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Since it will run for a time and trip I would be looking at the small deep freeze. AFCI’s don’t do well with motor loads and if the load on the circuit is heavy they do not work well with dimmers and lights that require ballast, I would try putting the deep freeze on another circuit and see if things change since it holds until a switch position is changed I ...


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Best method for homeowners would be to plug in something with noise ( Floor fan set on "high", vacuum cleaner, corded drill motor ) and firstly look at your panel breakers to see if the circuit you're interested in turning off is labeled... If you see a "potential candidate" breaker, then turn that one off first. If not, listen, turn one off and if your ...


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You want to trip the overcurrent detector (breaker) serving a GFCI outlet. No. Don't do it. What you're looking for is so similar to the other question that it really is a duplicate. It is wrong for all the reasons that one is wrong (and not insane in a certain industrial setting for the reasons I describe in my answer there). The presence of GFCI is ...


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I suppose this answer more properly belongs on the linked question rather than here, but.. if you really want to trip the overcurrent breaker and not trip the GFCI outlet, then the only thing to do is introduce an overcurrent. A dead short as proposed by answers in that related question is indeed an overcurrent, but it's also rather extreme. The thing to ...


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Honestly, the safest way (assuming this is a receptacle circuit) is to use a plug-in wiring tester with a GFCI test button. Plug in, push button, done. No safety issues or hassles. And you really should own one as an electrical DIYer anyways.


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Tripping a GFCI receptacle disconnects the hot power conductor at the receptacle. All GFCI receptacles have a TEST button which when pressed trips the GFCI receptacle. Tripping a GFCI breaker disconnects the hot power at the breaker (in the panel) for the entire circuit. There are devices called GFCI testers which when plugged into a GFCI protected circuit ...


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The GFCI section will trip if any current leaves the hot wire without returning on the neutral wire. The circuit breaker will trip if more current leaves the hot wire than its trip rating, such as 15 or 20A. So, if you want to induce a trip on the breaker without tripping the GFCI outlet, you simply need to draw more current than the breaker's rating ...


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Whoever told you that was referring to ***A***FCI breakers, and only in the context of a GE panel. In every other case, they don't know what they're talking about. A GFCI operates by comparing the currents on all the normal/intended conductors to assure that current in = current out To do that, it needs access to all the conductors at once (not ground)....


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Never gonna work. Sorry, but even if you might be able to get one at a time to work, GFCI on MWBC is based on the breaker comparing "all hot" to "all neutral". Two electrically separate breakers simply can't do that. The handle tie requirement satisfies the general MWBC safety issue of making sure that if one is off for maintenance then the other is off as ...


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This very much sounds like a case of what is called Open Neutral. This can be a very serious condition, depending on where it is. Where you plug something in that results in a voltage somewhere else, do plugged in equipment or lights operate properly? An Open Neutral is when the neutral wire of a circuit is disconnected or not making proper contact. The ...


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I brought some electrical equipment with me from the UK, and have been using step-up transformers (SUT) to power the UK items You overloaded it. Plain and simple. When you change voltage, watts remains constant, so it's a good unit to use. The UK uses 240 volts at 13 A breaker trip. That's 3120 watts. Many heat appliances, such as hair dryers, coffee ...


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Tenant side What you need is a plug-in electric meter. It's called a Kill-a-Watt and it costs $20-30. Every time you turn something on, go check the Kill-a-Watt and see what you're pulling. It offers several figures, the one you want is amps. I gather you don't have a foggy clue how much power various devices draw. You'll get edumacated right quick with ...


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I'd like the well pump's power to be automatically killed during a power outage and only turn it on manually when I can get to the house to inspect, I'd use a thermostat inside the home, set to a few degrees above freezing. When temperature is too low, it shuts down power to the pump. You need a thermostat for air conditioning, not for heating, as contacts ...


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If your HVAC situation permits it... The ability to have a source of heat that works during a power outage is a massive asset, especially if power outages are a serious concern (as they typically are on the long overhead feeds found in rural areas). Either a wall furnace (Empire-style) or a gas fireplace can be used; either way, you'll want a sealed ...


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When a breaker fits two where one goes, we call that type of breaker a double stuff. GFCI and AFCI breakers don't come in double stuff. The electronics will not physically fit. Fortunately for you, anything that was legal at the time it was installed is grandfathered. You don't need to modernize your wiring everytime Code is updated. If you must ...


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I found GE’s residential circuitbreaker page. Given that it’s correct and complete, GE doesn’t sell a 1/2” QP line AFCI or AFCI/GFCI combo breaker. I think they would be good sellers. GE’s Residential Circuitbreaker site


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Simpler than that... Use a rundown timer on the water pump 12 hours after you set it, it automatically shuts off, whether you are present or not. It's a nuisance while you're there, but can't be forgotten. Use a furnace that doesn't use electricity That would be an "Empire style" floor or wall furnace. Ours does fine service during outages.


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This can be handled with a simple motor start station rated adequately to handle the load of the well pump. Additionally, you will need a momentary manual start switch. Feed the control circuit through momentary start switch off the line side of the contactor. Feed a holding circuit off the load side of the contactor. Then with a standard manual ...


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OK. Based on the information you gave, it appears the last person wired this as a plain 240V circuit "NEMA 6" style. He did not change the receptacles to NEMA 6-15 or 6-20 as Code requires. Perhaps he didn't know that was possible, or didn't want to spend the money on sockets and cords. I suspect he had some large loads that worked on dual-voltage 120V/...


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No, you have to clamp each wire individually.


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GFCIs detect ground faults within appliances. AFCI's detect arcing faults, usually in wiring in the walls, but sometimes in appliances. But the first law of GFCIs is these things only happen to other people. Your appliances don't fail! Seriously, people really do think that, and will spend hours and hundreds of dollars chasing every problem but that. ...


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Trip diagnostics a-la QO The QO dual function and combination arc fault breakers use a somewhat peculiar procedure for trip reason readout, as detailed in the installation instructions: Turn the breaker OFF. Push and hold the TEST button for the remainder of the procedure Start a stopwatch at the same time you turn the breaker back ON Stop the stopwatch ...


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BURNINATE THIS PANEL BEFORE IT BURNINATES YOUR HOUSE You have a larger problem here than your inability to find a main breaker; namely, that your panel is one of those infamous FPE Stab-Lok firestarters. I would have the meter pulled (or "pulled", most smart meters can disconnect the power to your house remotely upon utility request, and your average ...


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You have an arc fault breaker. It has two jobs: Detect current which is excessive Detect arc faults. Arc faults are when arcing occurs (when it's not supposed to; obviously throwing a switch is an expected arc). Arcing is the blue-white flash you may have seen when plugging in certain things to certain places. The AFCI literally listens to the power ...


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You have a fault in the wiring in your wall, not the breaker Most AFCIs, including your Homeline unit, also contain a ground fault trip in order to help them catch firestarting arc-to-ground type faults (note, that the "arcs" AFCIs catch don't have to be clearance arcs through air, but can and often are creepage arcs along contaminated insulating surfaces ...


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You're not answering what Ed Beal and Harper are asking. Is the breaker heating up? You can check that with an infrared thermometer which you can find for somewhere south of $30.00. You also just revealed the the breaker is an AFCI (arc fault circuit interrupter). It trips when it senses something arcing. It is quite different from a GFCI (ground fault ...


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Window AC draws more power than a fridge and they get a dedicated circuit by code. (mostly because the loss of power to a fridge is a big inconvenience) That said: Breakers are not peas in a pod. Some will trip below rated capacity (rare) Replacing the breaker with a 20A, given that you have 12 ga wire is a cheap and easy first kick at the cat. Take the ...


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A microwave will use more than it's rated power, because nothing is 100% efficient, and some microwaves are less efficient than you might think. (The actual power usage should be on a sticker somewhere around the microwave door frame.) Also, a microwave will use even more power than that when first turning on, because it takes extra energy to start things up....


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That's just a disconnect That's not an old fuse-era fuse box. That's a perfectly modern shutoff switch/disconnect. That guarantees it is fed from somewhere else. Somewhere else, there will be a service panel of some kind. The vast majority of service panels generally are circuit-breaker panels, (with equal chance of being modern, old or ancient). So ...


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You may have what is called a Rule of Six setup. This means that more than one, but no more than six, separate switches need to be turned off to turn off all power to the building. As I understand it, this was allowed many years ago in order to make large panels without having a really big main breaker, but it has been used in many different ways. It is not ...


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You may not have one. I’ve twice owned houses where the main breaker panel did not have a single master breaker. In those cases, shutting off power to the whole house involved having the professionals physically cut the lines where they reached the house. I chose to have a new breaker panel with a master shutoff installed in each case.


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