New answers tagged

7

Think aluminum Since you are concerned about costs, I would try to nudge you off novices' preconceptions about copper vs aluminum wire. Novices tend to "stay with what they know" (having worked with copper in 15/20A branch circuits), and tend to believe all the scary stories about aluminum wiring in 15/20A branch circuits. This extrapolates into ...


5

Personally, I'd switch to EMT once inside and away from the need for limited cover depth for burial. Maintains the conduit-as-grounding-path. No need for a junction on the wires - just a transition in conduit types at a pull point or box. Resists rodent teeth. Easily bent. Borrow, rent or buy a bender. Read up a bit on using a bender. Fulfills the "...


4

Once inside convert to NM wire type in a junction box then no conduit will be needed. If you are using thhn dual rated you can use non metallic flexible conduit and stay with the same wire if you already have the wire. Non metallic is usually called smurf tubing because it is usually blue but comes in many colors if your walls will be closed it will be fine, ...


3

It's a mess in there alright What you have there is a right mess: No cable-clamps on either knockout What looks to be insufficient jacket protrusion into the box 20A circuits double-tapped off a 40A breaker that only supports one wire per lug A box that isn't connected to ground at all And neutrals and grounds slobbered together onto the same bar Your ...


2

Yes, you must move the neutrals with the hots, since they are part of the normal current loop. The logic which brought you to that idea, however, does apply to safety ground. The grounds can stay put where they are.


1

Can you come off the 50 amp feed for LED lights, yes. But what you have now is a non fusible disconnect, not a sub panel that can add another breaker for your LED lights. You can not just stick a 15 amp wire for lights under the 50 amp terminal and run your lights. (the wire would melt long before the breaker trips if there was an issue). You will need to ...


0

My pool runs off a double 15A breaker (240v), which includes the pump and pressurized pool cleaner (a Polaris). Salt pools use a powered chlorinator to generate chlorine and chlorinators change things a great deal. Some use less than 15A and are on a standard 120v plug. Some are direct wire and need as much as 30A and 240v. Pools can also have lighting, but ...


3

You'll need to move them to the subpanel You'll need to reroute the neutrals to the subpanel along with their associated hots (300.3(B) is the closest thing that applies); this has the advantage that the rerouted branch circuits can occupy a different conduit or cable from the feeder, though, easing derating. And that 4AWG wire is a size too small Your other ...


5

I think that is covered in NEC 300.3(B), All Conductors of the same circuit...shall be contained in the same raceway, auxiliary gutter, cable tray... The small portion of raceway where the neutral or hot nipples between panels would break the rule.


2

#4 copper is not legal for 100A. You would need #3 for that. Some people go around saying #4Cu/#2Al are good enough for 100A; there's a reason they think that, but they're wrong. Most electricians doing this work for themselves would actually do one of two things. For the full 100A, use #1 aluminum. You may have heard negative things about aluminum (you'...


0

Using copper THWN #4 is only good for 85A, which is not a standard size breaker. So you could if allowed by AHJ to upgrade to the next standard size, 90A. #8 copper ground is good for 100A. 3@#3 and 1@#8 would barely fit in 1" Sch40 PVC, you would need 1.25 for Sch80. A 6 space MLO panel would work, but risky that some future change would require more ...


7

Additional violations: The breakers are double-tapped, yet they are the older HOM breakers that are not listed for 2 wires per tap. If you can downgrade the 240V circuit to 15A or 20A receptacles (NEMA 6), you'd have a "Multi-wire branch circuit" with mixed 120V and 240V loads. That would be fine with a 20A 2-pole breaker at that point, and the ...


0

You'll need to take that panel back and get the correct transfer panel for your generator, or else you have dueling banjos bonding screws in your house The panel you purchased, unfortunately, isn't as useful as you think it is, because in Homeline, like most other breaker lines, you can't use their interlock kits with a bonded neutral generator like yours. ...


15

It is bad, more than a few violations here if I understand what is being fed. First violation no clamps /bushings coming into the panel 2 places. Next a 40 amp breaker feeding #12 possibly 14 awg wire 4 places 4 ground wires under 1 lug (I believe square D limits grounds to 2 wires) The neutral and ground issue would have been legal prior to 1999 If the ...


0

Yes, your plan of a subpanel makes the most sense. I would install it directly beneath the meter-main if it can fit there; otherwise immediately to its right, and I'd use EMT or Rigid metal conduit to connect them. These provide a valid grounding path and remove the need to run a ground wire. Do not use PVC no matter how much more comfortable you are with ...


1

The meter panel is a "rule of 6" panel. You're on the right track: interlocking that is probably impossible so re-arranging things is a good plan. The hard part is that there are so many valid ways of doing the job it may be difficult to choose. Your proposed idea is a good one. Not having done any demand calculations, but knowing that there isn't ...


3

If you have 3 insulated conductors and the messenger (support cable is aluminum) the messenger is normally the ground. Since you have a breaker inside the house you can enter the house and go through the attic. This may be both easier and a shorter run. Make sure you are clear of any window openings I think it is 3’ from them. You are well above code ...


2

You might as well go all the way with your subpanel upgrade There is absolutely no reason to put a dinky 10-space panel in your shed when you could get a 24-space or 30-space, 100 or 125A, main breaker panel for a minimal additional cost (the price differential we're looking at here pays for oh, a pizza or a few fancy cups of coffee, depending on where you ...


2

By having zero volts across the main it appears that 1 leg is open and the tools are back feeding so it appears there is 120v to ground on both. the zero was a clue. With no load the 240 v can be there there is probably moisture in the pipe and no load provided a path much like phantom voltage there is voltage but no current. No load and a path for voltage ...


5

You HAVE to do something here The "elephant in the room" is exactly what you discovered with the load calculation vis-a-vis your toaster heaters. You might want to ignore that elephant in the room, but since you want to do the EVSE upgrade "legit" with electricians and permits, you can't. No electrician will touch a panel as ...


9

Blame all those glorified toasters for the fact your service is already oversubscribed The source of your load calculation problem, quite bluntly, is the 19kW of electric resistance heat fitted to your house. Without it, our load calculation looks like the following: 1250 ft² * 3VA/ft² = 3750VA of general lighting/receptacle load from NEC 220.12/220.14(J), ...


4

That's a violation two ways. First, you can't parallel. Paralleling requires special equipment rated for paralleling on the supply end - this is for a bunch of reasons. It is also not allowed below a fairly large wire size. It's also uneconomical below an even larger wire size, and as a result, nobody makes paralleling equipment except for really huge ...


2

No, you can't do that. It is called paralleling, and it is prohibited except in very limited circumstances, which don't apply here. Think about it this way: 60A breaker in main panel 2 x 10/3 cable - doubled up. Sufficient to handle 60A (30A per cable). One hot wire in one cable breaks (loose connection, rats, whatever) Now you have: 60A on two parallel ...


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