New answers tagged

0

You'll have to bore the stud anyway, so I'd just nipple between the two panels Since you'll have to put a hole in the stud no matter what you do, I'd make that hole count as much as possible. How? Well, we start by scrapping the junction box and using a rigid metal conduit nipple between the adjacent sides of the two panels. This gets rid of a wire and a ...


1

Your ground wire qualifies as an EGC, use table 250.122, #8 is good for 100A. Conduit would not require nail plate protection (300.4(A)(2) ex.1). You can phase tape wires #4 and larger (200.6).


4

The subpanel is the way to go. But make it big! That is our #1 thing on panels - you want lots of spaces. Spaces are cheap, regrets because your panel is full are expensive. And that is a dinky little panel downstairs, you're not going to get much out of it, and I bet you're already double-stuffing that! Of course you want a small "box size", but that ...


5

Conduit is still your friend Even though running rigid EMT back to the main panel from the basement junction box is basically impractical with all those other cables in the way, it is still possible to stay in conduit all the way back to the panel. How? Flexible conduit, that's how! In particular, instead of running a cable (or cables) back to the panel, ...


2

I actually agree with someone in the comments. Running wires to a location and leaving them "live, but connected to nothing" is inappropriate. It would never be allowed in conduit; you are expected to either pull useless wires or put them to a use. In cable-in-wall construction, it is allowed to set unused cables due to the impracticability of accessing ...


4

You can rearrange your way out of your space shortage While the presence of the service barrier in your panel makes clear that those two bottom-left "spaces" are actually useless as they are on the wrong side of the barrier to be used for a branch circuit or feeder, all hope is not lost. With some rearranging of the existing breakers, and the replacement ...


3

TLDR Use THWN-2 #12 stranded wire. Use six wires: black white red blue gray and green/bare. Green/bare is ground for both circuits. At the ends (once they are installed) wrap the black/white/red with electrical tape to group them. Also wrap the blue/gray. On the lighting circuit, gray is neutral and blue is hot. No need for GFCI here. On the ...


0

I wired up my shed by putting the sub panel in the shed. Then I used a 30A 2P GFCI breaker in my house panel to feed that sub with #10 wire and have just 4 1-pole 15A breakers in that sub-panel. But all I am using in my shed is lights, a fan, 4 duplex receptacles and a small window A/C unit. The shed receptacles do need to be GFCI protected, so GFCI outlets ...


3

For a 30A breaker, honestly, you're fine at #10 wire. At that distance you don't need a wire size bump even for 120V loads. You said the word "cable" which means several individual wires in a sheath. That's not what you want, it's very difficult to pull through a conduit. Get individual wires, of type THHN (typically dual-labeled THWN-2). They will ...


1

Not gonna happen in this panel. This panel is far, far, far too small to support any kind of house. I sure hope whoever specced that panel really, really enjoyed that latté :) seriously they might've saved $10-20... If you don't mind power being out for a couple days, I would say fit a big panel here and up-cycle this one to be the garage subpanel. But I ...


Top 50 recent answers are included