New answers tagged

1

We're talking about two panels: #1 the panel you asked about in earlier questions which is Eaton or predecessor. and #2 the new panel you just linked which is Eaton. In both cases, you must use Eaton BR breakers. You must use breakers UL-listed and approved for the panel. Breaker panels differ - to avoid patent infringement they all made their bus stabs ...


-2

I know this is old, but I thought I would share in case someone else stumbles upon it. This would work exactly as the OP originally described it, and how it looks to be wired, as long as the hot water heater is 120v, which they usually are because even though the dryer uses 240v, it actually uses two parallel 120v circuits - 120v for the heating element, and ...


0

People are asking about labeling because "UL" or other lab Listing is brand specific. I wouldn't really look to the panel cover for that information, all those custom screw holes make me suspect the cover isn't the right cover. The guts do look like an Eaton panel and new Eaton short body AFCI breakers would fit. But the neutral bar is suspect, not ...


1

They'll work on the left column. Maybe not on the right column. That's because of the small size of the box, and that's a reason this style of box has largely been abolished. The AFCIs won't require any modifications to the cover. While the area behind the cover is larger, the part that sticks through the cover is exactly the same.


1

TL;DR Your panel should be fine for GFCI/AFCI but I wouldn't bother unless this is the easiest way to add GFCI for kitchens/bathrooms. The typical problem with replacing regular breakers with GFCI/AFCI breakers is with "half-size" or "tandem" breakers. These are where a standard breaker "space" is split into two breakers in ...


2

Yes you can punch a hole through the back. I usually try to use the space below the breakers (in fact if you look you may have pre punched knockouts there already. If you don’t have pre punched holes you can use an appropriately sized hole saw and punch a hole, using locknuts to secure the conduit to both the box and panel. I try to place my box next to a ...


2

While it may be technically OK (I am not a code expert), unless it must be directly behind the panel, far better would be to connect to one of the sides or top or bottom, then turn 90 degrees to go through the wall. You might need an extra little piece of conduit or two, but if there is ever a need to replace the entire panel, it will be much easier not ...


1

If the unit provides a maximum size breaker or OCPD you can not go above that value. Since you state it is a 25 amp I would install a 30 amp breaker and things will normally work fine. If the FLA / RLA is the 25 amp value a standard 30 amp HACR rated breaker would be normal with 10 awg wires, But wait the code book states 125% of a motor load, I agree but ...


1

The root of the problem is the inductive "kick" you get when you interrupt a large electric motor. Inductors are like anti-capacitors - a capacitor resists change in voltage by flowing high current, inductors resist change in current by flowing high voltage. So boldly interrupting power to a motor results in a high-voltage backlash of as much as ...


0

Standard breakers are inverse time thermal magnetic breakers, overloads cause heating which trips, short circuits have high current that trips a magnetic element. The magnetic element is different from the additional function of arc-fault breakers. I think the condition of the switch is inadequate to extinguish the arc in the switch, and the arcing is ...


0

I can think of four reasons, listed from most to least likely. The breaker may be a GFCI breaker and your motor causes temporary imbalance on ground. The breaker may be an arc fault interrupt breaker and switching the motor causes a temporary arc. The motor may cause a temporary surge dumping its momentum and temporarily generating breaker overload. And, the ...


1

Looks like you have a Square D breaker in a Eaton/Cutler Hammer panel, it needs to be replaced, but not likely the cause of your problem. The problem seems like loose connections. The bathroom receptacle and bedroom circuits should not be on the same breaker, you will likely find it is not a single loose connection fixing all your problems. Arc Fault (AFCI) ...


2

Looked the Homeline breaker up. It is also labeled for up to AWG 2/0 wire, which is not AWG 2 wire. In increasing size: AWG 2 AWG 1 AWG 0 or 1/0 AWG 00 or 2/0 The breaker terminals are rated for 75C, so good for 175A in copper or 135A in aluminum. This is, of course, only answering one part of your question.


0

What you have is a nice example of knob and tube. It looks like a standard distribution panel to me normally the feeders are the same size because if I understand your explanation You have 2 feeders that is not unusual, each block is clamped to the hot from your service the neutral usually tied in closer to the branch circuit location. Is this safe? Yes ...


9

That Eaton breaker DOES NOT belong in that GE panel! That's called an "alien breaker". The bus stabs on different makes of panel are different shape (to avoid patent infringement) and they will "clip in" but they won't work reliably. You can get a panel fire, which will at the very least burn up a bus stab, taking 2 spaces out of ...


0

This sounds like a multi wire branch circuit and the reason code was revised to require handle ties. If a multiwire branch circuit this is a common issue as the circuit that is still energized has power returning on that neutral.


1

I'm going to assume that these two wires are routed together from the panel to the HVAC system. In that case you have PARALLEL CONDUCTORS and you get an INDUCTION of voltage on one from the other. If you measure with a high-impedance VOM/Multimeter (most are 1M Ohm or greater) there is not enough load on the parallel circuit to drop the induced voltage. If ...


0

In the US a residential kitchen fridge is not required to be on a dedicated circuit. This is a tradeoff. If it's shared with a lighting circuit or even outlets, you may be more quick to notice if there's ever a problem. A fridge with a dedicated outlet is NOT required to have GFCI protection, and some fridge manufacturers recommend against GFCI for the ...


1

Well, I don't like the final answer to this, but it is directly from the manufacturer. I emailed Eaton and they responded withing 24 hours each time. Kudos to them, thanks! Summary: Just don't pay attention to the lights except when an actual event triggers the breaker. Anything else the light does like staying on, flashing, not flashing, flashing a code ...


2

As far as question # 3: There are basically two types of wiring: cables and individual wires. Generally speaking (there are exceptions at very large sizes), when using individual wires in conduit, the color coding (US/Canada) is: White or Gray = Neutral Green or uninsulated = Ground Anything else - Black, Red, Yellow, Blue, etc. = Hot (including Switched ...


2

They're under totally different codes. Pole lines up to your weatherhead comply with NESC. All installed wiring in your house complies with NEC. Appliances and equipment comply with the UL "White Book", a whole family of UL standards for various products. UL = Underwriter's Laboratories. Laboratory = testing lab. Underwriter = insurance company. ...


1

Sure, manufacturer have different rules on the gauge of the wires in equipment, there are tables in the code book that give tables for wire sizes within the machine panels and the ampacity when the wire exits the piece of equipment these values do not have the safety factors like the building code requires because inside the equipment panels higher ...


0

This is an Eaton dual-mode GFCI and AFCI breaker. It's not a mystery gadget. Aside from its normal overcurrent job (of any breaker), it also has Ground Fault Circuit Interruptor and an Arc Fault circuit interruptor. It's not a mystery gadget, it simply has three functions (which is really six): Overcurrent - mechanical magnetic instant trip for dead shorts ...


0

If the lamp is hard wired not a plug in receptacle you may be able to use a regular breaker. I have had more than a few problems on lighting circuits and electronic breakers the electronics have problems with the wave shaping electronics but usually on larger loads than a single lamp it sounds like that may be your issue. Since it is working I would contact ...


0

I can't comment yet, not enough reputation points. But I have an issue with he answer from Tester101, it gets one of the details correct but doesn't continue in the documentation to the next critical detail about the status lights. Yes, the 1-6 flash status code holds the "last" failure. And for a brand new one that would be the "failure" ...


1

People upsize breakers for lots of reasons - they're getting nuisance trips (because they're overloading the circuit), or they happen to have the wrong size breaker on hand and don't want to go to the store. Maybe something like: Baseboard couldn't ever take more than 2 amps, and a short would trip the breaker anyway ? (But yeah, I guess code is not like ...


3

There are certain cases (see recommended wire gauge for well pump and float switch for one) involving certain motor loads which can be on a larger breaker than the wire size needed. But that doesn't apply to most residential situations, such as heaters. However, there is a big difference between the wiring that is part of an appliance and the wiring between ...


2

The 40A breaker is almost definitely the correct size. The installation manual does not state breaker size but it refers to plug-in installation using ideally a 40A cord but 50A is OK. Plus 2 burners should not be anywhere near 40A. Which means either something is malfunctioning in the range or the breaker is failing. If you can get an in-use current - clamp ...


3

Yes, you can. Chances are that you have a white wire connected to one of the terminals of the old 240-volt breaker, and you can repurpose it to neutral. When you put in the new 120-volt breaker, connect the black wire to the breaker terminal and the white to the neutral bus bar, removing any black tape on the white wire. Replace the 240-volt receptacles with ...


1

The electronics of the treadmill are putting out "noise" that the CAFCI breaker is interpreting as a potentially dangerous arc. This can be caused by all kinds of things, including motors, but in this case the motor is fine and it is "no motor" when you have a problem. My hunch is that the noise of the electronics gets "lost" ...


9

NEC 110.3(B) obey labeling and instructions. That's it. That's the NEC code that they won't tell you. It's the third paragraph in the entire NEC. So if the hot tub complied with NEC 110.2 (use approved equipment), it will have come with instructions and/or labeling. Those will state the breaker size(s) you must use for it. Don't harsh on the electrician ...


18

The usual setup is: Large breaker, matched to wire size, in the main panel. Wires (protected by breaker) to a subpanel In the subpanel, a separate breaker & wires matched to each appliance. GFCI is both code and critical life safety for hot tubs. The wonderful thing about GFCI protection is that it can be at almost any level - breaker in the main panel,...


39

Since the wire is 14/2, the breaker feeding it must be 15A. Someone apparently changed that to a 20A breaker (presumably because they were sick of constant breaker trips every time they attempted to use two heat appliances at once). Since that was done, you have the sense of "hey, do it even more". That "end justifies the means" POV ...


2

Your hands are tied You have a useful diagnostic indication that the GFCI breakers trip in certain breaker spaces but not in others. However you can't develop that diagnostic path further, because a) your 40-space panel is completely full, b) all the wires have been cut short so they can only reach the breakers they are going to now, and c) you do not ...


0

Are these breakers together? I've heard that Homeline plug-on-neutral breakers are more susceptible to thermal overload. What is probably feeding that is how the new Homeline panels do things. An AFCI or CAFCI needs a neutral connection so it can monitor the full circuit. For older panels, that means you connect the neutral to the breaker and then run the ...


2

You can't use 14 AWG permanent wiring on a 20A circuit because the code says so. There is an exception specifically for switches to allow a 15A switch on hardwired lighting (obviously with a max. load of 15A) on a 20A circuit. But that is quite different from the wire itself. Among other things, we have many questions here that are essentially: I have a ...


1

I sounds to me like you have a MWBC (multi wire branch circuit) that's probably feeding outlets in a kitchen. Have I divined this correctly? If so, those are required to be DEDICATED outlets and can't be shared with other outlets or lighting. Next point: You can't use 14/3 on a 20 amp circuit unless you swap out the breaker for a 15 amp breaker and mark the ...


5

You can not use 14 awg wire on a 20 amp protected circuit it would violate code and create a fire hazard. One example is 14 awg wire can fit into back stabs and even on 15 amp circuits these regularly fail on a 20 amp circuit they would be a fire hazard. You can use an extension cord and there are several reasons this can be safe. Extension cords are ...


5

You are fine with just capping off the white wire in the outlet box. Usually people here have the opposite problem: Needing a 4 wire feed and only have 3, you have a good problem! Which isn't exactly a problem. If you want to be double/triple sure, remove the cover of your main panel and see where those wires land. Probably both the neutral and ground will ...


15

Go ahead and cap the unused white (neutral) wire off Your plan to cap the unused white wire off is fine, and for the best even, as it'll leave it available in case someone else wishes to run a 4-wire appliance off this circuit in the future.


2

Thanks to @ThreePhaseEel I dare say the problem is fixed. Asking the right question - in this case "what make/model are your circuit breakers" is what led to the answer - a standard breaker was inappropriate for such a large inductive load. After replacing it with a "high magnetic" breaker it hasn't tripped once. I did not know such ...


0

You need the pigtail neutral version of what you're looking at Your problem is that Home Depot sent you off to the Plug-on Neutral (N suffix) version of the Q120DF, which isn't compatible with older panels. Instead, you need the plain Q120DF(P), which has a neutral pigtail on it and is compatible with your panel.


1

PON (Plug On Neutral) panels are a relatively new development. Given the date of your panel there's virtually no chance its a PON panel. You'll need to find a breaker with a pigtail.


2

It turned out not to be an overload, but a bad leg coming into the meter box. Apparently, with all the rain, water had seeped into the underground box (which eventually connects into the meter box), causing arcing. So one leg was 120, the other 20; half the house wasn’t getting power. Being a first-time homeowner, it never occurred to me to check the meter ...


2

You're looking at the right thing, either way The THQL1120GF was replaced with the THQL1120GFT when the UL 943 mandate for automatic self-testing in GFCIs went in; the P suffix is likely simply for blister (retail) packaging vs a breaker sold loose, as you'd get at an electrical supply house.


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