New answers tagged

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Try to find the installation papers for the furnace and check the installation specs. Most blower motors are 4 speed. As far as the noise is concerned, I just replaced my 20 year old furnace with a new Goodman unit and it is very loud compared to the old unit. With most of the newer units today, you can not just reduce the blower speed since it may cause the ...


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Many of the very old houses had gravity style furnaces that utilized large registers and grills that offered very low resistance to the flow of air. Since there were no fans or blowers the delivery pipes and registers had to be very large. Depending on the size of your room/house update it may be a good idea to ask an HVAC company for a bid on a duct work ...


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I have installed quite a few registers like that but have never found them for sale. I have made them out of scraps of polypropylene, and UHMW. Most had to be shaped on 1 side a belt sander worked well for that holding the plastic with pliers. A few I could put in without shaping but not very many. Note if you drill the hole with a drill it needs to be ...


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"Old work" electrical boxes have similar tabs. I've never seen tabs like that sold separately, but the electric boxes are cheap enough that you could just buy a few for the screws and tabs they come with. Note the tab sticking up in the picture.


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It's similar to the reasoning behind using a filter for your AC units. You want to filter the air to prevent clogging up the coils and dirtying up the ducts. There is a lot of moisture in a bathroom and if you mix that up with dust and lint from towels you've got a combination of particles that will stick to the blades of the fan and also clog up the shaft ...


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The one place that I lived at where it had a heat pump did have a auto-stop on the compressor so that it would not run below freezing temps. If the temp dropped while the compressor was running, you would hear a hissing sound when it would shut itself off. I grew up with gas heat so there was always hot air blowing regardless of the outdoor temp. I ...


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Moving the condensers to the back of the garage is not a hard job but it takes time. The refrigerant is pumped into the condenser and the valves closed. The line set is cut and extended, the line set should be purged with nitrogen while being sweated back together normally a gross leak check under pressure. the line set is pulled to a vacuum recommended ...


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You may have the issue of a reduced flow rate as the system has been designed so that all the components “match”. This could cause poor performance or even overheating as the motor works harder. You could contact the manufacturer for their advice.


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Consider a lunos or a couple lunos. https://foursevenfive.com/lunos-e Do you humidify in the winter? If so you might want an ERV core. What are you hoping to achieve with the HRV/ERV? In a tight house an HRV runs all the time doing .33 ACH to remove VOC, moisture, etc.


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Choose your window based on your usage and what is important to you. Two things to consider, the cooling effect of course, and the noise and aesthetics. If the cooling is more important to you than the noise, then mount in the room where you spend the most time or would get the most comfort from it. Two units will give you much better coverage than one unit....


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I would probably use window 12 over number 1 because that is where the heat load is and the room is larger. 3 or 5 are both good options but I would use 3 because of the proximity for the discharge to blow towards the family room. If this were my place I would install mini splits , last week I saw an advertisement for a top brand 12k btu mini split with a ...


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I'd probably just get some angle iron. One piece parallel with the joist with the flange surface inline with the floor. Two lateral pieces parallel with the floor boards on the edge with the flange under the first piece. A final piece flange parallel with bottom surface of floor boards. This final pieces takes the loading, causes the previous two ...


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I'm not an HVAC guy so I don't know the CFM requirements but I believe that you could use 2x4 blocking that would leave over 3-1/2" depth should be plenty for air flow. Assuming that you are comfortable with that air flow, use 2x4 blocking with Simpson A35 clips and screws for attachment. You might be an extension on your power driver to reach the far side. ...


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One option to consider would be a set of pillars under each individual floor board, wedged or glued firmly in place, perhaps only secured on the bottom to allow for thermal movement. This concept extended within my grey matter to suggest a plank running across all the floor boards, but with holes across the span to provide for the airflow. The pillars ...


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Try the terminal between G and Y on your control board It looks like the C terminal on your control board is between the G and Y terminals, so I would try there as your first port of call, provided your thermostat cable has spare wires in it. (It's labeled /C in the bottom row of labels, and has a wire from what likely is your air conditioner compressor ...


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I believe that this document is for your unit and it indicates a 3amp fuse. Refer page 29, the trouble shooting section, top row, 5th column


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Having thermostats read slightly different values is quite normal. Mechanical thermostats almost always have an adjustment for this, some digital thermostats also have a calibration procedure but not all. When I set up temp a temp controllers I use ice point hot point (ice bath and boiling water) as my standard then adjust the controller. I would check ...


5

The zone board's gone bad Since upstairs is broken, yet downstairs is fine, and it's not a thermostat issue, I'd point the finger at the zone board having something wrong with it. Just to make sure, try pulling the upstairs thermostat and jumpering R to W on its base; if the heat doesn't come on, then something's dead with the W input for that zone.


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Yes, it would work. AC is a very simple concept. Take heat from one spot and put it somewhere else. if the somewhere else is another room, voila. this is actually what we end up doing a lot in server rooms, albeit with a way more expensiver unit "designed for it" but it is literally going to put the exact btu's removed from the cooled side into the heated ...


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OK, I have heard from multiple HVAC contractors that a general rule of thumb in a single trunk return, single trunk supply duct system, the RETURN:SUPPLY ratio should be 1:1 or greater. In other words, the return should always be at least as large as the supply. And preferably the return should be larger than the supply.


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Unconventional Alternative I see you have three problems, which you reasonably note may be related: Too much heat on the oven side Too little heat on the proofing side Too little humidity on the proofing side, due to heating the air While a heat pump will certainly solve your problem, I claim that it might actually be overkill. You see, a heat pump is ...


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You could try two small portable units in each direction, ideally each of them half of what you need, that way you will have two thermostats controlling the temperature in each room. So one unit would provide a fraction of the heating and cooling and is uncontrolled and less than what you need and the other unit the top up and is controlled by thermostats


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Thinking of using an AC system similar to Rimworld pc game? It is not going to work, efficiently. You are using R22 or R123a gas as a heating fluid? Thouse systems operating at an ambient temperatures around 45-55 C? And you wont be getting a thermal shut-off if you reached your desired heating temprature. So you wont be having any cooling nor ...


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Yes, this would work, but I caution you to consider that the hot side of the A/C could produce airborne water droplets full of bacteria. The typical through-window or through-wall air conditioner condenses water on the cool side and channels this water to a condensate tray on the hot side. The condenser fan typically has fan blades joined by an outer ring ...


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The idea is good and pretty much possible. Constructing it from off-the-shelf parts can be only a little tricky. First, I am yet to see an AC unit capable of humidifying a room (drying is trivial and will happen by itself, but is not what you need). The temperature controls are not necessarily on the cool side. Where I live, AC units are used more for ...


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A split A/C would avoid big openings in the wall (only a small hole for a pipe/tube is needed), is not expensive and would allow to freely position the elements. And can be extended by a 2nd or 3rd unit if needed resp. for redundancy.


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I think this is a clever idea, and doable with a pretty simple hack. If you locate an ordinary hardwired thermostat in the proofer room, and tie the heating terminals on the thermostat to the cooling terminals on the air conditioner, you should get what you're looking for. That will limit your options to units with terminals for an external thermostat. ...


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This isn't quite an "answer" but too long for a comment. Very interesting and energy efficient idea, very creative! OK, here goes my solution and I would welcome others (esp. the "big 3") to contribute and hopefully improve this suggestion. This would definitely be a "one off" approach. The bottom line parts are: 1) A thermostat (tstat) in the ...


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I'm not an expert to tell you whether this is actually a good idea, but an AC unit used for heating is called a heat pump. There are two differences between "a heat pump" and "an air conditioner": Heat pumps contain a reversing valve which reverses the operation so that what would usually be the cold side gets hot and the hot side cools instead. The ...


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This would work fine, go for it! The efficiency will come from the differences in temperatures between the heating and cooling elements and the room temperatures, the greater the difference the greater the efficiently (or effectiveness). An HVAC (Heating Ventilation, Air Conditioning) person or store will be able to help you with the calculations, even if ...


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It sounds like a good plan. but you're right that the controls will be regulating the heat in the wrong room. If you can find a unit that takes an external (to the unit) dumb thermostat, a thermostat could be positioned in the proofer room and used to command heat from the AC. Else you're going to need to have the air conditioner modified to meet your ...


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As @Ed Beal wrote, check the frame number so that the physical size is the same as well as other specs he mentioned. You can buy a motor of the same HP or more but not any less, so a 1/4 HP will work. As far as the fan blade, I would consult Trane for the exact replacement so the unit moves the same amount of condensing air. After market blades may not match ...


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I think NO. The C-wire connects to the transformers on the individual units. It's not like a common neutral or ground wire. You'll need to get a C-wire to both furnaces as there is no real electrical connection between the two on the low voltage side. There might be other solutions that the "big three" might be able to come up with, but I think your stuck ...


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Per reading more on this model of furnace on the internet... It will not in fact energize the W terminal when the heat is on. The solution is to use an A50 relay to detect when the blower is going. Make sure to wire the relay into the circuit running from the humidistat to the humidifier!


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Since tenants are involved, you'll need to do this right If you were owner-occupying a zoned single-family dwelling, then taking shortcuts in the interest of expediency would be an acceptable way to get rough estimates of zone energy usage for your own uses. However, you're not in that situation; you're dealing with tenants instead, which brings real ...


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No, that's not a valid way to determine energy usage. With a hot water system you need to know three things: The flow rate of the water The temperature drop of the water through the loop The time over which this happens With these 3 you can determine the energy "lost" in the loop which presumably went into your rooms. The "magic" formula you'll need is: ...


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It might be dangerous to assume that each pump delivers the same flow to each zone so you may need more than the run-time for an accurate set of results. So pump run time, flow rate and the temperature drop of the fluid delivering the heat (ie supply and return temperature). You could then compare with the boiler hot water output using the run-time of the ...


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While similar in appearance, there is considerable difference between an AC outside compressor and a Heat Pump outside compressor. The Heat Pump unit requires extra plumbing and control components to reverse the operation and produce heat for the air handler vs. cold. These parts are not present in an AC compressor since they would add cost without any ...


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If the solar is correctly designed then the call for backup from the furnace should be minimal. Why change to a heat pump? The capital cost is not likely to get paid off... Why not consider reducing the load: look at the insulation levels and quality of the building ie air leaks etc.


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You may be moving too much air with your blower fan. A ton of AC should have 400 cfm blowing, so the fan speed depends on the size of the cooling unit. It seems counter intuitive, but think of the dwell/contact time of the air on the cooling coils. More contact means better heat exchange, better dehumidified air. Drier air feels cooler.


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