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The National Building Code (NBC) -not the electrical code- requires that smoke alarm be permanently connected to a lighting circuit, or one that supplies both lighting and receptacles. So if you have a junction box feeding a smoke detector, you can feed an outlet from there too. You will have to add a lighting circuit to it. AFCI/GFCI circuits are permitted, ...


-2

No. You are correct. Pressing the test button is an electrical test which should do absolutely nothing without power. If that is happening, either the wiring is not what you expect or the GFI outlet is defective. I suggest completely unwiring the GFI outlet to determine which is the cause. PS. It should not be necessary to remove the cover to determine if ...


4

Ok 2 parts, yes you are misunderstanding how a (listed) GFCI completes its test. The test is completed by the internal circuitry creating an imbalance. The clicking noise you hear is the mechanical debounce that helps the reset function work better (not all GFCI’s use this method but many do because who would trust a micro switch smaller than a pencil ...


7

Think aluminum Since you are concerned about costs, I would try to nudge you off novices' preconceptions about copper vs aluminum wire. Novices tend to "stay with what they know" (having worked with copper in 15/20A branch circuits), and tend to believe all the scary stories about aluminum wiring in 15/20A branch circuits. This extrapolates into ...


5

Personally, I'd switch to EMT once inside and away from the need for limited cover depth for burial. Maintains the conduit-as-grounding-path. No need for a junction on the wires - just a transition in conduit types at a pull point or box. Resists rodent teeth. Easily bent. Borrow, rent or buy a bender. Read up a bit on using a bender. Fulfills the "...


4

Once inside convert to NM wire type in a junction box then no conduit will be needed. If you are using thhn dual rated you can use non metallic flexible conduit and stay with the same wire if you already have the wire. Non metallic is usually called smurf tubing because it is usually blue but comes in many colors if your walls will be closed it will be fine, ...


0

Where I live what is most common is an atmospheric vacuum breaker. They are much cheaper than double/triple check backflow preventers. You would install it on the section of pipe that you labelled "house service line" with a reverse U that raises it above the highest point in your irrigation system. I do not know if there are code reasons or ...


0

To be code compliant in most areas you need a double check valve going to your irrigation system such as below. You don't needvacuum break control valves, in fact, they are problematic going uphill...just a regular electrically operated irrigation valve. Sorry, JACK, but your solution doesn't meet code in most areas.


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Since you're on well water I would think a regular check valve on the pipe right out of the house would be all you'd need. I know the RPZ's are good but awful expensive. If your line is copper, SharkBite makes one that's easy to install similar to the one pictured below.


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Generally you want the backflow as close to the supply as possible. So right here might be a good choice:


0

The NEC in 250.130(C) now requires extending an Equipment Ground Conductor to the grounding system when making an extension of a two-wire circuit that does not have an EGC. If your circuit was extended before the current requirement or was extended by local exception then the receptacle needs to be marked " No Equipment Ground" and the ground ...


0

My interpretation, which is not of course authoritative, is that if you want an eight foot fence you need to do it like this. The part of your plan outside mine towards the main road must be 4ft. The part towards the side must be 4 or 6 feet according to its distance from the street. Who is to really say what a side street side yard is? But that's my ...


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trying to make sense of your sense pull out a 20 amp 240 volt circuit out of the panel, install it in a junction box beside panel feed that junction box from that breaker, parallel it with your sense voltage leads using the proper connectors. nipple out of mains section of your panel using a proper bushing and sized large enough for sense connector to fit ...


0

First, the Sense takes a tiny amount of power. It doesn't need a 50A breaker (if it did, it would need a water-cooling system that was quite large!) So it's no problem for the Sense to share breakers with other circuits. Look at your circuit breakers (possibly pull one out, no need to detach the wire). See if it has markings that indicate it accepts 2 ...


0

Don’t put this device on anything larger than a 20 amp circuit. these monitors draw very little power and putting them on a large breaker is asking for problems if and when things go bad. Use a 15 or 20 amp circuit to power the system then if the worst happens you won’t be rewiring the entire panel. If your breakers allow 2 wires per breaker great add the ...


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