New answers tagged

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Multiple circuits in a box is fine. All of the ground wires should be tied together with a pigtail to the metal box. It's not required to ground the switches if the box is metal but I usually do it anyway. Do not tie the neutrals from different circuits together. If you're going to replace a switch with a timer, be sure you have enough room behind it. Some ...


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You can have multiple circuits in one box. But you have to: Keep all matching hots, switched hots and neutrals of any circuit together Keep all neutrals of different circuits separate (nobody would ever think, I hope, of combining hots of different circuits - and neutrals should not be any different (except MWBC...)) Connect all grounds together So it ...


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A meter reading the green sounds fishy to me. In an older building the blades inside the receptacle become loose. As they get loose they start heating up and get looser causing arcing and sometimes fires. The problem can be made worse with large loads like electric heaters, portable cooking equipment, curling irons and hair dryers all require maximum current ...


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NEC 110.2 says that equipment must be "approved". This means by the local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ, the town electrical inspector). It is the policy of essentially every electrical inspector to rubber-stamp any fixture which is listed by Underwriter's Laboratories (UL) or other Nationally Recognized Testing Lab (NRTL). Note that CE* is not a ...


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To answer your question, yes, connect the hot leads to the hot #12 and the white leads to the white #12 neutral, wiring all the led lights in parallel. You can group or pigtail them. You need to check the load in the bedroom to make sure you don't overload the circuit but led lights have such low wattage my guess is you'll be ok. Where did you buy the ...


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I have a range that needs 10/3 wiring w/ ground... My question is can I just run an additional 10/2 wire... Or do I need to run a new 10/3 wire electrically speaking yes it is possible to run a just a new 10/2 wire and only use the black (or white) as the other hot but in order to do so that new hot wire would have to go onto a breaker on the opposite side ...


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Splittng a circuit across two cables is simply not an option. It cannot be done, and there are big reasons for that, and those reasons are much more critical on high-current devices. This isn't low voltage DC power: this is AC and a whole lot of it. Usually, in situations like this, the barrier is that the cable is too buried in finished walls to ...


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The gap you are seeing is well within the normal limits of adjustment for standard yokes (the metal thing the screws go through). You just tightened down the yoke screws and let them land where they may. You'll need to back them off, shift the outlet and switch around as needed, and repeatedly try the plate until it lines up. If the yokes don't give ...


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AFCI is a safety device that is designed to protect circuits from setting your house on fire. You are talking about defeating a safety system because a) it's annoying and b) you have no earthly idea what to do about it. Let's fix b). It is called an Arc Fault Circuit Interruptor "Circuit interruptor" is the technical term for "be annoying". "Arc Fault" ...


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There are "wireless" doorbells that can actually take power from the low voltage doorbell wiring, though you may need to adjust the wiring to make it a power delivery circuit instead of a "short-circuit to ring" circuit. These have the advantage that you don't have to worry about charging the battery every so often.


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This is 240V split-phase, so both hots are equivalent. The white wire should be remarked one of the 8 legal hot colors, since it is not a neutral. If I were wiring this in conduit, with the choice of any of 8 colors, I would use black and black because the hots are interchangeable; no need to distinguish hots from each other. This thermostat is single ...


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You can normally connect 2 ovens on 1 breaker per the NEC but the manufacturer instructions over ride the NEC per 110.4.B , listed or labeled equipment shall be installed in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling. This means you have to follow the manufacturers instructions. I agree with @JReaf that the control cycling of the ...


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Don‘t tear the wires out Some newer doorbells are going wireless. But this is not a universal trend. Better doorbells are actually wired, because they do things that take power. They are lighted (like, the button glows), they have cameras or WiFi, motion sensors, microphones, speakers, etc. Those things are not possible on battery. Also, the ...


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To power the wired doorbell, there will be a transformer that converts the house voltage to a lower voltage. To decomission the wiring you'll have to find that transformer and remove it. The other option would be to cap them off and leave them inside the box of the new doorbell. That lets you or a future homeowner use them in the future.


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Those wires going to your doorbell button hook up to a transformer somewhere. Maybe it's behind your chime, or maybe its in the attic, but it's there somewhere. Find the transformer and completely disconnect it (but leave it there in case anyone wants to hook it up again), and then you can bury the doorbell wires in the wall. Again, try to make the wires ...


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If a group of wires, together, are splitting power from one circuit, such that they together could not exceed the breaker rating without a trip -- then those wires together count as 1 wire for this purpose. Let's suppose you have box A and box B. Supply comes in to box A. B has a GFCI deadfront and a bunch of switches, protected by the GFCI. Supply hot ...


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I'm not going to pretend to be a code expert, but I thought I would post this as my interpretation. If wires in a conduit are on one circuit then the total power (and heat generating ability) of the wires will be limited to 20A (assuming 20A circuits). If you have wires from 3 circuits, you could have up to 60A of power flowing through that same run of ...


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Start out by checking the connections on switch B, especially the travelers which hopefully will be marked in yellow. If all is good, replace the switch. Since you've been having the problem for years, replace both switches, they are pretty inexpensive. Take a picture of the back of the switches before unhooking any wires. There is no standard for the ...


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Replace switch B. Sounds like something broke inside the switch.


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Yes, you can do this. The 14/2, with a ground, would be run into your 3 gang box. The black hot would be connected to the three black dimmer switch wires using a wire nut or appropriate connector. Then the load wires from the switches would be hooked up to the appropriate black wires from the lights. The white wires, neutrals,from the lights would all be ...


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It should be safe as long as you unplug the microwave oven when not in use (or use a switched outlet). The reason for this is that there is usually much more dust and lint inside a walk-in closet than there is in a kitchen. All the highly inflammable material gets deposited and compacted by the forced cooling air circulation (virtually every MW as a fan) ...


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Note that colors here are the usual colors for US cables. If you are in another country, colors may vary. In addition, if you are using conduit then you can use different colors (but still use white for neutral): Everything everywhere gets ground (green or bare). All grounds are connected, never switched, so ignored for this description. From circuit ...


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Use a mounting block with a built-in box The simplest solution to this problem is to use a siding mounting block with a builtin pancake box, such as an Arlington 8141 (the correct part number depends on the lap depth of your siding, the 8141 is what's used with a 1/2" lap) or equivalent.


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Above 8’ it would be ok but below that 1/2” Sheetrock or wood panels, plywood , osb ect.


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Aside from what else has been said, the #1 practical priority is to staple the cables so that if cables are yanked on, the staples catch the force and it damages the cable there. You don't want it yanking it out of wherever it's connected, because that could cause all sorts of additional problems in places that are harder to access.


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You can run NM cable (the official term for Romex, which is a brand name) in a crawl space either ALONG the SIDES of the floor joists, or THROUGH them (i.e. fed through drilled holes). But you cannot just staple it TO the bottom of the joists. Since that may not be an option here, the next choice is to nail small "runner" boards to the bottoms of the joists, ...


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It's definitely wrong, the danger lies in getting tangled in it and pulling out connections in whatever boxes the runs go to. You can probably bet that if this is what you can see it's not secure anywhere else. Could also be an issue if you get any water down there as that is not rated for that. I'm not 100% on code in a crawlspaces but I think it's ...


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There should be no problem assuming that you leave adequate clearance around the unit. Any appliance becomes a fire risk if there's flammable junk piled against it. Also be diligent about vacuuming up lint and dust. The microwave's cooling fan will draw in more debris in a clothes closet than it probably would in a kitchen. You might blow it out ...


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I don't know whether it's ok or not from a code perspective, but I wouldn't do it. If I were you I would install access points and power them with POE. You'll get much better and more reliable wifi. It will be a little more expensive especially if you already own the extenders, but would definitely be cheaper if you have to run new circuits.


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Note that in some areas (in New Zealand, for example), your emergency lighting and signage needs to be regularly tested. Typically by disconnecting the power to those circuits for e.g. 2 hours. Do you want your networking to fall over every few months when the tests happen? This looks like conduit; you may be able to pull more wires for another circuit. ...


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You've already identified switched-hot. The old lamp would have needed it, of course. The old lamp would have also needed neutral, and you've identified one of those. Lamps generally do not want/need always-hot, but if there are 2 or more cables in a lamp box, fair chance always-hot is in there. Since the lamp doesn't tap it, it's most likely that ...


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The short answer is yes you can, the easiest way is first to see if all the lights are on 1 breaker (normal wiring) It is possible they could be on 2 or 3 different circuits but again you could still do it with 1 switch (3 phase and some wires). Most basements or all I have worked on are fed from 1 or 2 circuits. Identifying the circuits is the first step. ...


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Trying to edit I deleted oops,, It depends on the occupancy. Some require dedicated circuits but if the router could be classified as part of the critical equipment it would be allowed even in a hospital. Emergency lighting cannot have thermal overloads that many lights do have but the router may be able to be added, for example I worked in a hospital as a ...


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did they wire the receptacles in series or parallel? if in series all it takes is one to fail and rest will stop or sounds like in this case the wire failed somewhere in between. if you have power at breaker and nothing at outlet definitely a broken wire either the hot leg or neutral


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If you only had 2 wires at the fan fixture I would look for a open neutral. This is quite common and those testers get confused sometimes. The most common source of an open neutral would be at a back stabbed outlet that was used in a daisy chain. The fault will normally be at the last working outlet or the first non working one in that chain. It is possible ...


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If I understand correctly: This was a week ago today and now nothing on this circuit will work! everything was working fine up until this morning that would seem to indicate that none of the wiring you did was "really messed up" because if so, the problems would have started as soon as you installed the fan. **Please confirm that the fan, light, ...


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I would access the fan wires again, and using volt meter, check from black to ground and white to ground, if you have 120v from white to ground that is your hot leg, now if black and white show 120v to ground I can only assume that one is a traveler leg since you have multi switches that can turn lights on and off from either side of the room


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In most cases of getting a "bzzz pop" on a circuit breaker there is a 98% chance you have a direct short to ground and if this happens once you shouldn't keep trying. The only thing it does is cause further damage to your electrical system. The first thing I would do is to turn very switch to the off position and unplug every piece of equipment from the ...


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It is probably safe, but I don't believe that you need to remove the screws. If you loosen the left screw on the L-bracket (the screw into the wall), it appears that the smaller piece with the keyhole will slide up. Before I moved anything, I would take a step-stool, a flashlight, and a mirror, and see if I could see down the crack in the back. Maybe you ...


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My house was either hit by lightning or lightning struck very close by. It was the loudest explosion I have ever heard in my life. It was then pitch black and all power was out in the area. It is late summer. Downstairs some items on the mantle were knocked to the floor. The fireplace was blazing and it must have been 90 degrees downstairs. The ...


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While I appreciate the answers posted so far, the more comprehensive of the two did not include any references. Granted, it's hard to point to a reference that says something isn't required. But, I was hoping for some kind of citation. So, I went looking for one. I believe I've finally found the applicable requirements, in the National Electrical Code (NFPA ...


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This happens a lot with GFCIs A person tries to replace a plain receptacle with a GFCI, but they have a problem. The GFCI only has 2 screws, but they have 3 or more wires. Then, they see 2 more screws (under the warning tape) marked LOAD. They think "LOAD must surely relate to my problem*" (no). And then they kind of invent a theory (no) and roll with ...


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It sounds like a led problem to me also, although LED’s draw very little current arcing on the circuit can cause other lights on the same branch circuit to have problems. I would check the connections at that first fixture, worst case swap the lamp from the first and the 2nd or 3rd fixture a lamp with a problem might cause problems similar to bad connections....


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With a dealer being THAT uncooperative, my 1st recommendation is give someone else your business. Sounds like they are trying to scam you. I would trust the manufacturer spec if you cannot get a real answer from your local building code officials.


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NEMA 6-15 and you're done Outlets aren't that expensive. Simply fit the correct one. The third one. If your wiring is 12 AWG or larger copper and your breaker is 20A, you can fit a NEMA 6-20 instead. Now, noting this thing is dual voltage, the right way to deal with that is have it have a removable inlet (the way a PC does) that takes an IEC ...


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No, you can't. That ground wire isn't nearly big enough! You are allowed to retrofit just a ground, however it has to go back to the panel to non-flexible metal conduit or AC cable that goes all the way back to the panel to another appliance whose ground wire is at least 10AWG all the way back to the panel to the Grounding Electrode system of that ...


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If I understand correctly, you have a GFCI device on the end of a power cord attached to a fan - i.e., the GFCI was provided with the appliance and is not built in to the building. Assuming that is the case, there are two possibilities: Failure of the GFCI A ground fault in the device If the GFCI has failed - and they can fail - then replacement makes ...


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The manufacturer came back to me as follows: Hello, Thank you for reaching out to our support team. Unfortunately, there is not a programmable way to do this. The person in the video has modified his outlet to be able to have the light power on as soon as it is plugged into the outlet. Please feel free to reach out to us if you have any ...


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For older appliances and such, pre-electronics, it's only a safety issue and even then, only under the worst case scenarios. The National Electric Code is all about those worst case scenarios however, hence the requirement. I'm not minimizing the safety aspect, I'm just saying that people survived for a LONG time with 2 prong outlets. That said, the OTHER ...


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So if: 1) power goes into 3 way switch 2) switch legs go to other 3 way switch 3) combined switch leg which powers lights now goes into 2 dimmers 4) each dimmer feeds a wire to a different set of lights It can work. An easier thing might just be to get a bunch of philips hue bulbs and program and control them with home automation software - with an added ...


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