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The advice by Tim does not sound correct. For as long as I've been performing electrical service if you create a subpanel feed from your main service panel, the subpanel is supplied by 4 wires, two hot, one neutral and the other a ground. An insulated neutral must also be separate from the ground bar at the subpanel and if installed in a separate building ...


4

You don't need a breaker. You need a disconnect switch. You can just fit one of those, and call it a day. However in most cases, the cheapest way to get a disconnect switch is to get a panel with a main breaker, since breakers are also switches. You don't care about the breaker part. You could add other functionality, like, say, GFCI, to this main ...


6

Some panels will allow you to backfeed a breaker. AIUI that requires a kit to bolt the backfed breaker in place. Not every panel permits this. Honestly, the BEST approach (and simplest - you don't need to order a kit to bolt in the breaker and figure out if the panel is listed for that use) is to return the sub-panel and pick up a main breaker panel, 100, ...


4

The panel itself can come with a shutoff breaker, however at the size you will want to install (larger than your current plans for sure) it will be oversized. That is fine as long as the feed wire is protected at the main panel with a 50A breaker. Other wise you can backfeed a breaker. You panel may have a designated position for such a breaker. That ...


1

Yeah, as Ed Beal discusses, the 3% isn't serious, but they like to encourage you to "bump" to sell fatter wire. When you calculate voltage drop, you should really use the practical load you expect to have realistically. I have a comparable cottage with no major electric appliances, and we're fat and happy with 30A@120V service. So I'd expect 10A @ 240V ...


2

3% and 5% are there in the form of Fine print notes. These are not enforceable. If your max demand (power used at 1 time) is 100 amps 1/0 will be fine. We would really need to do a load calculation to provide a real value but 270’ 1/0 aluminum is only 4.68% since you have gas cooking and water heater I would guess your demand will be below 60 amps and that ...


1

At the main service the grounding(bare wire) and grounded conductor (white wire/neutral) are together. ANY panel (aka sub panel) after the main panel is a sub panel and the grounded conductor (white wire/aka neutral) are not bonded and should be separated. Period! You have a floating ground condition and someone could get hurt and also the GFCI may never ...


10

It's a rating. Like tires. Go shopping for tires. Almost any tire these days is rated 112 mph. *You're allowed to drive 65 on those, it is saying don't exceed 112 mph*. It's the same with subpanels: The "100A" is a maximum rating. Do not exceed 100A. However, you certainly should exceed your feed-breaker size of 50A. Even if 50A panels existed, ...


2

50A is not a standard panel size, you will find a few more options if you search 60A. You can use a panel rated for higher than the feeder, the panel rating is the maximum current allowed. You may wan't to consider checking your wire size, the instructions for the last hot tub I installed specified #6 wire, most of the time #6 can be protected at 60A. (...


1

First problem is that you have multiple grounds, because your main panel is grounded and now you've bonded grounds in your subpanel. This is illegal and not safe. As for your GFI's as long as your box the device is in has continuity to ground, which is done through the bonding screw in the subpanel you should be fine. Someone mentioned grounding the panel ...


3

Using a larger sub panel will not be a problem but the breaker must stay a 50 AMP in the main panel. You can utilize the 50 Amp breaker in the hot tub panel as a connection point for the new wire run or just use that junction as a splice point. If you do that, I don't think you can double lug the wires and would have to use split-bolt connectors (buy a lot ...


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Just wire it up. There is no problem using a sub panel that can take more current than you will ever feed it. Points to note: The cable to your hot tub will be rated for 50A (not 100A); therefore you must not upgrade the breaker in your main panel to 100A. It would be sensible to add a note near the main panel that the cable is only rated for 50A, so not ...


1

Since it's all conduit, you should be able to stuff a ground wire down it, by hook or by crook Since we're feeding a 100A panel via conduit, getting a ground in there isn't as hard as it sounds. You only need about 75-80' of 8AWG bare stranded copper for this, and should be able to pull it through by turning off the feeder in the main panel, unhooking it ...


7

Panel issues First, manasshkatz correctly spotted the alien breaker second from bottom on the right side. The lower left breaker is a Siemens QP. Those alien breakers have gotta go. You need "Westinghouse" (read: Cutler Hammer/Eaton) BR/C family, commonly known as BR. The 30A Siemens is a mystery. There's almost no legitimate use for a 30A 1-pole breaker....


8

A GFCI breaker does not know or care what happens upstream (elsewhere in the subpanel or back at the main panel. All that matters is that neutral and hot are connected to it properly so that it can detect the difference between them. If there is a ground wire going to the protected device then that ground must be separate from neutral until sometime past the ...


1

I generally prefer to do property improvements just once in my lifetime. So I'd bury a pair of generously sized schedule 80 pipes below the frostline (using sched 80 instead of normal sched 40 means I can drive heavy vehicles over them - I have a 900+ lb garden tractor), I'd run them in a dead straight line, and I'd put pull strings in them so I could run ...


39

Why bury a cable when you can be future-proof? The primary issue with direct buried cables is that you have to dig them up in order to upgrade them, a costly proposition. Hence, it's a far better choice to spend the money to lay a couple of fat PVC conduits now and then pull wires through them, than to have to dig things up 5 years down the road because ...


4

If you go small - a single 20A multiwire branch circuit - you don't have to put a subpanel in at the shed. You will still want a disconnect, but they are cheap. At 100', 12/3 UF would do it. But then again, if you spend a few extra bucks, you could bury 8/3 UF instead of 12/3, and use it for that 20A multiwire branch circuit now, and have an easy ...


25

I'm going to be a bit contrarian and say 10/3 UF. It's pricier and overkill for your existing setup, but here's why it could be worth doing it now. A single 12/2 means you only get 20 amps at your shed. Period. Next year, you buy some power tools and you start taxing your 20 amp. If the breaker pops, you get to walk back to your main panel. Pop it multiple ...


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I've built several such sheds, and a #12 UF-B (moisture and UV light resistant) cable (usually gray) is appropriate on a 20A breaker (or smaller). Depending on where you are it may need to be buried to a particular depth. Conduit is a good idea and may reduce the depth requirement. Otherwise, use your best judgement to prevent damage in the future. Because ...


2

Depends, are we dealing with NEC, or Harper (that's me)'s Law? NEC: The screws attaching the ground bar to the panel are fine if they are 32 thread pitch or finer (e.g. 8-32, 10-32, etc.) I would also run a ground wire with the thickest wire you have on hand.


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They should be properly linked. Do not rely on the panel providing a reliable connection.


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Big enough subpanel That's a 20-space panel. The 40 number is baloney. I'm glad you're getting a good size panel though However, that panel has HOM's super-cheap 100A busing, which forecloses any possibility of going 125A at another time. A panel that size should have 150A+ busing, man, Homeline lives up to its name. Consider also CH, BR, or Siemens. I ...


4

Never intentionally overload wires. It can have very serious unintended consequences. Two possibilities. You tripped a breaker, but it's not where you think it is. So, you shut off your "main panel's" main breaker, and your garage didn't trip. That tells you something. It means if you overloaded the garage circuit (say, running a saw and dust ...


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You don't need to provision 70A to your RV box RV receptacles have standard loads, based on the largest capacity receptacle present at a RV site, as given in NEC 551.73(A): (A) Basis of Calculations. Electrical services and feeders shall be calculated on the basis of not less than 12,000 volt-amperes per site equipped with 50-ampere, 208Y/120 or 120/...


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First you don’t add the amperage totals that way. A single RV has a load requirement by code I think it is article 551 but this is an old code book , 9600va at 240v is the required RV supply for a 50 amp 240v service. A single unit requires 100% . Yes I have had a larger feed on a large RV with dual ac’s , after downsizing I am back o a 30 amp 120v (single ...


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