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You can be +/- 10% off on the uF rating and it'll work. I'd definitely make a label on or inside the unit to remind you what the original dual capacitor's rating was so you don't forget in the future. These things are cheap, so just replace with the one you have for now to get it working, order the correct part, then swap them once it arrives and keep the ...


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My recommendation would be to run a de-humidifier in the house to control the excess humidity. If you do not want the noise in the living space as I did not then I would put the de-humidifier in the basement. You should open 2 registers in the basement and have at least 2 floor level return grills to circulate air in the basement. Set the de-humidifier at a ...


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A wood floor is going to slow down the response a lot. Wood over cement will usually be on furring strips on the concrete. (How will you miss your pipes? Glue the strips to the floor? Put the blocks of wood between the pipes to attach the wood to later?) I've actually never seen someone put down an extra layer of concrete so that they can put wood on ...


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We have underfloor heating, pipes like you describe with a 50mm screed of light concrete, well cement, surrounding and covering the pipes and heavy tiles (12mm thick) as the final floor surface. The heat transfer is fine but the response is slow - but we designed for that as the floor stores heat to be gently released as we also have the sun heating it ...


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I had one vent that was making whining noise in a back bedroom . I bought $6 car door edge strip (has a U profile shape) and put it on the sealing edge of my vent and it stopped the noise. It was enough to stop the resonance and natural frequency of the vent grill.


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On dual transformer systems, Nest expects the common wire to come from the cool side (Nest Pro Guide, bottom of page 20); look towards your A/C not your boiler. If there is a common terminal on your A/C control board and 18/5 wire bundle - use one of the extra wires to connect the common terminal to your Nest 18/3 wire bundle Use Venstar Add-A-Wire (or ...


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Your smart thermostat requires a common wire so it can get power. It doesn't "use" the common wire for anything and your furnace or the new cooler will not need anything to happen with the common wire. This is a simplification, but think of the R wire as positive and the C wire as negative. The thermostat sends the positive voltage from R to the other ...


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Changing a cap is easy you have the basic idea. First pull the fuses or disconnect the power to the unit the disconnect should be close to the outside unit. Next if your cap has 3 connections use a screwdriver to short the common or c post to the fan then common to herm , if 2 post just short them together it only takes a second to fully discharge a ...


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With strategy 1, you're basically emulating what your AC's thermostat in energy saver mode would do when set to a temperature of about 72 degrees -- it will cool to a bit beyond the set point, then switch off for a while, and let the temperature rise a bit above the set point, and then switch on again. Most ACs have a range of about 2-3 degrees around the ...


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You're right to worry that opening up that room to the rest of the basement will mix combustion gases with the rest of the air. I'm guessing from some clues (oil-fired boiler, baseboard heat) that you're in a cooler climate. You could cool that space separately from the rest of the house. Can you draw in outside air on a thermostat-triggered vent fan? A/...


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This may or may not apply to you, but you have a newer system so there's a better chance of this being the case. Some air handlers have blowers that can operate at more that one speed, and the zone controller that you have can control these speeds (section in red under #6): Zone Controller Manual When multiple zones call for heat or cooling, the fan ...


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To me it looks like the drain line is plugged causing the condensate to build up in the air handler. Once the water level is high enough it finds a way out. You know your pump is working but now you need to make sure to clear the line from the air handler to the pump. It is quite common for dust and spores to develop blockages in the tubing and this ...


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So the intake was cold because the evaporator coils were freezing. Jim speculated that this was because there was a leak with the Freon. That wasn't the issue. After employing the services of a tech, he discovered that the switch to turn the outside unit on and off was bad. It would sometimes stick open and other times closed. The result was that ...


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This appears that they used the channel between studs as a return air duct. Look at the duct that attaches to it and see if it is also a return air duct or if it goes to the return side of the air handler. That said, drilling a small hole to hang something should be fine. Make sure you drill as close to the center of the stud as you can - you don't want a ...


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In a comment you said, AC unit is outside. Assuming you're talking about a whole-house AC unit, what's outside is the condenser. There's another half to the system - the evaporator. it sits inside your "furnace" and cools the air forced over it by the circulation fan in your furnace, which in turn circulates through your ducts and cools your house. AC ...


3

Having a bad capacitor can put an extra strain on the motor. An AC is actually a pretty simple device when it comes down to it, so the only replaceable parts (in this situation) are the fan and the capacitor. Some units have a control board that handles some timing and sensors. That can go bad but it's not as common (in my limited experience anyway). If ...


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Called Carrier and talked to a technician. They said it could be transformer or fan motor. They need to be replaced. Will see the company tomorrow. Keep my fingers crossed.


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AFIK the main cause of freezing on the evaporator coil is low refrigerant. This may sound counter-intuitive but it is a well known accepted fact. There may be other possible causes. I think the blower is supposed to continue for a short period after the compressor cycles off and your unit may not be doing that. Call a competent a/c tech. This is not a DIY ...


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There is a heat pump that requires no HVAC licensing to install and it has a factory warranty, I found out about this in a training class. Some of the answers here were close, there are 120v (smaller units) and some 240v units, they require a pad or house bracket like any other split system and a local disconnect for the power. Both the evaporator / line set ...


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That whole fan assembly will need to be replaced unless you want to do some work hand-making a bracket that will accept a modern exhaust fan motor. Even then, the fan motors and blades for a modern install probably wouldn't move air efficiently in that size of enclosure. Your main concern will be finding a new fan that is easy to connect to your 3x10 vent. ...


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Yes, that C connector on the valves is what you want. The nest thermostats use very little power, so that shouldn't be an issue for your transformer. There are two wires coming from the transformer. On a typical HVAC system, the red wire is used for control, and the other wire is what gets used as the "common" or C-wire. In your diagram it looks like ...


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I think you may need to have your ducts tested and resealed. Leaky ducts can allow musty air from a basement or else where in, and results in low output in parts of the house. Causing warm/cool spots.


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I can imagine a case where the damper motor stops working in the heat of the day, or the heat somehow causes the damper to bind. Those zone controller systems have a diagnostics mode that allows you to test many of the components from the control panel. When it's hot and zone 2 isn't working, you can test the damper with the control panel and perhaps ...


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Fresh Air Intake Some HVAC systems provide the circulation for the fresh air intake system (The 'V' in HVAC). When operating in fresh air intake mode, these systems will periodically open the fresh air damper and turn on the blower of your central unit. These systems are almost always controlled by an external Fresh Air Controller (Like this one) ...


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It is not advisable to run the a/c without a filter in place nor to run the washable one while it is wet. Damp may be OK but not wet. The best practice would be to get another of the washable filters and rotate them. Alternatively get a disposable filter that you use while the washable filter is drying. You could speed up the drying process using a shop ...


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I replaced two trane 20 year old system s with dual speed trane 18 seer. The unit with the longest travel had a terrible odor. What had changed was the tech recommends I run just filters in house and eliminate the return on the air handlers. I added that filter in the odor unit thus causing the air handler to run longer and in this case more efficient


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Yes, there is. The problem is that a mini-split is, after all, split. That means the pipes between compressor and evaporator are custom fit and routed through your house. Obviously, you can't fill the pipes until after they are fit. So if the fluid is freon, yeah, you're gonna need a license. However that's not the only way to do it. Entire Freon ...


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I thought DIY installation of a minisplit R-410A system was allowed. The condensing unit is precharged with refrigerant, and in at least some of these systems no soldering is required to connect the refrigerant lines. One might have to have a licensed technician do any adjustment of the charge, but the refrigerant charge on board as sold is correct for the ...


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A thermal camera may be helpful if there are significant duct leaks, but if things are sealed up well, the wall/floor/ceiling surface temperatures shouldn't reveal the duct locations. Inductive reasoning will carry you far. Think about how the structure is built. Because air ducts are usually large they seldom cross inside floor joists or wall studs. The ...


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Just as the hot air goes up since it is lighter the cold air will fall since it is heavier. If by chance you have a forced air heating system, you could run the furnace fan while the A/C units are on to help distribute and mix all the air in the house for better comfort. My son did this in his house for many years and it worked fine.


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Draining into sinks is not ideal. You have the plumbing in an inconvenient location and it tends to accumulate mildew. Outside is probably better. One approach to dealing with the insect thing is a bell outlet with screening. Simply increase the size of the pipe dramatically at the outlet and install insect screening however is convenient.


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I am really not sure you have asked a question. Your heading mentions a diagram but you have no diagram just pictures. So when you send in better pictures per @ThreePhaseEel request you might see if you could post up some sort of diagram. If you real question is, Why isn't my cooling coming on? Then one of the reasons is that you haven't connected you're ...


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