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2

Yes, a movable building can be socketed like an RV. Note that NM cable is not rated for use outdoors. I would expect to see UF cable if cost is no object, otherwise one or another aluminum feeder. The sub panel mostly looks OK, notwithstanding any GFCI or AFCI requirements. Except that a main lug appears to have 2 wires on it, which is not allowed. That ...


1

You have plenty of feeder space, don't worry Calculating the arcade cabinets and TVs at 180VA/unit (the miscellaneous receptacles number from NEC 220.14(L), which isn't too far off for arcade cabinets from the quick Google search I did, and a pretty generous allowance for modern LCD TVs) and adding 1500VA for the concession machines gives us 6900VA of plug ...


2

There are 2 separate questions that need to be split off. It's very similar to the posted speed limits on a road vs. the speed rating on your tires. The size of the feeder supplying the sub panel. This needs to correspond to the actual or likely usage you will have at the sub panel. For instance if you have a 12,000 VA of EV charger and 3600 VA of other ...


0

2/0 can handle 150 amps when less than 200 feet. I hate to run at max and considering conductor count, underground and long length, I like your decision to use 125 amps. I am not sure where you are getting the 2/0,2/0,1,4 feeder wire because the new wire is 2/0,2/0,2/0,1. Considering your wire sizing and application, there is nothing wrong with the old wire ...


2

Absolutely not! And hot tub wiring is nothing to fool around with! Anytime you have water and electricity near each other, you create a potential killer. This is the worst possible place to cut corners on the grounding. The Electrical Code specifically forbids an ungrounded feed to a hot tub. It is possible that your 3-wire run to the old hot tub is ...


0

Your idea is no-go. You seem to understand the importance of keeping neutrals separate. Well, the same applies to hots. Anytime hot wires are cross-connected you are inviting all sorts of problems. Also I don't think you realize the hot wires are on 2 different phases (or possibly 3). Hooking them to each other would cause bang-boom! If that last paragraph ...


3

If you are limited by your landlord to 10 x 120V 20A circuits, and if the goal is isolation so you can safely work on the wiring in your space, you can achieve that by running the ten circuits through light switches. Say, 10 light switches installed in two 5-gang boxes. (Which is a lot more expensive than using 5 2-gang boxes, so it's up to you). This will ...


2

TL;DR No. Run a new cable (or conduit). Sorry, you can't do that. As I understand the question, you would end up with everything together on the bus and then split again to the circuits, which would be paralleling which is not allowed except in very limited circumstances (that absolutely don't apply here). For the "why" (aside from "because ...


1

Think again about wire First, seriously consider aluminum feeder. Some people are afraid of aluminum because of stuff they heard on the Internet: that was about small branch circuits (lighting, receptacles) and really, it was the copper connectors on receptacles and sockets not playing well with aluminum wire. As such, the lugs on subpanels are aluminum, ...


3

First, I would like you to consider using aluminum wiring instead of copper. The cost difference is staggering and there's no measurable disadvantage to using aluminum if it's installed properly. If you're dead set on copper, #3 THHN is fine. You'll need 1-1/4 SCH 80 PVC for areas exposed to damage. In particular, this is generally where the conduit exits ...


3

The metal strip is a bonding strip between your neutral bus and your ground bus. You'll notice it isn't connected to your neutral bus which is correct for a sub panel but unfortunately, the grounds are connected to the neutral bus. You should move the copper grounds from the neutral bus over to the existing ground bus.You can splice some copper wire if the ...


3

First of all, a dryer receptacle is rated 30 amps, not 40, so if it's on a 40 amp breaker, you're already in violation. If you truly have a 40 amp circuit (#8 copper wire minimum) the you're ok for the wires being on a 40 amp breaker but not the receptacle. If you have #10 copper on a 40 amp breaker then you are overfused. Either way, there is nothing wrong ...


-1

I think the OP is considering adding additional circuits to the panel via Romex. If so, yes you can just add a ground bar to the sub panel and you don't need to run a ground wire back to the main panel as the conduit serves as the equipment ground conductor.


0

Ok, first, let's get some terminology straight so we are talking the same language. There's a difference between grounding (or earthing) and bonding. The purpose of grounding is to provide a low impedance path for induced transient currents, such as lightning strikes, transformer faults and other electrical noise safely to the physical earth itself. The ...


6

A feeder is breaker and wiring that supplies a subpanel. A branch circuit is breaker and wiring that supplies various outlets, including receptacle outlets. "Outlets" does include hardwired loads, or as they like to call them, "utilization equipment". Wiring can be one or the other, not both. You cannot have outlets on a feeder. So no. ...


0

If wired the way you suggest the breaker would have to protect the outlet and the entire subpanel. The breaker and the outlet would have to match. There is no useful combination of breaker/outlet/subpanel that could work this way. You can't run say a 60A subpanel off a 60A breaker and put a 20A outlet on the feeder cable. If you use a 15A breaker and a 15A ...


1

If metal conduit is installed properly then it serves as the equipment grounding conductor, and an additional wire is not required. If you choose to run one it needs to be sized per NEC Table 250.122. Since you have no ground bar I would take a moment and verify that the panels were installed correctly and the bonding screws or straps are NOT installed in ...


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