New answers tagged

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There are devices designed to allow this to work, and to not endanger you while you install it. (This one is just the first I found, there are probably cheaper ones.) In the early days of powerline communications, they just suggested installing a small capacitor joining the two sides of the circuit. It must be able to take 240V, and to be small enough to ...


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Straight up, this is a hard sell First, EVSE's require a dedicated circuit. NEC 210.17. Second, a 50A circuit can only serve one thing - NEC 210.23. So it cannot serve a hardwired driveway melter and also an EVSE receptacle. So that's right out. Third, NEC 625.42 says the EVSE can be cord-and-plug connected if all are true: 1) it's part of a listed ...


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Never do random things in electrical. You will stumble upon combinations that will work but will kill you. Pause to learn what exactly it is you are doing. Only then proceed. OK, so you had a GFCI that was previously installed and worked before, and now suddenly is tripping. The most important point is that GFCI devices are capable of protecting ...


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It involves rewiring but you could install two single way switches in parallel. I just went through this to do a in line bathroom fan controlled at two bathrooms:


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20 AWG is rated for 5 amps, so it's good for taking any strip as far as you ought to. I prefer 22 AWG or 0.25 mm2, and stranded wire. The reason is, if the wires are any thicker, they will tend to "wag the dog", pulling the LED strip out of shape/position and potentially tearing off the solder pad. The "0.75" on the output terminals is surely not a ...


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As you described: The main panel has three circuits, The circuit 1 is a lighting circuit, for a 3-way circuit, for a group of interconnected lighting devices, The circuit 2 is a power circuit, with a first group of interconnected 3 outlets, The circuit 3 is a power circuit, with a second group of interconnected 3 outlets. Now the following recommendations ...


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You do want the two breakers for a multiwire branch circuit to be right next to each other so the handles can be tied together, but in terms of overload protection and the effect on the neutral, it should not be a problem. The slots on a breaker panel go +-+-, so a two pole breaker will draw from +- and the maximum load on the neutral will never be double ...


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American residential power is usually two split-phase legs off a power pole mounted transformer. You'll get the best connection if your two powerline adapters are on the same circuit, but you have a good chance of them working even if they are not on the same circuit as long as they are on the same leg. And since there are only two legs in a normal house, ...


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Cap each end with a wire nut and leave it in its junction box. Do not trim away the ends of the wires. That could confuse a future maintainer, and someone might find a use for that wire someday. If you maintain infrastructure documentation on your home, add a note describing the abandoned wire. If you do not maintain infrastructure documentation on ...


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Yes, you can, and the general idea is: If the power feed comes first to the switchbox you want to keep: Convert your 3 + ground to 2 + ground by capping off the red wire with wire nuts at both ends. (see Correct way to remove a red wire from a circuit) Replace switch with outlet, wire up. Replace remaining 3-way switch with a 2 way, and pigtail some new ...


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I did the unthinkable, and started to read the manual for the product you linked, and in the troubleshooting section there is a theme: Try another wall socket and make sure all powerline devices are on the same electrical circuit. If you search the PDF for "circuit" you find this phrase several times. I didn't find where the manual lists using the same ...


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Cross-phase communication for power line carrier products can be a challenging problem. (see a white paper from Intellon, a manufacturer of PLC devices, there.) You may be able to improve the coupling between phases, at least for a short time, by turning on an electric-powered heating appliance such as a range, oven, clothes dryer, or water heater. If ...


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A large enough junction box First, you are going to need a very large junction box to do all this splicing. Let's count conductors. Two /2 cables and one /3 cable = 7 conductors to splice. Plus the 7 conductors they'll meet in this box. Plus 1 conductor count to cover all ground wires Plus 1 conductor count to cover all cable clamps Plus 2 conductor ...


1

When you have a GFCI+receptacle+switch, the 2 screws are the GFCI "Line" in, and the two wires are for the switch. The switch either connects the wires or does not. Behind a warning sticker are the LOAD terminals, but you should not use those unless you know what you are doing. The sticker says as much.


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I would get some white heat shrink slide it over the conductors and make sure it extends inside the box the 1/4” and at least it’s width past where the sheath was removed. I have skinned the outer sheath several times in the past. The inspector only asked to verify if it was listed and then asked me to change from the black shrink tubing to match the color ...


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That sounds like a 3 way switch but I don’t think I have seen one labeled that way. Other than the copper you only had 2 wires I think , I would connect 1 to L1 and the other to L , I believe l is the common for a 3 way and L1& L2 are for the travelers , but for a single switch we just don’t use L2 . The switch won’t have on and off embossed on it if ...


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The weak link in the grounding may be the cover. Your fully-raised cover only contacts the (grounded) box at the edges and through the screws. A proper ground requires a cover with flattened corners, to make solid contact with the corners of the junction box. The flat contact between the receptacle's strap and the cover completes the ground path.


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You'll need to use both a transformer and relays. Some relays have built-in transformers, but the transformers don't necessarily have the "oomph" to run both the relay and the Nest. Transformers are about $13 and come in a variety of form-factors. Relays also. In most such installations you will have freedom as to where to put the Nest; it doesn't ...


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At the main service the grounding(bare wire) and grounded conductor (white wire/neutral) are together. ANY panel (aka sub panel) after the main panel is a sub panel and the grounded conductor (white wire/aka neutral) are not bonded and should be separated. Period! You have a floating ground condition and someone could get hurt and also the GFCI may never ...


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I've come across a few boxes that were like this, have accidentally contacted live wires to them (with enough oomph behind the arc to weld it to the box) and I will say wire everything securely and insulate or trim down any exposed wire if you do any work in them. In my experience, the discharge to the box didn't trip the breaker and it was blind luck that ...


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It's a rating. Like tires. Go shopping for tires. Almost any tire these days is rated 112 mph. *You're allowed to drive 65 on those, it is saying don't exceed 112 mph*. It's the same with subpanels: The "100A" is a maximum rating. Do not exceed 100A. However, you certainly should exceed your feed-breaker size of 50A. Even if 50A panels existed, ...


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50A is not a standard panel size, you will find a few more options if you search 60A. You can use a panel rated for higher than the feeder, the panel rating is the maximum current allowed. You may wan't to consider checking your wire size, the instructions for the last hot tub I installed specified #6 wire, most of the time #6 can be protected at 60A. (...


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First problem is that you have multiple grounds, because your main panel is grounded and now you've bonded grounds in your subpanel. This is illegal and not safe. As for your GFI's as long as your box the device is in has continuity to ground, which is done through the bonding screw in the subpanel you should be fine. Someone mentioned grounding the panel ...


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I really have to disagree for the following reason. First the tap rule is found in Article 240 Which is for overcurrent protection. More specifically 240.21(B) "Feeder Conductors" (2) "Taps not over 25 ft long" which says you can only use the tap rule if it meets all 3 requirements. Part 2 of that requirement states: The tap conductors terminate in a ...


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Using a larger sub panel will not be a problem but the breaker must stay a 50 AMP in the main panel. You can utilize the 50 Amp breaker in the hot tub panel as a connection point for the new wire run or just use that junction as a splice point. If you do that, I don't think you can double lug the wires and would have to use split-bolt connectors (buy a lot ...


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Just wire it up. There is no problem using a sub panel that can take more current than you will ever feed it. Points to note: The cable to your hot tub will be rated for 50A (not 100A); therefore you must not upgrade the breaker in your main panel to 100A. It would be sensible to add a note near the main panel that the cable is only rated for 50A, so not ...


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The sales info I looked at showed it with a 3 wire plug so it should be ok. Some electronic controlled devices require a neutral and then a 4 wire would be needed but it looks to be straight 240 so your plan should work. As far as GFCI code specifies 15 & 20 amp circuits so it would not be required but gfci’s around liquid are a good idea.


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Regarding running costs, at a price of 11.5 cents a kilowatt hour a 1 Watt bulb left on all year would cost $1.00. So assuming you only have the light on when its dark, say an average 8 hours a day throughout the year then removing the 3 LED bulbs would save you about $5.


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No the requirement is 6” from the back of the box , no tape measure a dollar bill will , if you only have a 20 I will trade you for a dollar and you will be good,,, ok that has only almost worked once LOL. My first job as a licensed electrician my dad said I will save you thousands and went back and clipped all my wires on the rough in , the inspector knew ...


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The answer is yes. The tap rules do allow this and it is common in older homes to tap a duplex off the supply, conduit from the tap to the outlet box is usually required and metal flex MC /AC is normally used. The 10 foot tap rule has always been used on every example of this that I have seen. On both electric stove tops on top of the counter and single ...


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Assuming we are talking about the US/Canada, I'll make some basic assumptions: Not the stove just the oven would almost always mean electric oven. That is because gas is great for a cooktop but not as useful for an oven. So typically a combination cooktop/oven will use gas but not when they are separate. Electric oven typically means 30A or 40A dedicated ...


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My non-code, unofficial, somewhat hackish, minimally risky solution would be to: Cut the wire as long as possible near the socket base. You'll need at least 3/4" of good wire. Cut the wire at an undamaged point on the other side of the damage. Strip both wires 3/8" and twist well (but not so vigorously that you damage it). Install a butt-splice connector ...


4

How about we start by marking some wires with colored tape. Wires that are supposed to be hot all the time get marked black. Wires associated with the fan hot (that we switch) get red. Wires associated with the lamp hot (that is dimmed) get blue. Mark the appropriate hot wires amongst those five cables. On the dimmer, you mark the supply wire black (...


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You don't solder something onto the center contact. Multiple reasons, one being it's already damaged form too much heat, another being the fact that a lamp socket should be UL rated, and that goes out the window when you modify it. You buy a new lamp socket (at your local hardware store, or lacking one, online) and replace the whole socket. This will ...


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Yes, that will cut energy use in half, though the type of bulb (LED, CFL, incandescent, one that's not invented yet) does not matter. Of course, you also get half the light. A bulb which is removed does not use any electricity whether or not the fixture is switched on (James Thurber's Grandmother notwithstanding, for the literarily inclined.)


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No! The wire is (almost certainly) only rated for 20A. If the breaker is tripping because more than 20A is flowing, then uprating the breaker will mean more than 20A flows through the wires, your wires heat up, and your house burns down. (If the breaker is tripping because it's a GFCI breaker and there is a ground fault, then a 30A GFCI breaker will also ...


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The conduit is the grounding path Note that the wiring in your case is run not using sheathed cables, but as individual wires inside a metallic conduit (aka the pipe-like stuff you see heading off to the left in your picture). As a result, the conduit is a serviceable grounding path in its own right, connecting the receptacle grounds and boxes to the ...


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Since it's all conduit, you should be able to stuff a ground wire down it, by hook or by crook Since we're feeding a 100A panel via conduit, getting a ground in there isn't as hard as it sounds. You only need about 75-80' of 8AWG bare stranded copper for this, and should be able to pull it through by turning off the feeder in the main panel, unhooking it ...


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Diode in reverse parallel with Led (or Led with limiting resistor). Should give you a halfwave rectified 60hz sine & the Led will still light up, but some people might notice said flicker. You might compensate the flicker by evening out sinewave with simple RC. Might be all simpler than a bridge rectifier circuit.


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Panel issues First, manasshkatz correctly spotted the alien breaker second from bottom on the right side. The lower left breaker is a Siemens QP. Those alien breakers have gotta go. You need "Westinghouse" (read: Cutler Hammer/Eaton) BR/C family, commonly known as BR. The 30A Siemens is a mystery. There's almost no legitimate use for a 30A 1-pole breaker....


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A GFCI breaker does not know or care what happens upstream (elsewhere in the subpanel or back at the main panel. All that matters is that neutral and hot are connected to it properly so that it can detect the difference between them. If there is a ground wire going to the protected device then that ground must be separate from neutral until sometime past the ...


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As you seem to know, the "bare" wires, along with any green or yellow/green wires, are always and only Equipment Safety Ground. They get used for nothing else. How the 3 wires must be allocated NEC 110.3(B) requires you install the light switches according to the instructions. This is not optional. Since Reading the Fine Manual is mandatory, you see the "...


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Flip one side from L1 to L2 Your switches are intended for both single-pole and multi-way (multi-location) applications; as a result, both the "up" and the "down" positions on the switch connect COM to another terminal (either L1 or L2, depending on which position we're talking about), instead of having only one position that connects the terminals together,...


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What the Code prohibits is exactly what you're complaining about: having to venture into a pitch dark space because the light switch is on the far side of it. So what you want isn't optional; it's probably mandatory to use one of these cures: Multi-way switching so the space can be lit from either end Competent motion sensors to do it for you Hardwired ...


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I don't have the code citation, but I know, from numerous other questions and personal experience, the following: The basic concept is not "Thou shalt have switched lights everywhere", but rather "Thou shalt have lights on when you need them everywhere". That can take a few forms: Switched lights with the switches in accessible (not too high or too low) ...


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The problem comes in with the type of fixture, a ballast requires a switch or local disconnecting means in the fixture depending on the type of construction. an Edison lamp (screw in) would be ok. Having a light on all the time actually is ok by code but some fixtures like fluorescents that have ballasts require a way to disconnect the power locally . I ...


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Here's the answer. It turns out there must be another junction box. I made an incorrect assumption that Light/Junction #1 is the main junction. It isn't. It appears to be wired like this: Breaker feeds some junction that I can't see which then feeds Outlet A and Light/Junction #1. So anytime the breaker is on, Outlet A is powered no matter what. Really ...


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Mounting a splicing wire connector turns it into a pumpkinterminal block We know that by definition, as per ZMVV.GuideInfo: Splicing wire connectors establish a connection between two or more conductors by means of mechanical pressure and are not intended to be permanently mounted. They are floating, such as a twist-on connector in an outlet box. , a ...


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What if the wires are mounted while the splices remain floating? The wires could be bent and fixed neatly as one might do when setting up a terminal block, but then instead of using a terminal block, use a splicing connector. The following products are made by Advanced Cable Ties. In order, these are anchor mount, mounting base, mounting hole cable tie, and ...


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It could be that Cable #2 (the 3-conductor cable) from Main light to Other light carries neutral and hot to Other light and to Wall switch. The red wire then brings switched hot back to Other and to Main lights. The only other mystery is the result that Cable #3 and Cable #4 both powered Outlet A. Supposing Outlet A is a duplex receptacle, are both of its ...


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