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3

You will need at least 1 new circuit, and break the circuit and install that new 15amp circuit (I am guessing the wiring is 14 awg) you can get things to work by removing some of the load but you probably have figured that out. If you have room adding a breaker is not that hard but you will need to do some reading and ask more questions. You cannot use 20 ...


2

What matters is your actual draw, not the numbers on the breakers. So for instance, if you have 5 circuits of bathroom, bedroom, laundry room, and kitchen... And then 5 circuits of Bitcoin miner that run at 15.9A 24x7... You don't want to put the miners on one leg and the household load on the other. The 2 kitchen circuits are rarely used, for instance, so ...


18

They are Multi-Wire Branch Circuits This is a wiring strategy that depends on North America's system of having "neutral in the middle" of 240V, giving two legs of 120V. A circuit can be wired so that it brings out both legs, giving a single circuit which is effectively two 120V circuits which share a neutral and ground. This provides a savings in wire,...


2

If it wasn't a QO or Murray panel... I would say this is just too close. However, I think we can "cheat it", especially if you are willing to fit a subpanel. I'll disregard the 120V loads for now; it looks like a gas dryer. Based on what you've mentioned, it appears the large 240V loads are 30A sauna 40A range If there are others, do the same thing ...


0

A simple non contact voltage tester will detect voltage on a deenergized circuit when another live cable is in close contact, the way non contact sensors work is using the Hall effect. You can prove a similar function by standing under a power line and raising a fluorescent lamp above your head, wow the light glows, not full power but it glows, Hall effect ...


1

This really feels too close. You only have 40A available once the charger is going, and you run the AC at night. Heating/cooling is one of the biggest energy usages in a house, and that doesn't stop at night. I think downgrading to a 30A charger should be safe, (and will still recharge your car overnight.)


1

Overall adding breakers to empty slots is not an issue. What is a major issue is that the combined currents of all appliances that are turned ON must NOT exceed the rating of the main breaker. Ideally you want some safety room as well, at least twenty amps to spare. The reason for a safety margin is that when large electric motors startup the current can ...


1

Cooker (range/oven/cooktop) loads are special...unless the manual says to do something different Considering that most folks don't run every element and burner on a range or oven/cooktop pairing at full blast at the same time, all the time (your house would get rather toasty if you did!), the NEC has special rules for cooking appliance loads, given in 220....


-2

There is a minimum height from the floor to the bottom circuit breaker. I thought it wa 3'9". But I can't find it in the NEC yet.


1

I'm not sure about the Viking cooktop. The installation instructions repeat the specs but don't specify a breaker size. It sounds like a 50A should do it, though 48A continuous would actually need a 60A breaker. You may want to check with Viking on that. The Kitchenaid oven is very clear in the specs: Models rated from 7.3 to 9.6 kW at 240 volts (5.5 to ...


2

TLDR: Pay your landlord to add a 20A dedicated circuit for this PC. Fuggedaboutit. 1350W is just too much. Remember, you're talking 1350 watts at the low voltage DC side - you have conversion losses. You must provide what the AC-side requires. That will be clearly stated in the specs, or placarded on the unit. Here's a Rosewill Photon 1350. Let's be ...


0

Best suggestion I can think of is to do what you don't want to do which is upgrade the circuit. I realize you specifically say that you don't want to do this but if you're living in the US you will be too close to popping the breaker to call it safe. Where I work we always leave a decent margin of safety to keep from overloading the circuits. If you still ...


2

I don't imagine you just opened up your panel for no reason; I'm guessing appliances have stopped working in your house? You could bust the seal on the meter pan and measure the lugs there. But there's really nothing to break in there, so I'm guessing you'll see the same exact measurements... so it's not worth the paperwork to break the seal. Call your ...


2

This is easy Fortunately, it appears that always-hot is present at the receptacle location in your case, so fixing the daftness the prior installers pulled (NEC 404.14(E) prohibits dimming general-purpose receptacles if nothing else does, for reasons that range from mere flickery lights to appliances that express their displeasure at being dimmed by getting ...


1

This is definitely an old post, but, it appears that the OP meant poles in the circuit breaker box. There are (in the US at least) 2 power poles in the box, and a powerline internet extender would not be able to cross the poles in a panel, so knowing which outlets are on which poles would be useful information. If your breaker box is open, under the breakers,...


1

That crackle is called arcing or an arc fault. It is serious business, and will explain the voltage drop. It will also create dangerous amounts of heat. If you are literally hearing it (acoustically) then you must be quite near it. Keep looking. In the breaker panel, you checked the hot, but there are two additional wires. You can generally ...


2

Since the problem does not happen with other appliances, it sounds like this is a problem with this one circuit. You have already swapped the breaker, so that leaves: Wire If this is 14AWG wire/15A circuit, try a 20A circuit (which should be 12AWG wire) if you have one available. That should help generally with voltage drop, but NOT with any fizzing and ...


2

Circuit breakers and fuses are for overcurrent protection. They are not heat detectors. Therefore they only trip if the current exceed the breaker rating. The most common cause of a burn or fire comes from a poor or loose connection in a circuit. When a load is applied to a circuit with a poor connection and, the conductor begins to heat up. This causes ...


0

Having 240V and 120V outlets at the same room gives a theoretical possibility to connect a wire between two outlets. That wire can make a short circuit through lower spec 120V wire but the only breaker in the current route is the one for 240V outlet. The low spec wire can have so big resistance that the breaker trips far too late => overheatened wire inside ...


8

It's a lot like aviation. "Little" code violations can stack up and interact to become big ones. The electrical code is written in blood and ash, which is to say it's less about theory and more about actuarial analysis of accident patterns - pro and con. For instance blown insulation around knob-and-tube wiring was banned, and is now being un-banned ...


2

There are a few options like that available for residential use. Something like the Sense Monitor. It has two clamps that wrap around the supply coming into the panel, and monitors the amperage used there. It also has all kinds of smarts to figure out based on usage patterns which circuit is currently drawing and how much. I'm sure there are other devices ...


1

Many "clean" options exist, but they will require slipping (non-clamp-on) current transformers over the conductors in question, and for the main feed that is a job where you probably want the power company to [shut off your power / pull the meter] while you (or your electrician) do it. I have a Murata ACM20 unit on my well circuit, though I cannot recommend ...


5

I recently looked into ways to monitor my solar panels and my home's power usage, so I've got some experience with this. Can you get the parts to do this? Absolutely. Here in the UK, our breakers are in a 'consumer unit' with the breakers mounted on DIN rail - and the suppliers of industrial parts can supply DIN-rail-mounted power meters - such as this DIN-...


1

You may want to take a look at the Socomec Multifunction Meters. Industrial grade multimeters that provide current, voltage, power, max values and average values and can be installed into the circuitry of your panels. You can attach communication interfaces to it, so the multimeter provides data in Profibus, Modbus and IIRC ModbusRTU (I am not affiliated ...


1

There are small inexpensive devices for sale called "Kill-A-Watt" that you can plug into an outlet, then plug in your appliance / device and it will tell you the watts, amps etc. that the device uses. I find them very handy to snoop out power drains. For the Whole House, there is a system called a TED (The Energy Detective); more expensive than a Kill-A-Watt ...


19

You're going to careen headlong into NEC 110.2. All equipment must be approved. You want a conductive ammeter. OK, because of the exigencies, that's going to be a large enclosure that will need to mount past your main breaker. You can't insert that between your main breaker and buses in your panel, because your panel isn't listed for that. That means ...


12

Check out the Sense Energy Monitor -- it does use clamp on ammeters, but they're meant to be permanently installed. Other than that, I think it would meet your requirements.


2

Shared Circuit Assuming this isn't just some crazy coincidence, I'd bet on: The alarm and the lights are on the same breaker When you left the breaker off for an extended period of time, the battery on the alarm started to get low, which caused the chirping as a (correct) warning Red and black on the alarm are battery connections and not incoming AC power. ...


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