bottoms of all the floor joists, SERIOUSLY weakened the floor system. Sure, you can cut all sorts of holes into the web of the joist, but DON'T cut the bottom chord. If those joists were 10" or a foot deep, they probably don't have the strength of a 2x6 now....


7

You don't need a license to operate a plumbing torch. There's no danger of it spontaneously exploding if you keep it away from heat sources and open flames. He hasn't dealt with you punctually because he's an unreliable flake. Look up laws for abandoned property in your locality. Eventually his tools become your tools.


6

This bracket provides a building code approved solution for holes up to 6" through as many joists as you want - Joist Hole Reinforcer. Full disclosure, this is a product that I sell for the exact application in question. There are other ways to reinforce joists with holes, but I believe this is the only one that is code compliant out of the box. Hope ...


2

The simplest thing is probably to attach a 1x6 flat to the block wall on either side of the panel as a cleat for staples. That will let you keep it tidy without too much work or expense.


0

The panel makes the rules Beyond the NEC 210.4(B) call for common disconnect (i.e. an identified handle tie or multi-pole breaker) for multi-wire branch circuits, the old "rule of six" for service/structure disconnects, and the favorable treatment NEC 705.12(B)(2)(3)(b) gives to "opposite end" solar/DG feed-ins, the layout of breakers in ...


2

If this helps, I just had my service upgraded to 200A in Lansing, Michigan. Here is a before and after photo of a 1959 breaker panel vs. a 2020 installation. The old breaker box was mounted directly to the concrete wall. For reference, this is an exterior wall built in 1911 that tends to "sweat" during periods of heavy rainfall, so some physical ...


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