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It's conceivable to have such a thing, but I would rely on two design keystones to do it: Low voltage, isolated power supply, so there's only 12V in the light. That's harmless. LED emitters to eliminate the heat problem you are concerned with. Regardless, Ed Beal has identified that light as complete junk. You must be very, very careful when shopping for ...


1

"Ground loop" is a phrase from audio design. Ask an audio engineer. It is practically not a thing in mains electrical, and let's think about why. Safety ground has two jobs: Return natural current (ESD, lightning) to source (being earth) Return human-generated fault current to source (being neutral). The subject of a "ground loop" is ...


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The term "ground loop" usually refers to a circuit in which various "end items" have a ground wire attached, and the ground wire from one item goes to the ground attachement on the next, and so on, with an earth ground connection somewhere in this continuous loop of wiring. The "end items" could be components on a circuit ...


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Well I took some time to try and find this fixture to see if it was listed and the voltage used and light source. “Beautiful halo” appears to be at best a horrible company at worst a total scam company. So I would not do any mail order from them 620 reviews 565, 1 Star reviews and only 24, 5 star reviews. Could this be done with a live growing plant? Yes ...


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The reason is to provide a path to trip a breaker when the first fault develops and to limit (control) voltage to ground. The secondary of a transformer is isolated from ground, if left in that state a single fault on a line conductor on a 120/240v service would make one leg measure 0v to ground, 120v to ground on the neutral, and 240v to ground on the other ...


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There is usually a shutoff switch for the system located near it - sometimes there is also one located in a more convenient location. If not, find the correct circuit breaker and shut that off.


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You can use proper AC mains wiring methods on a desk. I'm a big fan of metal boxes, EMT conduit and THHN wires within the conduit, since it's so tough you are unlikely to get in too much trouble. You put either an inlet on the desk, or simply a cord going into a junction box with a proper strain relief, and that cord powers the whole desk.


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The reason they're allowed to be mixed in a main is a convoluted tale. In principle they're supposed to be separated there too; however panels need a feature to keep 120/240V power from floating at some unnaturally high voltage to earth, e.g. 9600V from a transformer leak. That would cause problems for insulation in devices. So they take one of the active ...


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NEC prohibits use of that junk DealExtreme is all dangerous trash; it's the exact same cheap Cheese junkstream as AliExpress, BangGood, eBay and Amazon Marketplace. Buying anything from them that touches mains power is simply out of the question. NEC 110.2. NEC also prohibits misapplication Further, NEC 110.3(B) applies, which requires you to obey labeling ...


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Probably not, since it's an LED bulb; and while there seem to be very few details on the website, the link calls it out as 220-240V. Some "wide range" LED supplies work from 85V to 277V but this is almost certainly not one of those. An old-fashioned incandescent 240V bulb will work fine on 120V, at roughly 1/4 power, and thus it will be dim and ...


2

There's a gizmo made for precisely this sort of job While Exception 1 to NEC 800.133(A)(1)(c) or 800.133(A)(2) would permit the shared sleeve you describe, I would not bother with your conduit sleeve approach here to begin with as the fireblocking foam fill would create issues with potential cable damage during re-entry that could be quite troublesome. ...


5

This seems like a shopping question, and so would be considered off-topic.. That said, a web search for 'extension cord switch' produced a number of off-the-shelf results that look like they will do exactly what you're looking for. Add one or two regular extension cords if necessary for added length.


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No, you cannot mix AC mains and low-voltage wiring (such as network cables) in the same conduit. The length of the run is not important, it's prohibited. Run two separate conduits and you'll be good.


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What I see in this area is emt run just up the wall and a few inches into the soffit (as a sleeve). NM cable is used in this sleeve and there is a small white bushing that you put on top of the conduit where the NM comes out of it to protect it from chafing. Most AC disconnects fed from attics in this area are wired this way.


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The answer depends upon power demands of the "appliances". If they have high power needs like a clothes dryer, water heater, electric range, air conditioner, etc. that would be a different approach than simpler 120v appliances. You'll need to source a switch with the correct rating. Also, heavy duty appliances would need to have similar power ...


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You can remove the cover plate and outlet and install a box entender similar the the one below. Then run your conduit out of this box to the additional flush mounted boxes and outlets. If these outlets will be in a basement or garage they will need to be GFCI protected.


4

Put an extension box (or box extender) on the outlet box, and run conduit from that along the wall, assuming you are OK with the aesthetics of that. For a slightly "nicer" look, use wiremold instead of conduit. I don't mind conduit, myself, and it costs a lot less.


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So, given the comments, although electrically this would work, it is unsafe and a code violation. This is because the hot and neutral are to be in the same raceway to have the magnetic field of the hot wire cancel out the magnetic field of the return wire, and thus reduce any induction eddies in any nearby metal components. Such eddies could cause heat ...


1

This sounds to me like a problem with a multiwire branch circuit. A multiwire branch circuit is a circuit in which the neutral is shared. This works because Line A and Line B are 180 degrees out of phase, so the neutral current is within the normal range even though it's doing double duty as a return path for both the upper and lower loads in the circuit. ...


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Something like this perhaps? Your question is somewhat ambiguous but this sort of independently controlled power strip appears to meet the requirement:


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Throw the box extender ring on there and roll Since you have a metal box, the most straightforward thing to do would indeed be to toss the appropriate size extension ring on there and go. You can also use a surface raceway starter box if you'd prefer, but those aren't available in quite as many sizes. As to Code compliance? Well, Code doesn't care one whit ...


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This is "you getting discouraged" after the first try I get it, repairs are frustrating, meeting repairpeople is a disruption to your day, claims are intimidating; they're designed to be, to deter frivolous claims. But you have to do them. It is the nature of intermittent problems that iteration is required to fix them. Because the problem is ...


1

That tester is designed only to be used with both test leads on wires. All your measurements taken with one lead floating in air, are improper use of the device, which means the measurements are meaningless from any practical point of view. The glow you see is a curious artifact; if you have any interest in why, that would be an appropriate question on the ...


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It's not normal, and you probably have loose connections somewhere. As usual in my experience, "Home insurance" looks like a scam that does not solve anything. Send incompetent who sees nothing wrong, laugh all the way to the bank. Won't pay for a competent serviceman, they have their own special people who are selectively blind. If (as Jack asks ...


1

I wanted to follow up with the correct answer for anyone who might find this thread in the future. We're in the middle of a kitchen/dining remodel, so I waited until the electricians were here for their rough-in and asked them about this hall fixture. One little detail I forgot to mention regarding the two wires from the pipe: The pipe is "filled" ...


1

Looking at the tester on my desktop computer I could see that is a neon light tester. The reason the lamp is not lighting up with the light bulb in and power on is a neon light takes 90-92 volts to ignite, the lightbulb may cause enough of a voltage drop so it won’t light. I can’t really remember what the threshold is but there is normally a resistor to ...


2

A receptacle not serving the basin has no height requirement in a dwelling unit, but... 2017 NEC 210.52(D)Bathrooms. At least one receptacle shall be installed in bathrooms within 3 ft of the outside edge of each basin...In no case ...be located more than 12 in. below the top of the basin. I don't have record of when this was adopted but it isn't highlighted ...


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From the document you linked one blue wire connects to live and the other to the live terminal of he lamps.


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OK, the red tape and the yellow taped black wires go to your single switch, terminals 1 and 2 on your picture. The blue taped black wire is your common load for the three way switch since you've only got one breaker and should go to the #4, black terminal, on your picture. The other two blue taped wires on the white and red wires are the travelers and should ...


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If you're not sure how the terminals on a switch are used, the best thing to do is to unwire it and test the continuity between each pair of terminals, in each switch position. In this case, you can be pretty confident about the two-way switch. You just need to find which terminal on the three-way is the common. "...do I connect the yellow and red Black ...


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I have to jump to a conclusion that you added the indoor breaker because the outdoor one tripped numerous times, this could make the tripping mechanism more sensitive. But it could be ambient heat, maybe a loose connection creating extra heat, or just a difference within manufacturing tolerance or an manufacturing alteration that resulted in an different ...


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Yes it is allowed, up through the 2020 NEC section 240.15(B)(1) single pole 120/240v breakers with handle ties are still allowed when the MWBC only feeds line to neutral loads. I don't have my old books, but it wasn't until the 2000's that the common trip requirements entered the code, but even then your local authority may have not have immediately adopted ...


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Yes, it was allowed to have MWBC on separate breakers. My house was built in 1981 and I had my refrig and two outlets on one MWBC and my dishwasher and disposal on another. They were not handle tied and not even next to each other in the panel but they were on different phases so the neutral wouldn't be overloaded. The whole subdivision was built like that ...


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I suspect the handle-tie requirement came along either in the late 90s or the 00s. Back in 1994 they were still allowing 3-prong range and dryer connections to be built (though, not with NM nor UF cable).


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Can’t power bathroom receps from non-bathroom circuits A recep in a bathroom is only allowed to draw power from 2 kinds of circuits, and this is a very narrow definition: A. Circuits which only power bathroom receptacles (in any number of bathrooms) B. Circuits which only power recep or hardwired loads in this bathroom Any circuit that powers anything in ...


0

Woops, these wires are not to code! With tc cables on split systems this could be code but they require a covering. Not just the jacket.


0

Once a breaker trips multiple times, it starts to take less and less to make it trip again. The bi-metal strips used to sense an overload by bending inside of the breaker develop what's called a "thermal memory" in that they stop returning all the way to their original position when they cool down, so they need less load to make them trip again. ...


0

A: Breaker trip ratings aren't exact. They have to fit a certain profile, but there are tolerances in manufacturing that will cause one circuit breaker to trip earlier than another equally marked breaker, even from the same production line. Both fit within the prescribed limits and both get labelled with the same amp rating. This is the first reason why a ...


4

The burners on stoves are either on or off, there's no "variable" resistance in them. The "variable" part comes from the switch that has a bi-metal switch that varies the amount of time the burner is on. At low temperatures the switch opens fast so the burner doesn't get too hot. When you set the switch for high temperatures, the bi-metal ...


-2

The white wire can be used as a ground wire. It goes to the the neural bar witch is grounded. Black to black, red to red, and green to the white.


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This really needs to start with a conversation with your AHJ. What you need to know is if your legacy setup is grandfathered. And then you can have a talk about your options about modernizing it. That knife switch, which I see high on the wall above a walkway, is not a player. Simple as that. It's not in a legal location for any service equipment to be....


1

A ground rod is no substitute for a ground wire. They do completely different jobs. The RV branch needs a ground wire in addition to the ground rod. Since the cable is orange, clearly it was manufactured with a ground wire in it; that will have to be restored by either putting it to good use, or replacing the defective parts of the cable if it is ...


2

Starting at the last working outlet, pull the outlet out, after turning off the power, and check the connections, If the backstabs are used, remove them and use the screw terminals with a shepherd's hook on the wires. Then work your way down doing the same to the remaining outlets


1

Unless you're planning a battery the size of a Tesla WallPack, (which I believe has a 240 inverter built in), you're probably going to be better off with a generator than a battery. Good ones aren't cheap (see, e.g. the Generac line), but they are designed to run indefinitely. And that can be a good thing when a hurricane takes out power for a week.


1

Adding to another answer: Looks like the neutral is quite a bit larger than the feeders. When I see that I think they just wired it with "stuff they had laying around". There are specific rules about "taps" (NEC 240.2): Tap runs of 10' or less must be enclosed in a raceway, have an ampacity of at least 10% of the circuit it's attached to ...


17

Slide a flat-bladed screwdriver into a rectangular hole in the back (rounded) end. Pry the inner (deepest) end of the locking tab outward gently while applying pressure to separate the bulb socket from the back cover at the joint that jogs its way around the middle. If you're not able to release the tab from the back, use a knife point from the outside, ...


1

Check instructions for maximum fuse/breaker size on new cooktop - could be lower than 50 amps. Would be a good idea to re-wire that mess, but requires a lot of work. A new panel location that meets NEC requirements would have to be selected and all circuits extended to the new location, some of the old panels could be kept as junction boxes.


3

The RV circuit ought to have a ground wire to the panel. It having a local ground rod means grounded metal parts of the RV won't float up to dangerous voltage levels relative to the surrounding dirt, but without a ground wire back to the panel various faults to ground might not trip the breaker. Grounding might not have been required at the time of ...


3

Volts is the "pressure" or force behind electricity. Note that 240V power has 20 times the force of a 12 volt battery. Amps is the flow/volume of electricity. Power (the thing you ultimately want) is pressure x flow, or volts x amps. For instance the Oroville Dam has 600 feet of head (water pressure). Flowing 1000 cubic feet per second of water, ...


2

These are not legal and cannot obtain a UL listing; therefore reputable home stores won't sell them. They are only offered via shady sales channels like AliExpress, BangGood, eBay or Amazon Marketplace, which is an eBay-like flea market folded into Amazon listings. Some are cheap Chinese and others are built out of UL-listed parts by handymen in their ...


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