New answers tagged

1

Mounting a splicing wire connector turns it into a pumpkinterminal block We know that by definition, as per ZMVV.GuideInfo: Splicing wire connectors establish a connection between two or more conductors by means of mechanical pressure and are not intended to be permanently mounted. They are floating, such as a twist-on connector in an outlet box. , a ...


1

What if the wires are mounted while the splices remain floating? The wires could be bent and fixed neatly as one might do when setting up a terminal block, but then instead of using a terminal block, use a splicing connector. The following products are made by Advanced Cable Ties. In order, these are anchor mount, mounting base, mounting hole cable tie, and ...


6

That handrail does not meet code, because it is not continuous from top to bottom of stairway and the ends do not terminate correctly at the bottom. The Code (ICC R311.7.7) requires handrails: 1) Height to be between 30” and 38” above the nosing of the tread, and 2) Be continuous on at least one side of a stairway with 4 or more risers and be from a ...


4

I believe if tubing is used the end of the hand rail must be closed. We use square tubing quite a bit and close the ends at top and bottom I believe this is what the code is referring to.


3

To add to this answer, I wouldn't just add a surface mount box, I would Cut open the wall open a bit more to remove the wire from the box (it might be stapled inside the wall) Fully patch and paint the wall Drill a hole in the ceiling directly above Surface mount conduit with the existing wire Mount your surface box Why so much effort? If they cut this ...


2

Okay - that is absolutely not to code and a fire/shock hazard. You show an electrical box that is partially covered over by plaster/drywall. To fix, just cut the drywall off in front of the outlet 1-gang electrical box (the blue box), pop an extender on it to bring it flush with the surface of the drywall (for example), and install the outlet back normally. ...


0

I'd be inclined to saw a notch in the stud and install a proper box. Between a doorway and a corner the stud is not apt to be bearing much weight and can stand to have a notch for a shallow box cut out.


1

Thinking a bit outside the box, this is between a corner and a fireplace, so would you be able to add some fixed permanent or built-in shelving in this little corner? That way you could bring the new socket out and install it permanently in the framing for your new shelf ? but with the power socket in the white backplate? Or if that's a bit ambitious, ...


12

It looks like you are up against a corner on the left, which means you can't simply shift the outlet into the box location. In a perfect world you have enough cable to move the box to the other side of that stud. You would then simply repair your drywall. (We've since learned that there's a door to the right, just out of frame, making this impossible.) ...


0

If you are willing to do a little wall repair, this should be easy to correct, at least as far as we can see. Cut the wall in front of the box and patch the wall over the stud. Depending on what exact butchery is revealed, you might need a new box, you might not. If you do, just put one in, and patch the wall as needed. Planning to might well be the best ...


11

Use a surface mount electrical box:


4

Yeah, no. Panels do not work like switches and outlets. You can't jack the panel cover outward and use longer screws and have a drywall trim ring between panel cover and panel. No way. Not least, the breakers will fall out. Because the relationship between cover and panel must be precise; it's the only thing holding them in! You also can't bury the ...


3

Calculators I checked online returned 2% voltage drop for 4/0 Al at 200A load. I wouldn't hesitate at all at that size. 240.4(B) allows the next larger breaker size when the ampacity doesn't correspond to a standard size. This makes qualifying for the 83% rule irrelevant. The Informational Note in 2017 NEC 215.2 recommends a 3% drop maximum for Feeders, ...


4

The 83% derate only applies if it is all the service to a single dwelling unit. With 75A of A/C and two dryers, that sounds like something else. So let's ignore the 83% derate. Suppose we use 4/0 wire First, a couple common errors in sizing voltage drop are calculating ampacity on breaker trip - you should actually calculate it on practical daily load --...


0

But just so you know, if they ran >24" in a conduit or raceway, the plain old NEC 310.15(b)(3)(a) derate rules would still apply. With split-phase service (NOT 2-of-3-phases like NYC or Europe), all circuits contain 2 wires that count as far as this derate. (because other wires carry only differential current, e.g. a MWBC neutral, or travelers in a 3-way ...


0

To add onto TPE's answer When someone refers to non-metalic (or NM) cables they are referring to a specific type of cable. What I mean by this is that the term NM does not include for example XHHW-2 cable. Correct? (I think I'm reading too much into the term "non-metalic") NM refers to sheathed cable containing individual wires (Romex is the trade name ...


3

Neither cable needs to be derated here, for multiple reasons First off -- you only have one NM cable (the 14/2 W/G) in this hole, as the other cable (the 6-6-6-6) is a type SE cable; the two cables (NM and SE) are distinct in their constructions and usages, and are covered by different articles in the NEC (NM in Article 334, SE in Article 338). As a result,...


6

Yes, it's up to code, and you will only find the top hole on green wirenuts that are only used for ground connections.


Top 50 recent answers are included