New answers tagged

1

Current Code has very particular requirements for bathroom receptacles i.e. dedicated and 20A. This does not apply to bathroom hardwired loads. So we can avoid diving into that complexity. The word "outlet" is ambiguous because NEC refers to everything as an outlet lol. A hardwired load can be 15A or 20A if that's suitable for the loads. It can ...


1

Change the SMPS/power supply unit in your desktop. I had the same problem. Spent 6 months trying to solve the issue by changing inverters, etc without any luck. Finally found out that problem was with SMPS. Replaced the SMPS (Gigabyte p450b) with another one (Cooler Master 450) and the flickering went away.


0

Just spent an hour of my life lumping tv's from one room to another scratching my head as to why my lg tv keeps switching on and off, plugged it in in the other room and it worked! It was the F@£&#£ firestick remote! I nearly binned the TV and bought another, thank you so much for this post, I wonder how many people have scrapped their TV because of ...


1

OK, the female spade connector on the red wire is fried. If there's enough slack in that wire, you can cut off the connector and burnt wire. Go to an appliance repair store to get a match on the old connector. You could probably find similar ones at your home store but the ratings might not be the same and you'd also want a shrink tube. These connectors are ...


0

Give it a squeeze, if it flexes then it is low pressure pipe (probably for irrigation). If you cut it, be careful in case it is being used as conduit.


3

Since both old and new have problems, it is probably not a "bad" transformer, but rather something else that lead to the transformers failing. Two things to check: Mains voltage - Should be 120V (anywhere 110V to 125V is perfectly fine). If it is in the 200V - 240V range then you have this wired up to a 240V circuit instead of 120V and everything ...


1

Firstoff, do not put dimmers on receptacles except for testing. That is illegal and dangerous, unless you use a special magic receptacle that's keyed to reject all loads except certain lamps which you put the companion plug on. If that setup needs GFCI protection, then you would be better off learning all about GFCI's ability to protect downline loads ...


1

I'm currently running such a setup with an Aprilaire 8620W thermostat. AC from the heat pump, Heat from the heat pump when outside temp is >=40F, Emergency Heat from the boiler kicks in when outside temp is <40F. The thermostat initially installed was a Honeywell model, and that could be configured to support AC, or could be configured to support Heat,...


0

The motor is operating in an overloaded condition because it is producing more HP than the rated HP. his is probably because the pump is "running on the right side of the curve. You need to have a water meter and a pressure gauge on the pump discharge. With pressure (head) and GPM you can calculate the required HP. The product of your head and GPM ...


8

From the link you posted: The dimmer is rated for up to 210W of halogens with or without transformer. So if you have 6x 20W 12V halogen bulbs, total 120W, it's okay. You should check the power on the bulbs to make sure they're not 50W halogen bulbs, in which case it would exceed the rated power of the dimmer, although 12V 50W are pretty rare. When your ...


0

To prevent a fire (caused by current overheating), I like to know how much current must flow through the wire and ensure that wiring provide plenty of current capacity. You can install a fuse to ensure that the a short or similar will not cause the wire to overheat and start a fire.


0

Whatever wire you use, if it's going into construction, make sure it is rated for the purpose. The most common misuse I've seen is lack of FT4 rating.. I'm not going to list every type of suitable wire because it would be rather long and time consuming, especially if you're willing to run conduit. For LVDC voltage controlled LEDs, I'm personally partial to ...


0

This is fine as long as you maintain clearspace There is nothing wrong with framing a non-structural "bump out" to house a flushmount panel as long as you don't introduce foreign (i.e. non-electrical, such as HVAC or plumbing) systems directly above the panel or create a situation that violates the 30" by 36" (fridge sized) clearspace ...


1

Speaker wire works well for this, and you can get in-wall rated speaker wire, which usually has a 2nd common insulation around both insulated wires (like cat5). You can of course use regular mains-rated wiring in wall, but it's hard to tuck into tight spaces where you might want to hide an LED strip, and connecting to it legally takes a lot of space. Buy ...


5

With a range or dryer in particular, you have to pull it out and look. Many ranges are groundless, and bootleg the chassis of the machine to the neutral wire. This is exactly as dangerous as you'd expect, and has a body count - but most cases are mis-reported as incorrect wiring, when in fact the wiring was correct but simply broke. This bootlegging ground ...


1

#12 means 12 AWG wire size. That's a very beefy extension cord and you should be alright for anything that won't trip a 15A breaker (or a 20A breaker for that matter). You are welcome to unfurl the extension cord for a day or a week to power the shed, but you need to believably plan to coil it up and put it away soon. If you are aiming to bring permanent ...


0

Sure if the outlet or switch is grounded measuring from there to an unpainted metal point will show continuity if the range is grounded. However use caution you can damage an ohm meter even if there is a small current flowing on the ground of the range. It would be safest to turn the power off first. This advice can be true of the lighting circuit also. Some ...


1

The dimension of Encore 12/2 nm-b is .16x.45 inches. Belden Cable has a calculator, it says you can fit only 8 in 2".


3

So long as the total draw of all devices plugged in remains below the amp capacity of the power strip, the extension cord, the permanent wiring, and the breaker, you'll be fine. I believe the admonition against plugging in a power strip is that You are not allowed (by NEC) to use an extension cord for permanent wiring. i.e. if you need an outlet on the ...


2

For the reason why you can't strip the cable where it enters the conduit, that has to do with rating of the individual wires. While it is possible that the individual wires inside a UF (or NM or any other) cable may be the same type/quality (THWN) that can be run directly in conduit, there is no guarantee. Even if they are "basically the same thing"...


1

There is nothing wrong with running UF thru conduit, it's just tough and you have to pay attention to "fill requirements"...go big! Then land it in the sub-panel and strip it there. There are other requirements for a sub-panel, but that question has been asked and answered so many times here that if you do a quick search, you'll find what you need ...


2

12 Gauge. 3 Conductor. USB devices are so low current I wouldn't worry about them. You can plug in as many things as you want as long as the total current is below the cord's specification.


2

First, make sure you are searching broadly. Many homeowners get stuck in the "big box store" rut and search only Lowes, Home Depot and Menards... failing to realize that family-owned lumber supplies, electrical supply houses, and hardware stores all sell breakers. Look at your bus stab for notches. Or, Plug-on Neutral. You cannot put tandem ...


0

This is quite definitely possible, and actually a relatively good setup What you describe (a heat pump with hydronic backup heat) is quite supportable by most thermostats that can support a two-transformer, single-stage heat pump system. Rc, C, Y, G, and O/B from the thermostat are brought to the air handler, with C, Y, and O/B continuing to the heat pump ...


1

Rules may be different for state. Not every metal conduit approved as ground. In Ontario, for instance, only EMT with screw type couplings and connectors approved as proper ground. Using compressed connectors, ground wire should be pulled. If you are not know for sure, pulling ground wire is better then not pulling.


4

What are the NEC rules governing this? You are not allowed to use any wiring method, except for specific wiring methods listed (enumerated) in the back half of NEC Chapter 3. (The Article 300s). Therein, you will find an article for each allowed wiring method. Where a wiring method allows use of the pipe as the ground, it will specifically say so in that ...


0

Just change the second outlet to a gfi and line side everything on the first and second outlet. Now light is no longer on load of gfi but both outlets are still protected.


1

Two ways to connect 3-way switches and load. Firt feed and load in same junction box. Second feed and load connected in different boxes. In second only three wires run between boxes: two travelers and one phase return. So two wires live voltage.


2

Those testers detect electromagnetic fields. It's downstream of a dimmer There are three dimmer technologies. Variacs are a variable transformer which steps down voltage, giving a sine wave, but they are huge and heavy. Rheostats are a variable resistor that adds impedance, giving a sine wave, but they make stupefying amounts of heat. Both of these, being ...


0

There may be phantom voltages coupled-in, and especially apparent when the circuit is off. Testers can be quite sensitive, and your phantom voltage can be as high as half the line voltage, so 60V. These are not necessarily an electrical problem, but could trip your tester. To check for this, temporarily add a low-impedance passive load at the end of your run....


0

There are different classifications of testers with different sensitivity. An example of this is a tester used for hvac circuits that will detect 18vac. The 18v tester will detect 120v from almost a foot away so I think that may be what you have. My standard non contact tester is 90-1000v but if I have it turned on when I open my transformer vault 34500v it ...


0

In that kind of distance strong electromagnetic field may caused if the feed and neutral do not run close together. Bad practice of wiring from not enough qualified electricians. Feed and neutral to load may be in different conduits.


6

Given that your box is surface mounted, #1 (domed cover) is the correct answer. Converting to a 4x4 box is way too much work. Using a mud ring (even a flat one) with a cover plate will create sharp edges to snag things. Noting that 4-11/16" boxes have plenty of room for GFCIs and such, if your garage is wanting for a GFCI on that circuit/those ...


1

The conduits will bend even if rigid, if thin wall or emt they are easily bent into place. I pull my wiring out and mark with a paint pen or sharpie stripes take a picture or draw a schematic black wire 1 has 1 stripe white wire 1 has 1. Red 1 has 1 then black 2 has 2 etc. normally not more than 5 in a box keeps from having so many stripes). Power off of ...


2

Buy a better box if you want it to be sturdy. Partially because there's a shortage, I couldn't buy a 2-gang old work plastic blue box like the one you pictured in the question. Nearby, there was a much pricier fiberglass box that came with metal tabs. Not only will that box grip anything, it doesn't warp at all. The next step up from there would be a metal ...


2

The black wire going into the groups of black wires with the red wire nut is your feed. The solo black and red wires were your travelers to the other switch. Connect your feed to one of the travelers. Try your other switch. If the switch position is correct, toggle up is on, toggle down is off, you're good to go, cap the unused traveler. If not, then connect ...


2

If your motion sensitive lights do not come on during the day when you walk by, then they also have a built in light sensor and are designed to not come on if there's enough light. Simply re-aim one of your existing outdoor lights to shine more directly on the motion sensor and the sensor's light detector should automatically disable the motion sensing ...


12

All your listed options will work. Folded edge covers always fit a bit wonky, unfortunately they don't make a crushed corner version for 4-11/16" boxes Gap between faceplate and mud ring that looks incorrect, possible hazard A lot of work, 4.5" face plate will extend past edge of box, less hazard A lot of work, will look the best, possible damage ...


5

Good thing you found this it was not correct. The first 2 methods are both ok and would depend on what look you want. Code actually requires more than 1 screw for the receptacles. If you use option 1 you can put all 3 screws in if you like but NEC 110.14.A requires more than 1 for each (to anchor the receptacle). You can use the 4-0 box and covers your the ...


2

If both sets of lights are on the same circuit at the same location, a 3-way switch is all you'll need. Since neutrals will be tied together, connect the feed to the dark screw (common terminal) and the load, usually black or red, from each set of lights to the two remaining terminals on the switch.


0

What you are looking for is a 120v double pole switch (search google, amazon, etc for more info and circuit examples). That will allow you to use one switch to control 2 circuits. You would wire the regular light to be on in the on position and the motion controlled light to be on is the off position.


0

Ideal way to fix that is a tailor cover, the first one you've shown. The bottom one is also a tailor cover, but for a 4x4 box from the look.


2

I'd use a 4/0-4/0-2/0-4 Mobile Home Feeder cable for this job Given that you aren't going to be pushing a full 200A over the cable (which'd require 250kcmil Al, since the 83% reduction in 310.15(B)(7) doesn't apply to your situation), but need a 4-wire cable as your shed is getting powered by a feeder from your service disconnect at the pole, I'd use a 4/0-4/...


1

Remember: the run from service panel to first AFCI must be either metal-jacketed cable or metal conduit. I would find that drawing very confusing. It's always a struggle to show neutral on a white background (hint: don't), but what ere they thinking? White is the legally required neutral color, and black is the conventional hot color. So that bung ...


2

The National Building Code (NBC) -not the electrical code- requires that smoke alarm be permanently connected to a lighting circuit, or one that supplies both lighting and receptacles. So if you have a junction box feeding a smoke detector, you can feed an outlet from there too. You will have to add a lighting circuit to it. AFCI/GFCI circuits are permitted, ...


1

Your plan has a good chance of succeeding as I have done similar work and was successful. I would suggest adding a new junction box, old work box, close to your existing outlet. You can't just go around eliminating outlets because you need the box. Code requires where you need to put them. Just add a new box, pigtail the feed from the existing outlet to the ...


0

Drop the wire in the outside wall behind the bell. Either in the stud bay or maybe if there is space behind the wood trim do it there. Then drill from outside, at the level of the box, straight into a side punch out of the box. The only visible patch is to the wood. Much easier to patch up white painted wood at shin level than to patch the wall where ...


2

You can share GFCI receptacles. You might have to. OK. Here's a science fact you do not know, and neither do the people who wrote that instruction. A GFCI is not a receptacle. It is a system of protection that can protect any number of outlets. In fact they make GFCIs that are not receptacles - GFCI only, or GFCI+breaker, or GFCI+switch. Anyway, every ...


15

No, and you'll crack the box if you try. Plastic is not metal. Plastic boxes are flimsy things. They don't have any strength except where they have been gusseted specifically to have strength. This means you cannot simply add mounting points anywhere on the box. The box will simply crack there, either from the violence of a self-drilling screw, or the ...


3

If memory serves, you want CI-2 2 hole cable straps, but you should call the hardware store before you order to confirm. If you get the right size strap you can bend it around the cable and run a single screw through both holes. 10 by 1" pan head wood screws with #2 Robertson heads work well. You can use them on wood and also in concrete with 1/4&...


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