New answers tagged

0

NEMA 10-30 does not have ground. That is incorrect. It does have neutral. You should not be using 10-30 for anything at all - it was outlawed at the same time 2-prong sockets were outlawed, when grounding went in in the 60s. Except due to lobbying by the appliance industry, NEMA 10 got a reprieve for ranges and dryers ONLY, until it was banned for that ...


0

(from Australia) Not a complete answer but as I don't have 50 points I can't comment, hope that this is ok. It could be that the RCB is the issue. This happened to me some months back. It would stay loaded until any appliance or load was switched on in any of the circuits it covered, Then it would trip. I got a sparky in. He replaced the RCB after testing ...


0

This isn't a full answer but I hope can help. My perspective is from Australia so hopefully close enough. My place (built 1934, so I assume the old wiring is 50s or 60s) also has old red/black wiring in a few places. The practice then was to run the earth as a separate, bare (uninsulated) stranded wire. It seems to always have been close by the live and ...


0

Because New Zealand is harmonized to AU standards, which are based on old UK standards, not North American standards. (though AU uses North American junction box form-factors, and do not use the ungainly UK plugs.) Your wiring is: Live: Red (generally) Neutral: Black Ground: Yellow w/ green stripe... with green and bare also acceptable due to world ...


0

I am getting a voltage tester (70v-1000 vac) go off (chirps once) when it touches my arm. If I move it up and down my arm it will chirp every few inches. Is this normal? And no, I'm not sitting in an electric chair at the state pen. LOL This is the voltage tester. https://www.amazon.com/ALLOSUN-GK7-Non-Contact-Voltage-70-1000V/dp/B07N4D9KCL


0

It depends on what your charger requires! If it is a 240v charger hot-hot-ground yes you can use 10-30 or 10-50 they are not obsolete I just installed one recently for a 240v air compressor. (They don’t make a 40). The 50 with #8 wire is limited to a 40 amp breaker, most of us just bite the bullet and wire in #6 but since you have the 8 in place install a 10-...


-1

150A service into a home is ok. Considering your big appliances are ran from utility gas. Not often will you see a load close to what your main/sub breaker is rated for save for when appliances like hvac startup, and thats only for a few miliseconds. Even then breakers are spec'd to allow for the inrush current. What I notice with the panel is, firstly its a ...


1

I came across this while looking for something else. I know that it's an old discussion, but I wanted to leave this for anyone searching in the future. When I moved back into my house in '05, fortunately little brother, a recent electrician journeyman, was about. I had a couple of warm sockets. I'd a '67 or '68 house with aluminum wiring, which was done for ...


4

It seems like your plan will work to bring up to current code. Some details in communication can be missed, so here are the most relevant current (2020) NEC code sections that I think are relevant. When reading these sections keep in mind that in NEC terminology an "outlet" is any equipment connection point including hard wired connections, and a &...


0

As I understand your question you want to eliminate the switch control of the outlets, if not ignore. If it is wired as most three way switches are you can connect the three wires at each switch together then put a blank cover over the box. You can also connect the identified terminal to one of the travelers and do the same at the other end. Either way will ...


4

Nothing in Code requires outlets be a string. Code requires a "tree" topology, so you can have tee's anywhere you want, even right on top of each other. The only limitation is "box fill" re: number of wires and devices vs the box cubic inches. Better "spec grade" receptacles and switches ($3) and GFCI receptacles accept 2 ...


2

It's probably typical that nothing at all is done.. but you're right something should be done. Try a chase nipple: or a snap bushing: (photos from homedepot.com)


4

Easy / Fast: A corded electrical drill is used ensure power. I use a hole saw to drill a knockout in metal electrical fixtures. I start with a small hole so that the hole saw will stay on target. Ear and Eye protection must be used. In my experience it worth every penny to purchase a good hole saw set, along with ear and eye protection.


3

There's really no code that applies to low-voltage connections. You can generally run them where and how you like. The standards that do apply, in my opinion, are about workmanship. I'd be satisfied with a quality wire nut or push connector and having the cable secured to framing or whatever so the connections can't be subjected to tension.


6

Height is fine. While there's a lot of "developed convention" in putting them 16-18" above the floor, actual code is within 18" (?) of the wall in the floor to less than 5'6" (?) off the floor, without going and looking it up. So the precise numbers may differ, but the general idea is conveyed correctly here. Other than cost, the ...


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I have never seen any requirements as far as the minimum height of electrical outlets, they can even be installed on the floor. Routing your cables through junction boxes and pigtailing to the outlet above and to the next outlet is OK but remember that those junction boxes must always remain accessible so think twice about it if you ever plan on finishing ...


1

With help from many of you, I have completed installing a 22K Generac standby generator, powered by propane, and tested it. As noted above in my May 25 post, my service panel is a Siemens meter-combo unit, and the ensuing discussion resulted in the conclusion that my plan to use an ATS wasn't possible without extensive and expensive work to separate the ...


3

Edit for visibility - If you have two black wires, you aren't allowed by code to repurpose a black wire to a neutral. You get 120v from 240v by using one hot and a neutral. Circuits that only need 240v like an AC can be run using only hots, but if the appliance uses 120v and 240v like a range/stove then you need three wires + ground. So, unfortunately, the ...


2

Your untrained eye is doing OK. The 150 amp breaker is your main breaker and disconnect. The remaining breakers are listed as the maximum current they will allow to pass based on the wire size connected to them, not necessarily the equipment they're connected to. All the breaker are never used to full capacity at the same time so as long as the total usage ...


4

This is a great idea. It also: Eliminates the need for separate ground wires (assuming you use metal conduit) Allows for upgrades. Want to install a heavy-duty tool that needs 30A instead of 20A? No problem - just add (or replace) wires in the conduit. Keep in mind that there are limits to conduit, such that if you hit a certain limit (I think 4 circuits, ...


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TL;DR Probably OK, but need to calculate to be sure In general, most breakers in a panel are either only used most of the time at a small fraction of capacity (e.g., 15A and 20A circuits that most of the time have at most a few Amps in use) or not concurrently (e.g., heat vs. air conditioning) or only for short periods of time (e.g., garbage disposal). In ...


2

Most likely what you have is a "constant current" type LED driver, and it is of the low cost "linear power supply" variety, very common in the type of fixture you describe. One of their down sides is lower efficiency, meaning they create heat and in a "trapped" air flow situation like a bathroom, may suffer from decreased life ...


1

If there is no hot line going to the pool light, there is no electrocution danger there, however there is no pool light either. (I would disconnect the Neutral too, just in case). Are the string lights LED by chance? That could explain why adding them made the pool light circuit trip. The pool light circuit had a small amount of leakage to ground, as in ...


0

Bad switch - my ceiling fan has chain pull switches. One went bad, easy replacement from hardware store.


32

Consider buying a step drill bit for drilling clean holes in thin materials. Step drills look like this: The magic happens because they increase the size of the hole gradually, and each previous step holds the work steady as the next step cuts the material. You can find various demos on youtube, but basically if you've ever tried drilling a sheet material ...


0

I have a heater on the floor below the fan which starts the ceiling fan spinning slowly. After turning off the heater and stopping the blades they did not spin again. Quite a relief!


6

7/8". There are some connectors labelled 3/8" such as an Halex 05103B, the 3/8" in that describes the nominal size of the cable or flex being fitted to the connector. If you click the link the catalog page show in misc notes that it fits 1/2" knockout. The nominal description of knockout size corresponds to raceway sizes the hole is cut ...


10

If you have an electrician buddy borrow his knockout punch for the size you need, probably for 1/2". If not you probably can rent one. They typically come in sets. You will need to drill a how maybe 3/8" depending on the punch set. You then place the bolt through the die, then place the bolt through the hole you drilled, then thread the punch on ...


2

If the panel labeling is silent on doubling ground wires, then Accessory ground bar. Done & dusted! The panel labeling will state a number of ground bar model numbers that will directly fit the panel (i.e. the sites are planned into the panel and the holes are pre-drilled). In fact anyone's ground bar would suffice, but may require some drill & tap ...


20

That's illegal, and always was illegal You can't use 10/2 + ground cable for a washer-dryer. You never could. IN 1996 (25 years ago) they banned the NEMA 10-30 connector. Your combo unit can easily be wired NEMA 14 with a 4-prong plug, and the conversion instructions are in the manual. In 1966 (55 years ago) they effectively banned using 10/3 without ...


0

The problems with both AL & CU-clad AL were primarily caused by the coefficient of expansion of AL wire. When current flows through wire an it's terminals, heat is produced. Because of the high coefficient of expansion of AL wire, terminals are stressed when the conductor in the terminal expands. After sufficient number of expansions, the terminal ...


21

You didn't specify the model number but this is likely similar (from: https://www.justanswer.com/appliance/7j73z-need-ge-stacked-washer-dryer-dryer-timer-motor-wiring-hookup.html) You'll note that the washer is powered from L-2/N and the dryer is powered from L-1/L-2. It's clear that you likely have a missing or bad N connection and using the 10/2 is ...


0

Sometimes you just get a wall like that. I have similar spot in my house, where detector beeps over several foot of wall. Electrician just laughed at it, but didn't suggest any fixes, so it is probably ok. It may be connected to moisture, grounding wires grounding in wall itself, induction from cables and so on. If you have a neon voltage probe (the "...


1

Thx for the help. I ended up using a multimeter and discovering that only one of the two sets of wires carried power so i used that for the gfci than carried the rest of the power over to the switch with the second 120V wire. It all works


2

You are at the crux of the problem. The whole shebang would float at some indeterminate voltage above natural earth ground. There would be 240V of spread: neutral would be at X volts, phase L1 would be X-120, and phase L2 at X+120. What's more, you're imagining a 480V offset, which might happen with leakage inside a 480V transformer found inside an ...


2

Actual example. Some idiot that somehow got his electrical license did some work on a house, and removed the connection to the grounding electrodes, putting a clamp onto a water pipe, ignoring the fact that the waterline into the house was plastic, even though the hunk near the box was copper. A while later, a nearby lightning strike caused an occupant to ...


26

What could possibly go wrong? If the ground wire is bare copper, you massively increased the risk of a ground fault, which can kill somebody or burn the house down. If the ground wire has a smaller cross-section, it will not be protected by the breaker from overheating and can burn the house down. Somebody working on the system may falsely believe the ...


1

For the duplex receptacle: With black/red/white you likely had either: 1/2 switched or MWBC split. Either way, you would have had hot (but not neutral) tab removed. The problem is that a standard duplex GFCI receptacle doesn't have that "split" capability. So we need to first figure out what is going on: With the breaker off, open up (uncap) the ...


18

NEMA 10 connectors are ungrounded, 125/250V connectors which have been outlawed since 1966 when grounding came in. Because of appliance industry lobbying, exception was made until 1996 for ranges and dryers only. So we are dealing with really ancient codes here. The exception required that electrical wiring be 4-wire as soon as old stocks of ungrounded ...


5

As FreeMan notes, this is 2 AWG aluminum wire. 2 AWG is allowed 90A, per Table 310.15(B)(16). There's a rumor running around that #2 is good to 100A. That is false, as is plainly evident by the table above. However, the place that falsehood comes from is NEC 310.15(B)(7) -- a whole service to a dwelling are granted an 83% favorable derate -- so a 100A ...


10

NEMA 10 isn't included, because you are not supposed to design any new equipment using it! NEMA 10 was for 125V/250V ungrounded receptacles. Except allowed to combine ground with neutral in certain circumstances. In general, all 125V, 250V or 125V/250V equipment and wiring is now supposed to be grounded, and has been for many years. That includes 125V NEMA 1....


3

Aside from manassehkatz's warning (something which is present on my cottage, or was; I assume they fixed it)... By the way, one trick you can do is to back-feed with a breaker. The breaker has to be tied down if you do (so it can't come off in your hand). So for instance you can jumper the panel's 2 main lugs to each other and then back-feed into 1 pole of ...


0

Matthias Wandel did this by putting a wooden block over the end of the switch, and putting a spring between the block and the switch. But I don't recommend doing this. Every time you turn it off this way, the Ring camera stops working for a few minutes while it reboots.


1

After heating up the oven my GE Adora range was cutting out to an error code. About a month later other electrical issues appeared in the house, not same circuit (flickering lights, bathroom fan slower, etc.). Turns out the wiring at the pole had an issue. After that was repairs I had no issues with the oven. In summary, the oven was drawing current and ...


15

You have ground being used as neutral. That is a serious code violation and can cause a number of dangerous problems. In the old days, the only real solution would be to run a new cable. Fortunately, today we have smart switches to the rescue! Look for a smart switch that has 3-way operation but that only needs one traveler between the switches. That can be ...


10

I'm assuming by drain, you mean neutral. Ground wires can not be used as any other conductor, repurposed. If its green insulated or bare copper, then it must be used as a ground and only as a ground.


6

Based on your panel pic, it looks like you've got 2 AWG AL wire (green box) of type XLPE. However, the writing is a bit worn, so it's hard to tell for sure. If I'm wrong, I'm sure one of the electricians will be by shortly to let me know. I believe that this is sufficient and appropriate for a 100A breaker, so you should be good to go there. Again, one of ...


1

In the Netherlands we use something we call a "kookgroep" using a perilex connector like: It uses a 5 pin connector, but it is a combination of two groups (two Life/Neutral) pairs and a ground. It is possible that both life wires are from different phases. Unfortunately there is no standard connection scheme so lots of people struggle with it. By ...


3

To add a bit of info, there’s absolutely no harm in using that #10 wire directly to a 20A receptacle. Or even a 15A for that matter. As long as you downsize the breakers. The wire will just be oversized which is perfectly fine. The breaker’s primary function is to protect the wire. So, a 20A breaker with #10 is overly protected. Your proposed plan will be ...


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