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2

I opened the box where the previous outlet was and found 10/3 wire w/ground (picture below), even though the dryer outlet on the other side of the wall and the one we had removed are both 10-30 receptacles, and so ungrounded (home was built in '92). Testing these wires confirmed two hots at 120V each, one neutral and a dead ground. Odd thing is, the bare ...


3

The old wiring is 100% irrelevant to this, since you know it isn't large enough for anything more than 30A. So ignore all that and the plastic box, etc. Except that you should replace the existing 30A dryer 10-30 receptacle with a 14-30 receptacle, which will be easy since the new subpanel will have ground going back to the main panel. You will need to ...


2

Even if the element has continuity that doesn't mean that it's okay, I would error on the side of caution and discard an element that made a loud noise before smoke/fire came flowing out if it! They are not an expensive item, I would inspect the connection where it is attached to the circuit, where it is physically mounted and ensure there are no signs of ...


5

There are actually three ways (besides "pull the plug") that an oven can shut off in an emergency: Circuit breaker in your breaker panel. This trips if the oven uses too much power for too long - typically a short circuit, which can happen due to faulty components but more often due to components that wear out over time, including switches and ...


4

It's most likely the heating element in the oven blew. It's not going to be a blown fuse, they don't pop like that. A heating element in an oven can fail with dramatic sound effects! LOL. If you're comfortable working with live circuits, remove the oven heating element and test for voltage at its connections. If you have 240v or so, the element blew and ...


8

TL;DR Switch is Shorting on Door Open Power was connected to another kitchen circuit. A slight pull on the door handle tripped the GFCI outlet. That points to one of the safety switches in the door frame having a short. Everything is fine until you open it. As you open it, part of the current going through the switch shorts to frame == ground. That will ...


12

Is the microwave door sagging a bit? This could be slightly changing the sequence of opening and closing of the microswitches in the door safety interlock, which the last time I looked are two normally open switches and one normally closed. As @ecnerwal suggests, switching out of sequence may create an intentional short circuit. Try lifting the door slightly ...


3

Eaton Type BR (for Bryant) are not compatible. Eaton Type C (for Challenger) are not compatible. At least, that's what we assume. The final word on the subject is on the panel labeling itself, where it lists all allowed breaker types. I've seen real surprises there, so it might be worth checking. Eaton Type CL (for Classified) are compatible despite not ...


1

As George says the load should be de rated from the max of 15 amps but the breaker should not trip for over current until it reaches 15 amps. What concerns me the lap top and heater go off at a different time than the lights this sounds more like an arc fault issue. since the laptop and heater go out followed by the lights I would be checking for a loose ...


2

Overview What you have there is a ranch panel. It has two lugs on the bottom made to carry full 200A to a subpanel on the inside of the house. Wire shortages must be a problem. The wire you have there, #2 copper, is good to 115A. You can only plan to use 115A, but on feeder you're allowed to "round up" to the next available breaker - 125A. (You ...


0

Since this seems to be an intermittent problem, if you're comfortable working in the main panel, swap the wire for your home office to another 15 Amp breaker in the panel and see if the problem continues on that breaker or stays on the original one. Breakers, like everything else, fail. They are energized 24/7 for many years so yes, they can fail. I've ...


5

They are correctly detecting an undiagnosed arc fault Suppose for some reason your house had eight radon detectors. And four of them went off. You have to maybe at least a little, consider - maybe entertain, I mean you at least ought to include it in the troubleshooting tree... the possibility that you have, you know, radon LOL. So you have multiple AFCIs ...


5

First a little possible why: Back in the olden days of Rule of Six panels, typical electrical service to each home was growing but was not at today's levels. A quick search shows that 100A (up from 60A) was typical in the 1950s. The key reason for Rule of Six panels was to avoid a large main breaker. But in order for that to work, you have to be reasonably ...


8

"I have an existing 14-50R...wired directly from the feeder lugs and bypasses any breaker in the subpanel. Is this okay?" No. NEC 225 which applies to Outside Branch Circuits says: 225.31 Disconnecting Means. Means shall be provided for disconnecting all ungrounded conductors that supply or pass through a building or structure. The code follows ...


8

Sorry to say this, but what a mess! For starters, that looks like a Zinsco panel, which are notorious for the breakers not tripping and other failures. Second, is that really a feed thru panel, or is it supplied from the main panel with 2 wires per leg? It's not code legal to have parallel feed wires on anything but service entrance feeds in a residential ...


12

Feed-through like that is legal in general (the wires are protected by the breaker in the main panel) - however those lugs are almost certainly not rated to hold down two wires, but rather only one. You need a second set of proper lugs for the feed-through. But also in this case (as NoSparksPlease pointed out) you’re in a detached outbuilding so feed-through ...


9

You have ONE 50A - 240V circuit feeding the shop. It's protected by a single 50A (double-space this being North American split phase) breaker. It has two hots (through the breaker) and one neutral. It's therefore fine for it to connect to a 50A receptacle, directly. Edit: comments correctly point out that as a detached building, you need a local disconnect. ...


3

Shunt trip breaker add-on This is GE's "Redline" series of miniature circuit breaker products. The "Tele LE" device isn't in this catalog, but a "Tele L" device is. (page C.8) There are other "Tele Lx" with a second character, and those indicate terminal type (lug, ring, etc.) It is designed to bolt onto a Red Line ...


1

A 37.5A heater requires a 125% "derate" - so your (legal, and not burning your house down) choices are change, or never turn it on. Alternatively, since the heater appears not to be purchased yet, learn to like one that draws 32A, maximum, if you have pre-purchased and pre-installed 8AWG cable and a 40A breaker. Had you installed 8 AWG copper wires ...


3

Based on a quick supplier search for EQ-P and EQ-T (and without drilling down to the level of verification some of our normal sparkies may yet bring to bear:) GFCI - QF115 and QF120 (and others that you don't appear to need, since I don't see any MWBCs in the panel.) AFCI - Q115AF and Q120AF (and others that you don't appear to need, since I don't see any ...


5

Yes, using 12/3 into a 15 Amp circuit of 14/2 is OK. You could not go the other way and add a 14/3 to a 20 Amp circuit of 12/2.


2

Based on the installation instructions, the oven in question requires neutral (to supply 120V to the light at least, and possibly fan and control electronics as well). If it didn't require neutral, it wouldn't have a white wire at all. In that case, its instructions might permit it to be connected to existing grandfathered 3-wire 240V feeds by connecting the ...


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