We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

2

I contacted the company. The long side goes inside the box.


0

You better hope he didn't run NM-b, because that's a wet location and against NEC for a few reasons. It's can't be run in conduit or used in wet. That needs to be THHN/THWN. It sure looks like it with the paper. That's not UF-B because the sheath is grey which could be used and is solid core and not stranded like TH.


0

You should not need to modify the existing connector. If your car's manufacturer does not have an adapter to fit your charging cable to the existing NEMA 6-50, look around Amazon and/or electric car supply websites. I own a Tesla and was able to find any number of plug-converters compatible with the Tesla cable.


0

You could connect a NEMA 6-30 (not a 6-50) to the #10 hot conductors, but the Equipment Grounding Conductor needs to be minimum #10 also. If the conduit is intact and not connected to a co-centric knockout then it may satisfy the ECG, but it would be better to use the #12 as a pull wire to pull in a #10. The receptacle ground will need to be pigtailed to the ...


2

The conduit's fine...but that ground wire sure isn't While a properly installed conduit system provides quite solid grounding performance, the pigtail from the receptacle isn't what I'd call an acceptable level of workmanship by any stretch of the imagination. I would get a proper 10-32 grounding screw and use it to attach the pigtail to the ground hole in ...


1

On yours the short side goes inside the notch jimmy is commenting on is the tab the wire is held under that. That angle is hard to see but the ones I use loop a bit further.


-1

It turned out that the neutral is grounded. The electricity company is actually grounding the neutral from the distribution room. That's why they are grounding the main building panel. I bootlegged the neutral to ground and it works fine now. I actually not considering that bootlegging is a SOLUTION. But according to the fact that the neutral is grounded, ...


1

You can add a ground wire to the box from the panel that feeds it if you want to. If there is conduit it is using the conduit as the ground. With older homes you are not required to update the wiring in this case add a ground wire if the box is not connected to ground I almost never suggest lighting be updated to add grounds but regularly do suggest ...


2

Connect eight #14's by connecting a ground pigtail with four #14’s, then, the other end of the pigtail joins the other four #14’s.


2

If it was me I would go to to the electrical supply store and purchase one of this type of safety GND wire pigtail. Loosen the screw on the lamp mounting bracket and install the spade lug on the pigtail under this same screw. Re-tighten. Cut off the end with the green screw and strip the wire insulation about 3/4 inch. Remove the wire nut on the GND wires ...


2

The ground wire is ONLY for emergencies. The 'return' from an appliance or light MUST be a separate neutral wire. Re: "Any help on explaining why this is set up this way" is very simple: THEY WIRED IT UNSAFELY IN VIOLATION OF THE ELECTRICAL CODE! Yes, you need to run more wire. People do all sorts of crazy things. The NEC exists to prevent fires and ...


Top 50 recent answers are included