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3

Neutral needs to go to the neutral bar. The purpose of neutral is to be the normal path for return current which flows as part of the circuit's operation. As such, it can only go to the neutral bar, since only that is rated to handle that current continuously and on a routine basis. Safety ground certainly can't do that. Think about it, that bonding screw ...


1

Those two 50A single breakers need to be handle-tied, or replaced with a 50A 2-pole breaker. You can't have two singles on a 240V load like that. The empty breaker space at bottom left should be filled with a proper UL-listed thing. They make blank filler plates, but I find them flimsy and expensive. I just use actual breakers, a CH120 is around $5. (1) ...


4

You can do it any way you want. I would run several EMT short conduits. What I would do, however, is run 3-4 short EMT conduits between the 2 panels. "Gee, that would require learning a new craft and buying $6 worth of fittings, why would I do that?" The EMT conduit takes care of all grounding. No ground wires at all needed. It makes it EASY to ...


8

If you use cable, you are limited to the 60°C rating, so 6/3 isn't big enough for 60A - you'd have to go with 4/3 If you use conduit, and the terminations are rated for 75C, 6 (THHN) is fine. Also, if you use metal conduit, you don't need a grounding wire. The metal conduit is the grounding conductor. Since it's less than 24 inches long, (a "nipple"...


2

Assuming you are in the US and subject to NEC, 10 gauge copper is strictly limited to 30A. So, no. I don't think 8 gauge is big enough, either, unless it's THWN in conduit and the connections at both ends are rated for 75C. The breaker protects the wire, so you can't play games with sizing the wire for 37.5A. Given it's a heater, you need to provision for ...


4

The wall isn't enough, you need a conduit there What you're missing is that you can't have loose wires outside of a recognized Chapter 3 wiring method (i.e. cable, conduit, or some other sort of raceway), and "wires loose in a wall" isn't a wiring method that the NEC provides for. So, you need to run a short length of conduit between the LB and the ...


3

No, you can’t clamp individual wires like that. You shouldn’t be in a position to clamp individual wires to begin with. You should be feeding the panel with wires in conduit or cable. You shouldn’t be running individual wires unprotected.


1

That cable's absolutely worthless to you in this situation... First off, that cable's worthless for what you need it to do, as NEC 338.12 point 2 says that type SER (and SEU for that matter, not to be confused with USE) cables cannot be run underground, conduit or no conduit: 338.12 Uses Not Permitted. (A) Service-Entrance Cable. Service-entrance cable (SE)...


0

Can I lay the cable direct-burial, or does it need a conduit? That depends on the specifics of the cable. There are, in general, three types of cable: Cable that can be direct buried. Cable that can be run through conduit outdoors but can't be direct buried. (To be honest, I am not 100% certain that there are "Big cables like #2 Al, OK for outdoors/...


0

Deciding the max size of a sub panel is about how much you can load the main panel, and you didn't provide any of that information. So for example you can have a 200A sub panel, but not off of a 100A main panel. Determining the maximum load you can have is NOT counting the breakers and their ratings, you have to know that actual loads connected to them. ...


4

I need to say this: Be very wary of running to a particular wiring method merely because you are familiar and comfortable with it. Consider what you are wiring and where, and be willing to expand your skill set. An example is you are trying out the idea of conduit, but want to stay with familiar NM cable. Most novices think this at first. But this gives a ...


4

Grounding Since the garage is detached yes a grounding rod is required. Last the ground wire from the rod is connected to the grounding buss and the metal frame of the box / the building. The grounded or neutral conductor is isolated from ground an insulated buss is normally available in a main lug panel or a main breaker panel, if the bonding screw or ...


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