New answers tagged

1

I'd use Insteon for this job The type of control flexibility you want with multiple controlled devices at a single wallstation isn't really addressed by "smart switches" per se, as the programming becomes involved enough that a single, standalone "smart" wallbox control with that functionality is no longer worthwhile. Instead, what you ...


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Also in Montgomery County, MD, though that probably doesn't matter much. My similar pipe had a leak once at a joint between two sections, and if it had been covered with drywall that would have been a bit of a repair job (which I have had to do for water leaks). A drop ceiling or other easily removable (i.e., no tools needed) covering may be a good solution. ...


5

For line voltage (120/240 - all 120V to ground, so basically the same voltage from a code perspective) you don't need a divider. A divider is needed when you have low voltage (network/TV/phone) sharing with line voltage. Unless you are sticking in a 240/120 receptacle (like an L14-20) you'll only have one neutral, so @manassehkatz-Moving 2 Codidact's concern ...


1

OK, first, fix your working space. That fan, vamonos. The 30" space, as illustrated, doesn't need to be centered on the panel. What you have there is a flush-mount panel, which is the bane of anyone who's ever tried to add a circuit. Lately it's been the fashion to destroy all "utility spaces" in the home. Utilities are important. ...


1

The required working space around the panel is 6-6" (6-1/2 feet) high, so you can't infringe on that from above. 30 inches wide (need not be centered, but doors need to be able to open fully) and 3 feet in front.


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I believe most TV mounts have a minimum depth for their lag bolts. From Rocketfish™ - Tilting TV Wall Mount for Most 32"-70" TVs Drill pilot holes to a depth of 3 in. (75 mm) using a 7/32 in. (5.5 mm) diameter drill bit. I really hope you don't hit any wires with the pilot hole nor the 2 3/4" lag bolts they supply.


2

Code isn't really relevant unless you were to block access to the panel (within 3 feet in front). Just don't hit any wires. Use screws that penetrate no more than about 1-1/4" into the lumber. All wires should be deeper than that. To respond to the hand-wringing about mount integrity... A 5/16" screw (properly piloted) into framing an inch will ...


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The fixture you show has an accessible junction box. First, remove the three sheet metal screws inside the can at the edge. Push the can up into the space. Then there is a spring tab you can reach on the junction box. You can see one of the two tabs in the phot in this post. The other side of the junction box will have the same setup. In your case, the ...


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You can block it. However, you should consider one of three other options: Disconnect - Find the other end. Disconnect it. Label it ("living room bookcase"). That way if someone (including yourself) years from now looks at the tangle of wiring and wonders "Hmmm, maybe this wire might go where I need it" or "What does this do, can I ...


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Two concerns that I know of: Water If the wire is at least a few inches off the floor then this is a non-issue. But if it is literally on the floor then water - whether deliberate from washing the floor or accidental from an overflow - could get into the cable and cause problems because standard NM cable is not rated for wet areas. Physical Protection As ...


3

Whoever maintains the fire alarms needs to fix this NFPA 72 10.6.3.2, 10.6.6, and 10.6.7.2 combine to require that a functioning source of secondary power to the alarm system must be present. Normally, this is provided by a set of sealed-lead type batteries in the FACP (Fire Alarm Control Panel) cabinet, or in a battery cabinet located adjacent to the FACP ...


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As per answer above , the overhang is very minimal and if done to keep framing square then yes it is fine ,,,In fact it is very common as it is people building these things not precision machinery ( someone could have tripped or concrete pump hose could have hit forms when pouring ) Regardless in all building codes there is a min bearing amount which in ...


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You need to provide protection "substantially equivalent to the wall of the equipment..." The governing NEC requirement for loadcenter "blank space" filler plates is in NEC 110.12(A): (A) Unused Openings. Unused openings, other than those intended for the operation of equipment, those intended for mounting purposes, or those permitted as ...


4

3D printers come in a bunch of different varieties. There are some that are able to print rocket parts. But your typical home/workshop/small commercial 3D printer is printing plastic. By melting it. Guess what: If your printer can melt it to print with it, sparks/fire inside a panel could melt it. Which would not be a good thing. A piece of sheet metal cut ...


8

One more step You'll need to send several specimens of your 3D-printed cover plate to Underwriter's Laboratories along with a $5000 check, and have them "UL-Classified" for the panel in question. You'll be able to 3D-print the "UL-Classified" mark on the cover plate once you have that certification. What UL will do is give it a variety of ...


4

The plastic fillers are not expensive--about $1.50. I have a big box of them but if you can’t find one a breaker is only a few dollars. Could you print one? It would not be listed but would be better than screwing or gluing a metal or plastic plate over openings I have seen both and inspectors have mentioned them but not failed inspections. On the screwed ...


1

No way. You need at least two kitchen countertop receptacle circuits. Those circuits can have nothing on them except: Receptacles in kitchen working areas Other general-use receptacles in the kitchen, dining area, and pantry. A wall clock. A gas oven/range with small needs for controls and oven light. A dishwasher is definitely not on that list.


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THHN must be entirely contained within conduit... Your approach won't work because NEC 310.10 requires that you use insulated conductors as part of a Chapter 3 wiring method, instead of standing on their own. but, you can use a stub length of conduit from the body to the box However, outdoor-rated boxes generally have hubs built into them that accept ...


3

Dining room, living room, bedroom and lighting receps all on the same circuit is totally legal under Code. It's a severe case of min-max'ing for builder cost rather than occupant usability, but it's not illegal at all. This "min-max"-ing is particularly strong in manufactured homes where a single factory builds tens of thousands; a guy can earn a ...


3

You're missing the termination temperature limits from 110.14(C)(1) You are correct that you are missing something. In particular, while THWN-2 wire can handle 90°C without an issue, that doesn't mean that the things hooked to it will be happy at that temperature. In particular, since we're dealing with a feeder here, distribution equipment, such as ...


1

In answer to your question if this is a code violation I can tell you it is not an NEC violation, but not for the reason you would think. In NEC Article 550 which covers mobile Homes, after the first paragraph, there is an informational note. It basically tells you that the electrical system in your Manufactured Housing is regulated and inspected under the ...


1

Feeder sizing isn't so simple The minimum rules for service and feeder capacity planning are found in NEC Article 220; while they don't account completely for your usecase, we can use a modified version of those procedures here. We start with the 550sf you gave, and multiply it by 3 to get the lighting and general receptacle load as-if this was part of its ...


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Go big. You can legally feed a 200 amp panel with a 50 amp breaker on 6 ga wire. Not that you'd want to do that, just an illustration of what's possible. In my shop, which is part of my house, I installed a 200 amp 40 space panel (Square D/ QO, not Homeline) fed by a 100 amp circuit from the main panel. You are smart in that you're installing a sub-panel ...


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First of all, you want a 240V sub-panel and run 2 hots instead of 1 (plus neutral and ground). This way, you can split the load between legs and get away with smaller gauge wire. If you don't already have it, get a 20A/240V shop heater instead of 40A/120V. The wiring will be cheaper. In fact, put the tools and dust collector on 240 volts if you can. The ...


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There should be no issue with the arrangement you plan to do. The only issue would be if moving the box required cutting the wall framing to allow the relocation. If the box is already protected by a GFCI outlet, that should cover any other concern that there may be.


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How your community adopts the electrical code in your area will dictate what is allowable. It is not uncommon to request and receive a variance for unusual situations.


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